C1 (پیشرفته)

metamorphosis

metamorphosis [noun]

a complete change

US /ˌmet̬.əˈmɔːr.fə.sɪs/ 
UK /ˌmet.əˈmɔː.fə.sɪs/ 

دگرگونی، تغییر

مثال: 

Caterpillars go through a metamorphosis to became butterflies.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

metamorphosis

metamorphosis /ˌmetəˈmɔːfəsəs, ˌmetəˈmɔːfəsɪs $ -ˈmɔːr-/ BrE AmE noun (plural metamorphoses /-siːz/) [uncountable and countable]
[Date: 1500-1600; Language: Latin; Origin: Greek, from meta- ( ⇨ ↑meta-) + morphe 'shape']
1. formal a process in which something changes completely into something very different SYN transformation:
It took me some time to undergo the metamorphosis from teacher to lecturer.
the metamorphosis of China under Deng’s economic reforms
2. a process in which a young insect, ↑frog etc changes into another stage in its development:
Beetles undergo a complete metamorphosis in their life cycle.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

metamorphosis

meta·mor·phosis [metamorphosis metamorphoses]   [ˌmetəˈmɔːfəsɪs]    [ˌmetəˈmɔːrfəsɪs]  noun (pl. meta·mor·phoses   [ˌmetəˈmɔːfəsiːz]  ;   [metəˈmɔːrfəsiːz]  ) countable, uncountable (formal)
a process in which sb/sth changes completely into sth different
Syn:  transformation
the metamorphosis of a caterpillar into a butterfly
She had undergone an amazing metamorphosis from awkward schoolgirl to beautiful woman.  
Word Origin:
late Middle English: via Latin from Greek metamorphōsis, from metamorphoun ‘transform, change shape’.  
Example Bank:

• We studied the metamorphosis of a caterpillar into a butterfly.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

metamorphosis / ˌmet.əˈmɔː.fə.sɪs /   / ˌmet̬.əˈmɔːr- / noun ( plural metamorphoses )

[ C ] a complete change:

Under the new editor, the magazine has undergone a metamorphosis.

[ U ] specialized the process by which the young form of insects and some animals, such as frogs, develops into the adult form

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

metamorphosis

/metəmɔ:(r)fəsɪs/
(metamorphoses)

When a metamorphosis occurs, a person or thing develops and changes into something completely different. (FORMAL)
...his metamorphosis from a republican to a democrat...

= transformation

N-VAR

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

metamorphosis
meta·mor·pho·sis /ˌmɛtəˈmoɚfəsəs/ noun, pl -pho·ses /-fəˌsiːz/
1 : a major change in the appearance or character of someone or something

[count]

• We have watched her metamorphosis from a shy schoolgirl into a self-confident businesswoman.
• a company that has gone through a series of metamorphoses

[noncount]

• The government has undergone political metamorphosis since his election.
2 biology : a major change in the form or structure of some animals or insects that happens as the animal or insect becomes an adult

[noncount]

• the metamorphosis of tadpoles into frogs
• The class learned about how caterpillars undergo metamorphosis to become butterflies.

[count]

• caterpillars undergoing metamorphoses

transformation

transformation [noun]

a complete change in the appearance or character of something or someone, especially so that they are improved

US /ˌtræns.fɚˈmeɪ.ʃən/ 
UK /ˌtræns.fəˈmeɪ.ʃən/ 

دگرگونی، تغییر شکل

مثال: 

“Our education system needs to undergo a dramatic transformation” Professor Robinson declared.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

transformation

transformation AC /ˌtrænsfəˈmeɪʃən $ -fər-/ BrE AmE noun [uncountable and countable]
[Word Family: noun: ↑form, ↑formation, ↑transformation, ↑reformer, ↑reform, ↑reformation, ↑reformist, ↑transformer, ↑formlessness; verb: ↑form, ↑reform, ↑transform; adjective: reformed, ↑reformist, ↑formless; adverb: ↑formlessly]
[Word Family: verb: ↑transform; noun: ↑transformation]
a complete change in someone or something:
In recent years, the movie industry has undergone a dramatic transformation.
transformation from something to/into something
the gradual transformation from woodland to farmland
transformation of
What leads to the transformation of one economic system to another?
• • •
THESAURUS
■ a great change
transformation noun [uncountable and countable] a change in which something or someone becomes completely different: There has been a complete transformation in his attitude since he became a father. | her transformation from shy local girl to famous movie actress
revolution noun [countable] a complete change in ways of thinking or working: The 1970s saw the beginnings of a new technological revolution. | Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity started a revolution in scientific thinking.
shake-up noun [countable] a situation in which a lot of changes are very quickly made in a system or organization in order to make it more effective: The department has not performed well and is badly in need of a shake-up. | The Administration is planning a thorough shake-up of the welfare system.
U-turn noun [countable] a complete change in the plans of a government or political party so that it decides to do the opposite of what it originally said it would do: The government was forced to do a U-turn after angry protests about their taxation policy.
 

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

transformation

trans·form·ation AW [transformation transformations]   [ˌtrænsfəˈmeɪʃn]    [ˌtrænsfərˈmeɪʃn]  noun
1. countable, uncountable a complete change in sb/sth
The way in which we work has undergone a complete transformation in the past decade.
• What a transformation! You look great.

~ (from sth) (to/into sth) the country's transformation from dictatorship to democracy

2. uncountable used in South Africa to describe the process of making institutions and organizations more democratic
a lack of transformation in the private sector
Derived Word: transformational  
Word Origin:
late Middle English: from Old French, or from late Latin transformatio(n-), from the verb transformare (see trans-, form).  
Example Bank:
Going to college brought about a dramatic transformation in her outlook.
He was struggling to make the transformation from single man to responsible husband.
Japan's transformation into an economic superpower
Russia's transformation to a market economy
The transformation from disused docks into city-centre cultural venue took three years.
The way we work has undergone a radical transformation in the past decade.
• This decision marked a fundamental transformation in policy.

• The country's transformation from dictatorship to democracy has been peaceful.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

transformation / ˌtræns.fəˈmeɪ.ʃ ə n /   / -fɚ- / noun [ C or U ]

C1 a complete change in the appearance or character of something or someone, especially so that they are improved:

Local people have mixed feelings about the planned transformation of their town into a regional capital.

