American English

sometimes

sometimes [adverb]

on some occasions but not always or often

گاهی، بعضی وقتها

مثال: 

Sometimes we take food with us and sometimes we buy food when we're there.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

sometimes

 adverb
not very often:
He sometimes writes to me.
Sometimes I drive to work and sometimes I go by bus.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

  sometimes

sometimes S1 W1 /ˈsʌmtaɪmz/ BrE AmE adverb
on some occasions but not always ⇨ occasionally:
I sometimes have to work late.
Sometimes, Grandma would tell us stories about her childhood in Italy.
‘Do you ever wish you were back in Japan?’ ‘Sometimes. Not very often.’
The journey takes an hour, sometimes even longer.
• • •
THESAURUS
sometimes on some occasions but not always: Sometimes, I wish I was still living in Tokyo. | He sometimes plays football with my brother.
occasionally (also on occasion written) used about something that only happens a few times. Occasionally is used when something happens more rarely than sometimes: I prefer trousers but I do wear skirts occasionally. | Occasionally, operations have to be cancelled. | On occasion, prisoners were allowed visits from their families.
(every) now and then/again (also from time to time) sometimes but not often or regularly: We still call each other every now and then. | Every now and again, an invention comes along which changes people's lives completely. | Even experienced doctors make mistakes from time to time.
every so often sometimes at fairly regular periods: He looked up from his book every so often. | Every so often, a train whizzed past.
at times if something happens at times, it happens sometimes but is not what usually happens: The job can be frustrating at times. | At times I've wondered whether I made the right decision in moving here.
(every) once in a while sometimes but very rarely: We only see each other every once in a while.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

sometimes

some·times   [ˈsʌmtaɪmz]    [ˈsʌmtaɪmz]  adverb
occasionally rather than all of the time
Sometimes I go by car.
He sometimes writes to me.
I like to be on my own sometimes.  
Thesaurus:
sometimes [sometimes] adv.
the cafe where he sometimes has lunch
occasionallyat timesfrom time to timenow and again/thenon occasion(s)once in a whileevery so oftenoff and on/on and off
appear/wonder sometimes/occasionally/at times/from time to time
happen sometimes/occasionally/at times/from time to time/now and again
think sometimes/at times/from time to time that… 
Example Bank:
It is sometimes difficult to know where to begin.
It was the cafe where he sometimes had lunch.
National boundaries have changed, sometimes dramatically, over the last hundred years.
She sometimes goes away at weekends.
Sometimes I look at him and wonder what is going on in his mind.
• Sometimes I think we'll never see each other again.

• They played tennis and golf and sometimes went swimming.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

sometimes / ˈsʌm.taɪmz / adverb

A1 on some occasions but not always or often:

Sometimes we take food with us and sometimes we buy food when we're there.

Sometimes it's best not to say anything.

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

sometimes

[sʌ̱mtaɪmz]
 ADV: ADV with cl/group, ADV with v
 You use sometimes to say that something happens on some occasions rather than all the time.
  During the summer, my skin sometimes gets greasy...
  Sometimes I think he dislikes me...
  You must have noticed how tired he sometimes looks...
  Other people's jobs were exactly the same - sometimes good, sometimes bad.

 

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

sometimes

some·times /ˈsʌmˌtaɪmz/ adv : at certain times : occasionally
• His jokes are funny, but sometimes he goes too far.
Sometimes I take the bus to work.
• We all make mistakes sometimes.
• She works nine hours a day, sometimes more than that.
• The word is sometimes used figuratively.a

walk away

walk away [phrasal verb] (DIFFICULT SITUATION)

to stop being involved in a situation because it is difficult to deal with or does not give you any advantages

سرباز زدن، شانه خالی کردن

مثال: 

You can't just walk away from a marriage at the first sign of a problem.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

walk away

walk away phrasal verb (see also ↑walk)
1. to leave a bad or difficult situation, instead of trying to make it better
walk away from
You can’t just walk away from 15 years of marriage!
When the business started to have problems, it was very tempting to walk away.
2. to come out of an accident or very bad situation without being harmed:
Miraculously, both drivers walked away without a scratch.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

walk away (from somebody)

ˌwalk aˈway (from sb/sth) derived
to leave a difficult situation or relationship, etc. instead of staying and trying to deal with it
• He was tempted to walk away from the problem.

Main entry: walkderived

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

walk away disapproving (DIFFICULT SITUATION) — phrasal verb with walk / wɔːk /   / wɑːk / verb

to stop being involved in a situation because it is difficult to deal with or does not give you any advantages:

You can't just walk away from a marriage at the first sign of a problem.