I'd never seen Carlo in smart evening clothes before - it was quite a transformation.

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

trans‧for‧ma‧tion
In the last five years he’s undergone a personal transformation.
N-VAR: usu with supp

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

transformation

trans·for·ma·tion /ˌtrænsfɚˈmeɪʃən/ noun, pl -tions : a complete or major change in someone's or something's appearance, form, etc.

[count]

• His appearance has undergone a complete transformation. [=his appearance has changed completely]
• The building underwent various transformations over the years.
• the character's inner transformation

[noncount]

• an agent of transformation

modification

modification [noun] (CHANGE)

a change to something, usually to improve it

US /ˌmɑː.də.fəˈkeɪ.ʃən/ 
UK /ˌmɒd.ɪ.fɪˈkeɪ.ʃən/ 

تغییر ناچیز

مثال: 

“No further modification is allowed to be made to the ultimate plan” the director announced.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

modification

modification AC /ˌmɒdəfəˈkeɪʃən, ˌmɒdɪfəˈkeɪʃən $ ˌmɑː-/ BrE AmE noun
[Word Family: verb: ↑modify; noun: ↑modification; adjective: modified ≠ UNMODIFIED]
1. [countable] a small change made in something such as a design, plan, or system SYN alteration
modification to
We’ve made one or two modifications to the original design.
They have used the same process for almost 50 years with only minor modifications.
2. [uncountable and countable] the act of modifying something, or the process of being modified SYN alteration
modification of
The review resulted in the modification of our security procedures.
modification in
Knowledge of the ill effects of tobacco has led to a modification in smoking behaviour.
• • •
COLLOCATIONS (for Meanings 1 & 2)
■ verbs
make a modification I made some modifications to the filing system.
need modification (also require modification formal) Some of the older power stations urgently needed modification.
undergo modification (=be changed) The policy has undergone considerable modification since it was first introduced.
incorporate a modification (=include a modification in something) I've incorporated a few modifications into the program.
■ ADJECTIVES/NOUN + modification
a minor/slight modification (=a small modification) The document needed a few slight modifications.
a major modification They made major modifications to the house to allow him to use his wheelchair.
extensive modifications (=a lot of changes) They had made extensive modifications to the script.
considerable/substantial modification (=when something is changed a lot) The existing system needed substantial modification.
genetic modification (=when the DNA of a living thing is changed) the genetic modification of plants and animals
behaviour modification (=when someone changes their behaviour) A star chart, in which you give a star to a child as a reward, is a simple behaviour modification technique.
lifestyle modification (=when someone changes the way they live) Lifestyle modification is the best way of dealing with moderately high blood pressure.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

modification

modi·fi·ca·tion AW [modification modifications]   [ˌmɒdɪfɪˈkeɪʃn]    [ˌmɑːdɪfɪˈkeɪʃn]  noun uncountable, countable ~ (of/to/in sth)
the act or process of changing sth in order to improve it or make it more acceptable; a change that is made
Syn:  adaptation
Considerable modification of the existing system is needed.
It might be necessary to make a few slight modifications to the design.  
Word Origin:
late 15th cent. (in Scots law, denoting the assessment of a payment): from French, or from Latin modificatio(n-), from modificare, from modus ‘measure’, from an Indo-European root shared by mete.  
Example Bank:
A modification in the law has not led to an increase in prosecutions.
The design requires considerable modification.
The original plan had undergone fairly extensive modifications.
These bikes are designed for racing and cannot be used on the road without modification.
We need to make a few modifications to the proposals.
a modification in smoking behaviour among older men

people opposed to the genetic modification of plants

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

modification / ˌmɒd.ɪ.fɪˈkeɪ.ʃ ə n /   / ˌmɑː.dɪ- / noun [ C or U ] (CHANGE)

C1 a change to something, usually to improve it:

Modification of the engine to run on lead-free fuel is fairly simple.

A couple of modifications and the speech will be perfect.
 

modification / ˌmɒd.ɪ.fɪˈkeɪ.ʃ ə n /   / ˌmɑː.dɪ- / noun [ U ] specialized (LANGUAGE)

the fact of a word acting as a modifier of another

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

modification

mod·i·fi·ca·tion /ˌmɑːdəfəˈkeɪʃən/ noun, pl -tions
1 [noncount] : the act or process of changing parts of something : the act or process of modifying something
• The program can be used on all computers without modification.
- often + of
• The bad weather required modification of our travel plans.
2 [count] : a change in something (such as a system or style)
• They passed the law with only a few minor/slight/small modifications.
• The weather required some major/minor modifications to our travel plans.
- often + of or to
• A few modifications of the design might be necessary.
• We made some modifications to the original plan.

odds

odds [noun]

the probability (= how likely it is) that a particular thing will or will not happen

US /ɑːdz/ 
UK /ɒdz/ 

احتمال

مثال: 

If you drive a car all your life, the odds are that you'll have an accident at some point.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

odds

 noun

the odds used for saying how likely something is:
The odds are that he'll win (= he'll probably win).
The odds are against us (= we will probably not succeed).