 

walk away (ACCIDENT) — phrasal verb with walk / wɔːk /   / wɑːk / verb

to escape an accident without being badly hurt:

She overturned the car, but walked away from it without a scratch .
 

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

walk away

 PHRASAL VERB
 If you walk away from a problem or a difficult situation, you do nothing about it or do not face any bad consequences from it.
  [V P from n] The most appropriate strategy may simply be to walk away from the problem...
  [V P] No one knows you're a part of this. You can just walk away.

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

walk away [phrasal verb]
1 : to decide not to do or be involved in something
• If you don't like the deal, you can just walk away.
- often + from
• He walked away from a chance to play professional baseball to join the Peace Corps.
• You can't just walk away from your responsibilities!
• She is not one to walk away from a challenge.
2 walk away with (something) informal : to win (something) especially in a easy way
• She walked away with the election.
• He walked away with first place.
• She had the winning ticket and walked away with $50,000!

great

great [adjective] (FAMOUS)

famous, powerful, or important as one of a particular type

معتبر، با اهمیت

مثال: 

a great politician/leader/artist/man/woman

Oxford Essential Dictionary

great

 adjective (greater, greatest)

pronunciation
The word great sounds like late.

1 very large:
It's a great pleasure to meet you.

2 important or special:
Einstein was a great scientist.

3 (informal) very; very good:
He knows a great many people.
There's a great big dog in the garden!
They are great friends.

4 (informal) very nice or enjoyable same meaning wonderful:
I had a great weekend.
It's great to see you!

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

great

I. great1 S1 W1 /ɡreɪt/ BrE AmE adjective (comparative greater, superlative greatest)
[Word Family: noun: ↑greatness, ↑great; adverb: ↑greatly; adjective: ↑great]
[Language: Old English]
1. LARGE [usually before noun] very large in amount or degree:
The movie was a great success.
The news came as possibly the greatest shock of my life.
The paintings cost a great deal (=a lot) of money.
John always takes great care over his work.
It gives me great pleasure (=I am very pleased) to introduce tonight’s speaker.
It’s a great pity that none of his poems survive.
The temptation was too great to resist.
2. EXCELLENT especially spoken
very good SYN wonderful, fantastic:
The weather here is great.
It’s great to be home.
a great day out for all the family
sound/taste/smell/feel etc great
I worked out this morning and I feel great.
You look great in that dress.
great for doing something
Email’s great for keeping in touch.
the great thing about somebody/something (=the very good thing about someone or something)
The great thing about Alex is that he’s always willing to explain things to you.
3. IMPORTANT
a) [usually before noun] important or having a lot of influence:
one of the greatest scientific achievements of our time
What makes a novel truly great?
great historical events
b) used in the title of a person or event that was very important in the past
Peter/Catherine etc the Great
I’m reading a biography of Alexander the Great.
the Great Depression
the Great War old-fashioned (=World War I)
4. GENEROUS very good or generous in a way that people admire:
a great humanitarian gesture
5. EXTREMELY SKILFUL famous for being able to do something extremely well:
Ali was undoubtedly one of the greatest boxers of all time.
a book about the lives of the great composers
6. BIG written very big SYN huge:
A great crowd had gathered.
A great iron stove filled half the room.
7. great big spoken very big:
Get your great big feet off my table!
8. DOING SOMETHING A LOT used to emphasize that someone does something a lot
a great talker/reader/admirer etc
Anthony’s a great talker – sometimes you just can’t get a word in.
Len was a great believer in the power of positive thinking.
be a great one for doing something
She’s a great one for telling stories about her schooldays.
9. to a greater or lesser extent used to emphasize that something is always true, even though it is more true or noticeable in some situations than others:
Most companies operate in conditions that are to a greater or lesser extent competitive.
10. be no great shakes informal to not be very good, interesting, or skilful:
The work’s no great shakes, but at least I’m earning.
11. be going great guns informal to be doing something extremely well:
After a slow start, the Tigers are going great guns.
12. BAD spoken informal used when you are disappointed or annoyed about something:
‘Daniel’s cancelled the party.’ ‘Oh great!’
13. ANIMAL/BIRD/PLANT ETC used in the names of some animals or plants, especially when they are bigger than other animals or plants of the same type:
the Great Crested Grebe
14. the great outdoors informal the countryside, considered as enjoyable and healthy:
He had a taste for adventure and the great outdoors.
15. great minds (think alike) spoken used humorously when you and another person have had the same idea
16. the greater good a general advantage that you can only gain by losing or harming something that is considered less important:
Some wars are fought for the greater good.
17. the great apes the different types of animals that are similar to large monkeys, considered as a group:
Alone of the great apes, the gorilla is not very efficient at using tools.
18. the great divide a situation in which there is a big difference between groups in society, areas of a country etc, for example a big difference between their wealth or attitudes:
The great divide between north and south seems to be as unbridgeable as ever.
19. Greater London/Los Angeles/Manchester etc London, Los Angeles etc and its outer areas
20. huge/enormous great British English spoken used to emphasize how big something is
21. great Scott!/great Heavens! spoken old-fashioned used to express shock or surprise
22. great with child literary very soon to have a baby
—greatness noun [uncountable]:
She was destined for greatness.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

great / ɡreɪt / adjective approving (FAMOUS)