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

odds

odds S3 AC /ɒdz $ ɑːdz/ BrE AmE noun [plural]
1. PROBABILITYthe odds how likely it is that something will or will not happen:
The odds are (=it is likely) that he will commit the same crime again.
the odds of
You can narrow the odds of a nasty accident happening in your home by being more safety-conscious.
the odds against
The odds against a plane crash are around a million to one.
I’m afraid that the odds are heavily against her winning (=it is not likely).
What are the odds (=how likely is it) that they will mess up?
a new company that has beaten the odds and succeeded (=it was not likely to succeed, but it did)
2. DIFFICULTIES difficulties which make a good result seem very unlikely:
The hospital’s director has been battling against the odds to improve patient care.
The soldiers’ job was to hold on despite impossible odds.
3. be at odds
a) to disagree
be at odds with
Briggs found himself at odds with his colleagues.
be at odds over/on
The two politicians were at odds over what was the truth.
b) if two statements, descriptions, actions etc are at odds with each other, they are different although they should be the same
be at odds with
Mark’s account of what happened is at odds with Dan’s.
She gave him a sweet smile, totally at odds with the look of dislike in her eyes.
4. HORSE RACING ETC the numbers that show how much money you will win if you ↑bet on the winner of a horse race or other competition:
The odds are 6–1.
odds of
At odds of 10–1 he bet a hundred pounds.
(at) long/short odds (=high or low numbers, that show a high or low risk of losing)
Everyone was surprised when Desert Zone won the race, at very long odds.
lay/offer (somebody) odds British English:
They are laying odds of 8–1 that the Conservatives will win the next election.
5. it makes no odds British English spoken used to say that what someone does or what happens is not important:
Pay me now or later – it makes no odds.
6. pay over the odds British English informal to pay a higher price than is usual or reasonable:
Most residents live in tiny apartments and pay over the odds for them too.
• • •
COLLOCATIONS (for Meaning 2)
■ adjectives
enormous/considerable/incredible odds He survived a night in the cold water against incredible odds.
great odds (=a lot of difficulties) We must hope that, despite great odds, we can achieve a peaceful settlement.
impossible/overwhelming odds (=making success seem extremely unlikely) They face impossible odds simply trying to get an education. | They face overwhelming odds in their struggle to preserve the park.
■ verbs
beat/overcome/defy the odds (=succeed despite great difficulties) The baby, born sixteen weeks too early, defied the odds and is celebrating her first birthday.
battle/struggle against the odds (=work hard despite great difficulties) The Coastguard was battling against the odds to keep the oil spill from reaching the shore.
■ phrases
against all odds (=despite something seeming very unlikely) Against all odds, he recovered from his illness.
the odds are stacked against somebody (=there are a lot of difficulties that may prevent someone’s success) They may be able to build a life for themselves, but the odds are stacked against them.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

odds

odds AW   [ɒdz]    [ɑːdz]  noun plural
1. (usually the odds) the degree to which sth is likely to happen
The odds are very much in our favour (= we are likely to succeed).
The odds are heavily against him (= he is not likely to succeed).
The odds are that (= it is likely that) she'll win.

What are the odds (= how likely is it) he won't turn up?

2. something that makes it seem impossible to do or achieve sth
They secured a victory in the face of overwhelming odds.

Against all (the) odds, he made a full recovery.

3. (in betting) the connection between two numbers that shows how much money sb will receive if they win a bet
odds of ten to one (= ten times the amount of money that has been bet by sb will be paid to them if they win)
They are offering long/short odds (= the prize money will be high/low because there is a high/low risk of losing) on the defending champion.
(figurative) I'll lay odds on him getting the job (= I'm sure he will get it).
more at the cards/odds are stacked against youthe cards/odds are stacked in your favour at  stacked
Idioms: at odds  it makes no odds  over the odds  
Word Origin:
[odds] early 16th cent.: apparently the plural of the obsolete noun odd ‘odd number or odd person’.  
Example Bank:
He will try hard to win, although he knows the odds are stacked against him.
I'll lay odds we never see him again.
She defied the odds to beat the clear favourite.
She struggled against terrible odds to overcome her illness.
Sometimes an outsider will win at long odds, but not often.
The bookmakers are offering only short odds on the favourite.
The film is a heart-warming tale of triumph against the odds.
The odds against making a profit in this business are huge.
The odds against their survival have lengthened.
The odds on the outsider were 100–1.
They were offering odds of ten to one.
Against all (the) odds, he made a full recovery.
I put £10 on Middlesbrough to beat Manchester at odds of three to one.
The odds are heavily against him.
The odds are that she'll win.
The odds are very much in our favour.
They are offering long/short odds on the defending champion.

What are the odds he won't turn up?

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

odds / ɒdz /   / ɑːdz / noun [ plural ]

C1 the probability (= how likely it is) that a particular thing will or will not happen:

If you drive a car all your life, the odds are that you'll have an accident at some point.

There are heavy odds against people succeeding in such a bad economic climate.

What are the odds on him being (= do you think he will be) re-elected?

The odds are stacked against a woman succeeding (= it is not likely that a woman will succeed) in the business.

in gambling (= the activity of risking money guessing the result of something) , a probability expressed as a number:

The odds against my horse winning (= that it will not win) / on my horse winning (= that it will win) are a hundred to one.

The odds that the US entrant will win the race are ten to one.

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

odds

[ɒ̱dz]
 1) N-PLURAL: usu the N You refer to how likely something is to happen as the odds that it will happen.
 → See also odds-on
  What are the odds of finding a parking space right outside the door?...
  The odds are that you are going to fail.
  Syn:
  chances
 2) N-PLURAL In betting, odds are expressions with numbers such as `10 to 1' and `7 to 2' that show how likely something is thought to be, for example how likely a particular horse is to lose or win a race.
  Gavin Jones, who put ₤25 on Eugene, at odds of 50 to 1, has won ₤1,250.
 3) PHRASE: usu v-link PHR, oft PHR with n If someone is at odds with someone else, or if two people are at odds, they are disagreeing or quarrelling with each other.
  He was at odds with his Prime Minister...
  An adviser said there was no reason why the two countries should remain at odds.
 4) PHRASE: V inflects, PHR n If you say that the odds are against something or someone, you mean that they are unlikely to succeed.
  He reckoned the odds are against the scheme going ahead...
  I'm sorry. I just feel as if the odds are stacked up against me.
 5) PHRASE: PHR with cl If something happens against all odds, it happens or succeeds although it seemed impossible or very unlikely.
  Some women do manage to achieve business success against all odds...
  Finally, late in life and against considerable odds, she became a nun.
 6) PHRASE: V inflects If you say that the odds are in someone's favour, you mean that they are likely to succeed in what they are doing.
  His troops will only engage in a ground battle when all the odds are in their favour.
 7) PHR-ERG: V inflects To shorten the odds on something happening means to make it more likely to happen. To lengthen the odds means to make it less likely to happen. You can also say that the odds shorten or lengthen.
  His reception there shortened the odds that he might be the next Tory leader.

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

odds

 

odds /ˈɑːdz/ noun [plural]
1 : the possibility that something will happen : the chance that one thing will happen instead of a different thing
• She wanted to improve her odds [=chances] of winning.
• They believe that surgery may increase his odds of survival. [=may make it more likely that he will survive]
• There's a chance it could rain, but odds are that it'll be sunny tomorrow. [=it is more likely to be sunny than rainy tomorrow]
• The team has made some major improvements, but they still face long odds. [=they still are not likely to win]
- often used with the
The odds are good that he'll survive. [=he is likely to survive]
• What are the odds of winning?
• What are the odds that they'll be there on time?
• Smoking increases the odds of getting lung cancer.
The odds are in our favor. [=it is likely that we will succeed]
• She knew that the odds were against her. [=she knew that she was not likely to succeed]
• It could rain tomorrow, but the odds are against it. [=it probably will not rain]
The odds are in favor of a major storm this weekend. [=a major storm is likely this weekend]
2 : conditions that make it difficult for something to happen
• They fought against great/heavy/impossible/overwhelming odds and won.
• He was able to do it, against all odds. [=even though it was very difficult and unlikely]
- often used with the
• They defied/overcame the odds.
Despite/against the odds, she has survived breast cancer.
• I tried to beat the odds. [=to succeed even though I was not likely to succeed]
3 : two numbers that show how much a person can win by betting a certain amount of money
• I bet $1,000 at 4–1 odds. If the horse I bet on wins, I will walk away with $4,000.
• winning at odds of 6–1
at odds : not agreeing with each other : in a state of disagreement
• The parents and teachers are still at odds (about/over what to teach the students).
- often + with
• The two groups have long been at odds with each other.
• He was completely at odds [=he completely disagreed] with the way the problem was being handled.
• The results of the study are at odds with our previous findings.
make no odds Brit informal
- used to say that a choice is not important
• It makes no odds [=makes no difference] to me when we leave.
odds are in favor
- see 1favor
over the odds Brit informal : more than the usual or expected amount
• We had to pay over the odds to get good seats for the concert.
what's the odds? Brit informal
- used to say that something is not likely to have an effect or make a difference
• He'll do it anyway, so what's the odds [=what's the use] of telling him not to?

accomplish

accomplish [verb]

to finish something successfully or to achieve something

US /əˈkɑːm.plɪʃ/ 
UK /əˈkʌm.plɪʃ/ 

انجام‌ دادن‌، به‌ پايان‌ رساندن‌، به‌ نتيجه‌ رساندن‌

مثال: 

The students accomplished the task in less than ten minutes.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

accomplish

 verb (accomplishes, accomplishing, accomplished )
to succeed in doing something difficult that you planned to do same meaning achieve:
The first part of the plan has been safely accomplished.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

accomplish

accomplish /əˈkʌmplɪʃ $ əˈkɑːm-, əˈkʌm-/ BrE AmE verb [transitive]
[Date: 1300-1400; Language: Old French; Origin: acomplir, from Vulgar Latin accomplere, from Latin ad- 'to' + complere ( ⇨ ↑complete1)]
to succeed in doing something, especially after trying very hard SYN achieve:
We have accomplished all we set out to do.
Mission accomplished (=we have done what we intended to do).
• • •
THESAURUS
■ succeed in doing something
succeed verb [intransitive] to do something you tried or wanted to do: Will they succeed in winning the election? | He wanted to make her jealous, and he succeeded.
manage verb [intransitive] to succeed in doing something difficult, after trying hard. Manage to do something is very commonly used instead of succeed in doing something in everyday English: He finally managed to find an apartment near his office. | Don’t worry – I’m sure we’ll manage somehow.
achieve verb [transitive] to succeed in doing something good or important: She’s achieved a lot in the short time she’s been with the company. | If we are to achieve our goals, we have to plan properly.
accomplish verb [transitive] formal to achieve something: The government accomplished its objective of reducing violent crime. | What do you hope to accomplish this year?
make it to be successful in your career, or to succeed in reaching a place or part of a competition: Only a few people make it to the top and become professional singers. | We finally made it to Chicago. | Which two teams will make it to the final?
pull off phrasal verb to succeed in doing something, especially when you could easily have not succeeded. Pull off sounds rather informal: Italy pulled off a great victory over Germany. | I’d never performed on my own before, and wasn’t sure if I could pull it off.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

accomplish

ac·com·plish [accomplish accomplishes accomplished accomplishing]   [əˈkʌmplɪʃ]    [əˈkɑːmplɪʃ]  verb ~ sth
to succeed in doing or completing sth
Syn:  achieve
The first part of the plan has been safely accomplished.
I don't feel I've accomplished very much today.
That's it. Mission accomplished (= we have done what we aimed to do).
 
Word Origin:
late Middle English: from Old French acompliss-, lengthened stem of acomplir, based on Latin ad- ‘to’ + complere ‘to complete’.  
Example Bank:
That's it. Mission accomplished.

I don't feel I've accomplished very much today.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

accomplish / əˈkʌm.plɪʃ /   / -ˈkɑːm- / verb [ T ]

C1 to finish something successfully or to achieve something:

The students accomplished the task in less than ten minutes.

She accomplished such a lot during her visit.

I feel as if I've accomplished nothing since I left my job.

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

accomplish

[əkʌ̱mplɪʃ, AM əkɒ̱m-]
 accomplishes, accomplishing, accomplished
 VERB

 If you accomplish something, you succeed in doing it.
  [V n] If we'd all work together, I think we could accomplish our goal...
  [V n] They are skeptical about how much will be accomplished by legislation.

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

accomplish

ac·com·plish /əˈkɑːmplɪʃ/ verb -plish·es; -plished; -plish·ing [+ obj] : to succeed in doing (something)
• They have accomplished [=done, achieved] much in a very short period of time.
• He finally felt like he had accomplished [=done] something important.
• There are several different ways to accomplish the same task.
• It's amazing what you can accomplish [=do] through/with hard work.
• Exactly what he thought he would accomplish is unclear.
- ac·com·plish·able /əˈkʰɑmplɪʃəbəɫ/ adj [more ~; most ~]

round the clock

round the clock [idiom]

all day and all night

شبانه روزی، ۲۴ ساعته

مثال: 

Doctors and nurses worked round the clock to help those injured in the train crash.