B2 famous, powerful, or important as one of a particular type:

a great politician/leader/artist/man/woman

This is one of Rembrandt's greatest paintings.

Who do you think is the greatest modern novelist?

 

 

great / ɡreɪt / adjective (BIG)

A2 large in amount, size, or degree:

an enormous great hole

A great crowd had gathered outside the president's palace.

The improvement in water standards over the last 50 years has been very great.

A great many people would agree.

The great majority of (= almost all) people would agree.

formal It gives us great pleasure to announce the engagement of our daughter Maria.

formal It is with great sorrow that I inform you of the death of our director.

I have great sympathy for you.

I spent a great deal of time there.

[ before noun ] used in names, especially to mean large or important:

a Great Dane (= large type of dog)

Catherine the Great

the Great Wall of China

the Great Bear (= group of stars)

 

great / ɡreɪt / adjective (EXTREME)

B1 extreme:

great success/difficulty

 

 

great / ɡreɪt / adjective (GOOD)

A1 informal very good:

a great idea

We had a great time last night at the party.

It 's great to see you after all this time!

"I'll lend you the car if you like." "Great! Thanks a lot!"

"What's your new teacher like?" "Oh, he's great."

"How are you feeling now?" "Great."

informal used to mean that something is very bad:

Oh great ! That's all I need - more bills!

 

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

great

[gre͟ɪt]
 
 greater, greatest, greats

 1) ADJ-GRADED: ADJ n You use great to describe something that is very large. Great is more formal than big.
  The room had a great bay window.
  ...a great hall as long and high as a church.
 2) ADJ-GRADED Great means large in amount or degree.
  I'll take great care of it...
  Benjamin Britten did not live to a great age.
 3) ADJ-GRADED You use great to describe something that is important, famous, or exciting.
  ...the great cultural achievements of the past...
  America can be great again.
  Derived words:
  greatness N-UNCOUNT A nation must take certain risks to achieve greatness.
 4) ADJ-GRADED: usu ADJ n You can describe someone who is successful and famous for their actions, knowledge, or skill as great.
  Wes Hall was once one of the West Indies' great cricketers.
  ...the great George Padmore.
  Derived words:
  greatness N-UNCOUNT Abraham Lincoln achieved greatness.
 5) N-PLURAL: with supp The greats in a particular subject or field of activity are the people who have been most successful or famous in it. [JOURNALISM]
  ...all the greats of Hollywood.
  ...cycling's all-time greats.
 6) N-PLURAL The greats of popular modern music are records that have been successful and that continue to be popular. [JOURNALISM]
  ...a medley of rock'n'roll greats.
 7) ADJ (approval) If you describe someone or something as great, you approve of them or admire them. [INFORMAL]
  Arturo has this great place in Cazadero...
  They're a great bunch of guys...
  I think she's great.
 8) ADJ: feel ADJ If you feel great, you feel very healthy, energetic, and enthusiastic.
  I feel just great.
 9) ADJ-GRADED (emphasis) You use great in order to emphasize the size or degree of a characteristic or quality.
  ...a great big Italian wedding.
  ...her sense of colour and great eye for detail.
 10) EXCLAM (feelings) You say great in order to emphasize that you are pleased or enthusiastic about something.
  Oh great! That'll be good for Fergus.
 11) EXCLAM (feelings) You say great in order to emphasize that you are angry or annoyed about something.
  `Oh great,' I thought. `Just what I need.'
 12) N-IN-NAMES Great is used as part of the name of a species of plant or animal when there is another species of the same plant or animal which is smaller and has different characteristics.
 → See also greater
  ...the great bustard.