دکترها و پرستاران ۲۴ ساعته کارکردند تا به مجروحان سانحه برخورد قطار کمک کنند.

media: 

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

round-the-clock

ˌround-the-ˈclock BrE AmE adjective [only before noun]
happening all the time, both day and night:
round-the-clock medical care

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

around the clock

around/round the ˈclock idiom

all day and all night without stopping

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

round/around the clock

C1 all day and all night:

Doctors and nurses worked round the clock to help those injured in the train crash.

She needed round-the-clock nursing.

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

10) PHRASE: PHR with v, PHR n If something is done round the clock or around the clock, it is done all day and all night without stopping.
  Rescue services have been working round the clock to free stranded motorists...
  We can't afford to give you around-the-clock protection.

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

around the clock also round the clock : throughout the entire day and night : every hour of the day
• Our stores are now open around the clock. [=our stores are open 24 hours a day]
• Reporters worked around the clock to cover the story.

consciousness

consciousness [noun] (UNDERSTANDING)

the state of understanding and realizing something

US /ˈkɑːn.ʃəs.nəs/ 
UK /ˈkɒn.ʃəs.nəs/ 

آگاهی، خودآگاهی

مثال: 

Her consciousness that she's different makes her feel uneasy.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

consciousness

 noun (no plural)
the state of being able to see, hear, feel and think:
As she fell, she hit her head and lost consciousness.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

consciousness

consciousness W3 /ˈkɒnʃəsnəs, ˈkɒnʃəsnɪs $ ˈkɑːn-/ BrE AmE noun
[Word Family: noun: ↑subconscious, ↑unconscious, ↑consciousness, ↑unconsciousness; adverb: ↑subconsciously, ↑consciously ≠ ↑unconsciously; adjective: ↑conscious ≠ ↑unconscious, ↑subconscious]
1. [uncountable] the condition of being awake and able to understand what is happening around you:
David lost consciousness (=went into a deep sleep) at eight o'clock and died a few hours later.
She could faintly hear voices as she began to regain consciousness (=wake up).
2. [uncountable and countable] your mind and your thoughts:
The painful memories eventually faded from her consciousness.
Hypnosis is an altered state of consciousness.
research into human consciousness
3. [countable] someone’s ideas, feelings, or opinions about politics, life etc:
The experience helped to change her political consciousness.
4. [uncountable] when you know that something exists or is true SYN awareness:
This will increase public consciousness of the pollution issue.
⇨ ↑stream of consciousness
• • •
COLLOCATIONS
■ verbs
lose consciousness (=go into a type of deep sleep that is not normal) As she fell, she hit her head and lost consciousness for several minutes.
regain/recover consciousness (=wake up) I wanted to stay at the hospital until he regained consciousness.
return to consciousness When I returned to consciousness, my head was throbbing with pain.
bring somebody back to consciousness The doctors were unable to bring her back to consciousness.
drift in and out of consciousness (=be awake and then not awake, and then awake again, etc) He had a high temperature and was drifting in and out of consciousness.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

consciousness

con·scious·ness [consciousness]   [ˈkɒnʃəsnəs]    [ˈkɑːnʃəsnəs]  noun uncountable
1. the state of being able to use your senses and mental powers to understand what is happening
I can't remember any more— I must have lost consciousness.

• She did not regain consciousness and died the next day.

2. the state of being aware of sth
Syn:  awareness
• his consciousness of the challenge facing him

class-consciousness (= consciousness  of different classes in society)

3. the ideas and opinions of a person or group
her newly-developed political consciousness
issues affecting the popular consciousness of the time
see also  stream of consciousness  
Example Bank:
He claims that it's a form of false consciousness for working people to vote.
Hip-hop exploded into popular consciousness at the same time as the music video.
I left the room with full consciousness of the impression I would make.
In some cultures shamans use drugs to alter consciousness.
Our role as educators is to develop a critical consciousness among our students.
She hit her head on a rock and lost consciousness.
She sees racism as a form of false consciousness, where a society collectively believes untrue things about other races.
The cold water brought me back to full consciousness.
The idea firmly lodged itself in the public consciousness.
The words slowly entered her consciousness.
These memories became an important component of Polish historical consciousness.
They have succeeded in raising consciousness on many issues.
When she regained consciousness she was in a hospital bed.
a book that has changed cultural consciousness in the US
a change that altered our collective consciousness forever
a decline in civic consciousness and a growing indifference to public affairs
a growing consciousness of environmental issues among children
a key position in feminist consciousness
a new consciousness about the health consequences of pesticides
a new political consciousness among young people
a sense of ethnic consciousness among Lithuanian Americans
an altered state of consciousness
imagery that has entered the national consciousness through the media
powerful states of cosmic consciousness
the modern study of animal consciousness
the practices that are used by yogis to reach divine consciousness
to aspire to a higher consciousness
Her consciousness of the challenge that faced her did not put her off.
In popular consciousness he will always be a hero.
The memory remained deep in his consciousness.
• There has always been a strong social consciousness in the city.

• We need to raise people's consciousness of environmental issues.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

consciousness / ˈkɒn.ʃəs.nəs /   / ˈkɑːn- / noun [ U ] (UNDERSTANDING)

C1 the state of understanding and realizing something:

[ + that ] Her consciousness that she's different makes her feel uneasy.

Working in an unemployment office had helped to raise his political consciousness.

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

consciousness

[kɒ̱nʃəsnəs]
 ♦♦♦
 consciousnesses

 1) N-COUNT: usu sing, usu poss N Your consciousness is your mind and your thoughts.
  That idea has been creeping into our consciousness for some time.
  Syn:
  awareness
 2) N-UNCOUNT: with supp The consciousness of a group of people is their set of ideas, attitudes, and beliefs.
  The Greens were the catalysts of a necessary change in the European consciousness.
  Syn:
  awareness
 3) N-UNCOUNT: supp N You use consciousness to refer to an interest in and knowledge of a particular subject or idea.
  Her political consciousness sprang from her upbringing when her father's illness left the family short of money.
  Syn:
  awareness
 4) N-UNCOUNT Consciousness is the state of being awake rather than being asleep or unconscious. If someone loses consciousness, they become unconscious, and if they regain consciousness, they become conscious after being unconscious.
  She banged her head and lost consciousness...
  He drifted in and out of consciousness.
 5) → See also stream of consciousness

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

consciousness

con·scious·ness /ˈkɑːnʃəsnəs/ noun, pl -ness·es
1 [noncount] : the condition of being conscious : the normal state of being awake and able to understand what is happening around you
• She experienced a brief loss of consciousness. = She lost consciousness [=became unconscious] briefly.
• He slowly regained consciousness [=became conscious again; woke up] after the surgery.
2 a : a person's mind and thoughts

[count]

- usually singular
• The realization first entered my consciousness when I was a young child.
• The memory was forever etched in her consciousness.

[noncount]

• The medication caused her to enter an altered state of consciousness.
- see also stream of consciousness
b [noncount] : knowledge that is shared by a group of people
• The events have become part of the national consciousness.
• a crisis that has faded from the public consciousness [=that the public no longer remembers or thinks about]
3 : awareness or knowledge of something specified

[count]

- usually singular
• a magazine that aims to raise the political consciousness of teenagers [=to make teenagers more aware of political issues]
• I was impressed by his consciousness of our situation.
• She developed a strong social consciousness. [=she became aware of important social issues]

[noncount]

• He hopes that he can raise public consciousness of the disease.

solid

solid [adjective] (COLOUR)

describes a metal or a colour that is pure and does not have anything else mixed together with it

US /ˈsɑː.lɪd/ 
UK /ˈsɒl.ɪd/ 

یکدست

مثال: 

a white rose on a solid blue background

Oxford Essential Dictionary

 adjective

1 hard, not like a liquid or a gas:
Water becomes solid when it freezes.

2 with no empty space inside; made of the same material inside and outside:
a solid rubber ball
This ring is solid gold.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

solid

I. solid1 S3 W3 /ˈsɒləd, ˈsɒlɪd $ ˈsɑː-/ BrE AmE adjective
[Word Family: noun: ↑solid, ↑solidarity, ↑solidity, solids, ↑solidification; verb: ↑solidify; adverb: ↑solidly; adjective: ↑solid]
[Date: 1300-1400; Language: Old French; Origin: solide, from Latin solidus]
1. FIRM/HARD hard or firm, with a fixed shape, and not a liquid or gas:
The lake was frozen solid.
It was good to be back on solid ground again.
Is the baby eating solid food (=bread, meat etc) yet?
The ship’s sonar can detect the presence of solid objects in the water.
2. ONLY ONE MATERIAL consisting completely of one type of material
solid gold/silver etc
a solid gold cup
solid wood/pine/oak etc
a chest made of solid oak
3. NOT HOLLOW having no holes or spaces inside OPP hollow:
a solid rubber ball
a shrine carved out of solid rock
4. WITHOUT SPACES continuous, without any spaces or breaks:
It’s not safe to pass when the lines in the middle of the road are solid.
5. STRONGLY MADE strong and well made OPP flimsy:
a solid piece of furniture
The frame is as solid as a rock (=extremely solid).
6. GOOD AND LONG-LASTING a solid achievement or solid work is of real, practical, and continuing value:
five years of solid achievement
The first two years provide a solid foundation in the basics of computing.
7. DEPENDABLE someone or something that is solid can be depended on or trusted SYN sound:
a solid reputation
The prosecution in this case has no solid evidence.
You can rely on Wylie for good solid advice.
a solid Labour stronghold (=where people always vote for this party)
8. CONTINUING WITHOUT INTERRUPTION informal used to emphasize that something continues for a long time without any pauses:
The lecture lasted two solid hours.
five hours/two weeks etc solid
On Saturday I went to bed and slept fourteen hours solid.
9. packed solid informal if shops, trains, buses etc are packed solid, they are full of people
10. on solid ground confident because you are dealing with a subject you are sure about, or because you are in a safe situation:
To make sure that he was on solid ground, he confirmed his findings with others.
11. GOOD British English informal good
12. DIFFICULT British English informal very difficult:
I couldn’t do any of the maths last night – it was solid.
13. SHAPE technical having length, width, and height SYN three-dimensional:
A sphere is a solid figure.
14. IN AGREEMENT be solid British English to be in complete agreement:
The workers are 100% solid on this issue.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

solid

solid [solid solids solider solidest] adjective, noun   [ˈsɒlɪd]    [ˈsɑːlɪd]

adjective  

NOT LIQUID/GAS
1. hard or firm; not in the form of a liquid or gas
The planet Jupiter may have no solid surface at all.
The boat bumped against a solid object.
She had refused all solid food.
It was so cold that the stream had frozen solid.

The boiler uses solid fuel.  

WITHOUT HOLES OR SPACES

2. having no holes or spaces inside; not hollow
They were drilling through solid rock.

The stores are packed solid (= very full and crowded) at this time of year.  

 

STRONG

3. strong and made well

These chains seem fairly solid.  

 

RELIABLE

4. that you can rely on; having a strong basis
As yet, they have no solid evidence.
His advice was always solid and practical.
This provided a solid foundation for their marriage.

The Irish team were solid as a rock in defence.  

 

GOOD BUT NOT SPECIAL

5. definitely good and steady but perhaps not excellent or special
2008 was a year of solid achievement.

He's a solid player.  

 

MATERIAL

6. only before noun made completely of the material mentioned (that is, the material is not only on the surface)

a solid gold bracelet  

 

PERIOD OF TIME

7. (informal) without a pause; continuous
The essay represents a solid week's work.

It rained for two hours solid this afternoon.  

 

COLOUR

8. of the colour mentioned and no other colour

One cat is black and white, the other solid black.  

SHAPE

9. (geometry) a shape that is solid has length, width and height and is not flat

A cube is a solid figure.  