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

1great /ˈgreɪt/ adj great·er; -est
1 a : very large in size : very big
• all creatures great and small
- usually used before a noun
• a great beast
• We were surprised by the great size of the auditorium.
• They traveled through a great stretch of wilderness.
• a great cloud of smoke
• A great crowd had formed in the city square.
• the Great Wall of China
• the Great Lakes
• (US) The house has a large great room. [=a large room used for several different purposes]
• (informal) They live in a great big house. [=a very large house]
• (chiefly Brit) a huge/whopping great elephant
b
- used in the names of animals that are larger than similar animals
• the great white shark
• the great horned owl
2 : very large in amount or extent
• The project will require a great amount of time and money.
• He lived to a great age. [=he lived to be very old]
• The show was a great [=big, huge] success.
• It's been a great [=long] while since we last saw them.
• He amassed a great [=large] fortune.
• The building was restored at great expense.
• a great quantity of fish
• He explained in great [=much] detail how they had met.
• These topics need to be discussed in greater [=more] depth and at greater length.
• Our speed/strength/power became greater (and greater) as we went on.
• He made a great deal of money. [=he made a large amount of money]
• Things could be a great deal worse. [=things could be much worse]
• He is supported by the great majority of voters. [=by most voters]
3 a : very strong
• The low cost of these products gives them great appeal.
• There is a very great need for reform.
• They're in no great hurry to finish.
• There is a great demand for his services.
• She takes a great [=considerable] interest in everything her children do.
• an actress of great charm
• with great [=strongly felt] sadness/admiration/love
• Is there any love greater than that between parent and child?
• The whole matter must be treated with great care. [=very carefully]
• His comments are true to a great extent. [=most of his comments are true]
• This new tax affects everyone to a greater or lesser degree/extent. [=to some degree/extent]
b
- used for emphasis before a noun that describes someone
• I've always been a great admirer of his work. [=I have always admired his work very much]
• They are great friends. [=they are very friendly]
• I'm a great believer in the value of patience. [=I believe very much in the value of patience]
c : very important
• This room is only used for great occasions. [=grand occasions, very important and formal occasions]
d : very bad : very extreme or severe
• The storm caused great damage/destruction.
• He was obviously in great pain/discomfort.
• She has suffered a great loss.
• It would be a great mistake to ignore these problems.
• a great disaster/misfortune
great difficulties
• a very great error
4 : better than good: such as
a : of the highest quality
great (works of) art/literature
great music
b : very important and admired
• a great poet/artist
• a great leader/scientist/thinker/woman
• He was a great but flawed man.
• a great discovery/invention
great achievements
c : very talented or successful
• My brother is a great golfer.
• She's a great judge of character.
• My brother is great at (playing) golf. [=my brother plays golf very well]
• She is great at Chinese cooking.
d informal : very enjoyable, favorable, etc. : excellent
• “How was the movie?” “It was (really) great!”
• It was the greatest.
• The movie got great reviews.
• We are having great weather this summer.
• We had a great time on our vacation.
• a great party/lecture/performance
• an actress with great [=very good-looking] legs
• It's great to see you again. = It's great seeing you again.
• This restaurant is great for a quick meal. = This is a great restaurant for a quick meal.
• The food tastes great!
Great work, everybody!
• “I've passed the exam!” “That's great!”
- often used in the phrases feel great and look great
• You look great in that hat. = That hat looks great on you.
• Things aren't looking so great at this point.
• He came home early because he wasn't feeling too great. [=he wasn't feeling well]
• I feel great just being with her!
- sometimes used in an ironic way to describe something that is very bad or upsetting
• “I can't find the tickets.” “That's (just) great! What are we supposed to do now?”
• Oh, great. Now I've lost the tickets.
5 always used before a noun : more distant in a family relationship by one generation
• My great aunt/uncle is my father's/mother's aunt/uncle.
- usually used in combination
• My great-grandfather is my grandfather's father.
• My great-great-grandmother is my great-grandfather's mother.
• a gift sent to Great-Uncle Mike
a great one for informal
✦If you are a great one for (doing) something, you do it often or enjoy doing it very much.
• He's a great one for (playing) golf.
• She's a great one for getting other people to do her work.
go great guns
- see 1gun
go to great pains
- see 1pain
great with child old-fashioned + literary : pregnant
no great shakes
- see 2shake

cease

cease [verb]

to stop something

متوقف شدن، متوقف کردن

مثال: 

The company has decided to cease all UK operations after this year.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

cease

 verb (ceases, ceasing, ceased ) (formal)
to stop:
Fighting in the area has now ceased.