IN AGREEMENT

10. in complete agreement; agreed on by everyone
The department was solid against the changes.
The strike was solid, supported by all the members.
see also  rock solid  
Word Origin:
late Middle English: from Latin solidus; related to salvus ‘safe’ and sollus ‘entire’.  
Thesaurus:
solid adj.
1.
The stream was frozen solid.
hardstiffrigid|approving firm
Opp: liquid
solid/stiff/rigid material
a solid/hard/firm surface
2.
She always gives solid and practical advice.
goodsoundvalidlogicalwell founded
Opp: flimsy
a solid/good/sound/valid/logical reason/basis
solid/good/sound/valid evidence
solid/good/sound advice
3. only before noun
a bracelet made of solid gold
purerefined
Opp: hollow
solid/pure/refined silver/gold  
Example Bank:
Support for the plan remained rock solid.
The ice felt solid enough.
The songwriting quality is consistently solid.
The water was frozen solid.
There is pretty solid evidence to show that the disease is caused by poor hygiene.
2006 was a year of solid achievement.
A solid silver bracelet was among the items up for auction.
Each piece is individually made in solid gold.
He flung open the solid wood door.
He's a good, solid player.
Her advice is always solid and practical.
It was so cold that the stream had frozen solid.
The boiler uses solid fuel.
The door was solid as rock.
Their friendship provided a solid foundation for their future together.
There's solid evidence to show he wasn't there when the crime took place.
Trade remained solid throughout the year.

Under her bare toes the floor felt real and solid.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition

C1 describes a metal or a colour that is pure and does not have anything else mixed together with it:

solid gold/silver candlesticks

a white rose on a solid blue background

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

solid

[sɒ̱lɪd]
 ♦♦♦
 solids

 1) ADJ: usu ADJ n A solid substance or object stays the same shape whether it is in a container or not.
  ...the potential of greatly reducing our solid waste problem...
  He did not eat solid food for several weeks.
  Ant:
  liquid
 2) N-COUNT A solid is a substance that stays the same shape whether it is in a container or not.
  Solids turn to liquids at certain temperatures...
  No baby should be given any solids before four months old.
  Ant:
  liquid
 3) ADJ-GRADED A substance that is solid is very hard or firm.
  The snow had melted, but the lake was still frozen solid...
  The concrete will stay as solid as a rock.
 4) ADJ: usu ADJ n A solid object or mass does not have a space inside it, or holes or gaps in it.
  ...a tunnel carved through 50ft of solid rock.
  ...a solid wall of multicoloured trees.
  ...a solid mass of colour...
  The car park was absolutely packed solid with people.
 5) ADJ: ADJ n If an object is made of solid gold or solid wood, for example, it is made of gold or wood all the way through, rather than just on the outside.
  The taps appeared to be made of solid gold.
  ...solid wood doors.
  ...solid pine furniture.
 6) ADJ-GRADED A structure that is solid is strong and is not likely to collapse or fall over.
  Banks are built to look solid to reassure their customers...
  The car feels very solid.
  Derived words:
  solidly ADV-GRADED ADV with v Their house, which was solidly built, resisted the main shock.
  solidity [səlɪ̱dɪti] N-UNCOUNT ...the solidity of walls and floors.
 7) ADJ-GRADED (approval) If you describe someone as solid, you mean that they are very reliable and respectable.
  You want a husband who is solid and stable, someone who will devote himself to you...
  All the band come from good, solid, working-class backgrounds...
  Mr Zuma had a solid reputation as a grass roots organiser.
  Syn:
  reliable, dependable
  Derived words:
  solidly ADV-GRADED Graham is so solidly consistent.
  solidity N-UNCOUNT He had the proverbial solidity of the English.
 8) ADJ-GRADED Solid evidence or information is reliable because it is based on facts.
  We don't have good solid information on where the people are...
  Some solid evidence was what was required...
  He has a solid alibi.
  Syn:
  reliable
 9) ADJ-GRADED You use solid to describe something such as advice or a piece of work which is useful and reliable.
  The CIU provides churches with solid advice on a wide range of subjects...
  All I am looking for is a good solid performance...
  I've always felt that solid experience would stand me in good stead.
  Syn:
  sound
  Derived words:
  solidly ADV-GRADED ADV with v She's played solidly throughout the spring.
 10) ADJ-GRADED You use solid to describe something such as the basis for a policy or support for an organization when it is strong, because it has been developed carefully and slowly.
  I am determined to build on this solid foundation.
  ...a Democratic nominee with solid support within the party and broad appeal beyond.
  ...Washington's attempt to build a solid international coalition.
  Syn:
  firm, strong
  Derived words:
  solidly ADV-GRADED ADV adj/prep, ADV with v The Los Alamos district is solidly Republican... So far, majority public opinion in Egypt seems solidly behind the government's policy. ...a society based solidly on trust and understanding.
  solidity N-UNCOUNT ...doubts over the solidity of European backing for the American approach.
 11) ADJ: ADJ n, -ed ADJ If you do something for a solid period of time, you do it without any pause or interruption throughout that time.
  We had worked together for two solid years.
  Derived words:
  solidly ADV-GRADED ADV with v People who had worked solidly since Christmas enjoyed the chance of a Friday off.

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

1sol·id /ˈsɑːləd/ adj
1 : firm or hard : not having the form of a gas or liquid
• Concrete is a solid material.
• particles of solid matter
• When ice melts, it passes from a solid to a liquid form.
• I was on a liquid diet when I was sick because I couldn't digest solid food.
• His muscles are very solid. [=hard]
• I was glad to get off the plane and back on solid ground.
• The pond was frozen solid.
2 : having no space inside : not hollow
• a solid rubber ball
• a solid object
3 a always used before a noun : made entirely from the specified material
• The ring is solid gold/silver.
solid oak/cherry/mahogany furniture
• a chunk of solid marble/granite
b : consisting only of the color specified or only of one color
• I prefer solid colors like blue or green instead of plaids and stripes.
see color picture 
4 : having no breaks, spaces, or pauses
• The road was divided by a solid yellow line.
• We talked for three solid hours. [=we talked for three hours without stopping]
- often used figuratively
• The rain fell in solid sheets. [=the rain fell very heavily]
• The stores are always packed solid [=very crowded] during the holidays.
• The hotels in the city were booked solid for the conference.
5 [more ~; most ~]
a : good and able to be trusted to do or provide what is needed
• He plays solid defense.
• The team's defense is very solid.
• She gave a solid performance.
• She's a good, solid player.
b : having a strong basis : good and dependable
• His friend gave him some good, solid advice.
• The company has built/established a solid reputation.
• She had solid reasons for her decision.
• Students need a solid foundation in language skills.
• The prosecution has no solid evidence.
• He had a solid alibi.
• Financially, the company is (as) solid as a rock. [=the company is in very good condition]
6 [more ~; most ~] : strong and well-made
solid furniture
• This chair is very solid.
7 US : agreeing with or supporting something (such as a political party) in a completely loyal and dependable way
• She is a solid Democrat/Republican.
8 geometry : having length, width, and height : three-dimensional
• a solid geometric figure
- sol·id·ly adv
solidly constructed furniture
• a solidly built athlete
• She put her feet solidly [=securely] on the ground.
• Her reputation was solidly established.
• a solidly Republican area/suburb [=an area/suburb where most people vote for Republicans]
• Environmentalists were solidly [=completely] opposed to drilling in the area.
• The quarterback played solidly during the second half.
- sol·id·ness noun [noncount]

self-conscious

self-conscious [adjective]

nervous or uncomfortable because you know what people think about you or your actions

US /ˌselfˈkɑːn.ʃəs/ 
UK /ˌselfˈkɒn.ʃəs/ 

خودآگاه

مثال: 

He looked uncomfortable, like a self-conscious adolescent.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

self-conscious

 adjective
worried about what other people think of you:
She walked into her new school feeling very self-conscious.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

self-conscious

ˌself-ˈconscious BrE AmE adjective
1. worried and embarrassed about what you look like or what other people think of you
self-conscious about
Jerry’s pretty self-conscious about his weight.
2. self-conscious art, writing etc shows that the artist etc is paying too much attention to how the public will react to their work
—self-consciously adverb:
The boys posed rather self-consciously for the photo.
—self-consciousness noun [uncountable]

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

self-conscious

ˌself-ˈconscious [self-conscious self-consciously self-consciousness]       adjective
1. ~ (about sth) nervous or embarrassed about your appearance or what other people think of you
• He's always been self-conscious about being so short.

• She was a shy, self-conscious girl.

2. (often disapproving) done in a way that shows you are aware of the effect that is being produced
The humour of the play is self-conscious and contrived.
Opp:  unselfconscious 
Derived Words: self-consciously  self-consciousness  
Example Bank:
He studied her in a way that made her very self-conscious.
• He's always been self-conscious about being so short.

• Taken aback by her frankness, he gave a little self-conscious laugh.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

ˌ self- ˈ conscious / ˌselfˈkɒn.ʃəs /   / -ˈkɑːn- / adjective

C1 nervous or uncomfortable because you know what people think about you or your actions:

He looked uncomfortable, like a self-conscious adolescent.

 

ˌ self- ˈ consciously / ˌselfˈkɒn.ʃəs.li /   / -ˈkɑːn- / adverb

 

ˌ self- ˈ consciousness / ˌselfˈkɒn.ʃəs.nəs /   / -ˈkɑːn- / noun [ U ]

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

self-conscious

 1) ADJ-GRADED: usu v-link ADJ, oft ADJ about n Someone who is self-conscious is easily embarrassed and nervous because they feel that everyone is looking at them and judging them.
  I felt a bit self-conscious in my swimming costume...
  Bess was self-conscious about being shorter than her two friends.
  Derived words:
  self-consciously ADV-GRADED ADV with v I glanced down at my dress jacket a little self-consciously... She was fiddling self-consciously with her wedding ring.
  self-consciousness N-UNCOUNT ...her painful self-consciousness.
 2) ADJ-GRADED If you describe someone or something as self-conscious, you mean that they are strongly aware of who or what they are. [FORMAL]
  They were forged by them, moreover, into a self-conscious nation as early as the 10th century...
  Putting the work together is a very self-conscious process.
  Derived words:
  self-consciously ADV-GRADED ADV adj The world which the book inhabits seems too self-consciously literary, too introverted... The place is as self-consciously trendy as they come.

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

self-conscious

self–con·scious /ˌsɛlfˈkɑːnʃəs/ adj [more ~; most ~]
1 : uncomfortably nervous about or embarrassed by what other people think about you
• She's self-conscious whenever she has to give a speech.
- often + about
• He's very self-conscious about his appearance.
2 usually disapproving : done in a way that shows an awareness of the effect that is produced : done in a deliberate way
• the self-conscious irony in the play
• a self-conscious attempt to win people's sympathy
- self–con·scious·ly adv
• He self-consciously smoothed his hair.
- self–con·scious·ness noun [noncount]

self-centred

self-centred [adjective]

only interested in yourself and your own activities

US /ˌselfˈsen.t̬ɚd/ 
UK /ˌselfˈsen.təd/ 

خودبین، خودمحور، خودخواه

مثال: 

Robert is a self-centred, ambitious, and bigoted man.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

self-centred

ˌself-ˈcentred BrE AmE British English, self-centered American English adjective
paying so much attention to yourself that you do not notice what is happening to other people SYN selfish
—self-centredness noun [uncountable]

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

self-centred

ˌself-ˈcentred [self-centred self-centredness]       (especially US ˌself-ˈcentered) adjective (disapproving)
tending to think only about yourself and not thinking about the needs or feelings of other people
Derived Word: self-centredness
See also: self-centeredness  
Example Bank:
a somewhat self-centred individual
She's completely self-centred.

Your father's too self-centred to care what you do.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

ˌ self- ˈ centred UK disapproving ( US ˌ self- ˈ centered ) / ˌselfˈsen.təd /   / -t̬ɚd / adjective

C1 only interested in yourself and your own activities:

Robert is a self-centred, ambitious, and bigoted man.

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

self-centred

 ADJ-GRADED (disapproval)
 Someone who is self-centred is only concerned with their own wants and needs and never thinks about other people.
  He was selfish, he was self-centred, he was stingy, but he wasn't cruel.(in AM, use self-centered)

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