 

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

cease

I. cease1 W3 AC /siːs/ BrE AmE verb [intransitive and transitive]
[Word Family: noun: ↑cessation, ↑cease; verb: ↑cease; adverb: ↑ceaselessly; adjective: ↑ceaseless]
[Date: 1300-1400; Language: Old French; Origin: cesser, from Latin cessare 'to delay', from cedere; ⇨ ↑cede]
1. formal to stop doing something or stop happening
cease to do something
He ceased to be a member of the association.
The things people will do for charity never cease to amaze me (=I am always surprised by them).
cease doing something
the decision to cease using CFCs in packaging
The rain ceased and the sky cleared.
cease trading/production/operations etc (=stop operating a business)
The company ceased production at their Norwich plant last year.
cease fire! (=used to order soldiers to stop shooting)
REGISTER
In everyday English, people usually use stop rather than cease:
▪ They have stopped using CFCs in packaging.
▪ The rain stopped just as the fireworks began.
2. cease and desist law to stop doing something
⇨ ↑ceasefire, ⇨ wonders will never cease at ↑wonder2(5)

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

cease / siːs / verb [ I or T ] formal

B2 to stop something:

Whether the protests will cease remains to be seen.

The company has decided to cease all UK operations after this year.

[ + to infinitive ] Workplace nurseries will cease to be liable for tax.

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

cease

[si͟ːs]
 ♦♦♦
 ceases, ceasing, ceased

 1) VERB If something ceases, it stops happening or existing. [FORMAL]
  At one o'clock the rain had ceased.
  Syn:
  stop
 2) VERB If you cease to do something, you stop doing it. [FORMAL]
  [V to-inf] He never ceases to amaze me...
  [V to-inf] The secrecy about the President's condition had ceased to matter...
  [V -ing] A small number of firms have ceased trading.
 3) VERB If you cease something, you stop it happening or working. [FORMAL]
  [V n] The Tundra Times, a weekly newspaper in Alaska, ceased publication this week.
  Syn:
  stop

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

cease

cease /ˈsiːs/ verb ceas·es; ceased; ceas·ing formal
1 [no obj] : to stop happening : to end
• The fighting along the border has temporarily ceased.
• The conversation abruptly ceased. [=halted]
• The noise ceased [=stopped] altogether.
• when the weary cease from their labors [=when people who are very tired stop working]
• The company was ordered by the court to cease and desist from selling the photographs. [=was ordered to immediately stop selling the photographs]
- see also cease and desist order
2 [+ obj] : to stop doing (something)
• The factory ceased operations last year.
• The child would not cease his constant whining/complaining.
• The soldiers were ordered to cease fire. [=to stop shooting their weapons]
- often followed by to + verb
• The program would cease to exist without private funding.
• He had long ceased to have any regrets.
• Her courage never ceases to amaze me. [=I am always amazed by her courage]
- see also cease-fire
wonders never cease
- see 1wonder

progressive

progressive [adjective] (GRADUAL)

developing or happening gradually

پيش‌رونده

مثال: 

There's been a progressive decline in the standard of living over the past few years.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

progressive

I. progressive1 /prəˈɡresɪv/ BrE AmE adjective
[Word Family: noun: ↑progress, ↑progression, ↑progressive; verb: ↑progress; adverb: ↑progressively; adjective: ↑progressive]
1. supporting new or modern ideas and methods, especially in politics and education:
a progressive administration
progressive and forward-looking policies
2. happening or developing gradually over a period of time
progressive decline/reduction/increase etc
the progressive increase in population
Britain’s progressive decline as a world power
3. technical the progressive form of a verb is used to show that an action or activity is continuing to happen. In English, it consists of the verb ‘be’ followed by the ↑present participle, as in ‘I was waiting for the bus’. SYN continuous

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

progressive

pro·gres·sive [progressive progressives] adjective, noun   [prəˈɡresɪv]    [prəˈɡresɪv] 

adjective
1. in favour of new ideas, modern methods and change
• progressive schools

Opp:  retrogressive

2. happening or developing steadily
• a progressive reduction in the size of the workforce

• a progressive muscular disease

3. (also con·tinu·ous) (grammar) connected with the form of a verb (for example I am waiting or It is raining) that is made from a part of be and the present participle. Progressive forms are used to express an action that continues for a period of time. 
Word Origin:
early 17th cent.: from French progressif, -ive or medieval Latin progressivus, from progress- ‘gone forward’, from the verb progredi, from pro- ‘forward’ + gradi ‘to walk’.  
Example Bank:
highly progressive in outlook
Are you in favour of progressive teaching methods?
• He is progressive, open-minded, and sincerely concerned with civil-rights struggles.

Derived Word: progressivism 

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

progressive / prəˈɡres.ɪv / adjective (GRADUAL)

C1 developing or happening gradually:

There's been a progressive decline in the standard of living over the past few years.

a progressive disease   

 

progressive / prəˈɡres.ɪv / adjective (MODERN)

B2 describes ideas or systems that are new and modern, encouraging change in society or in the way that things are done:

progressive ideas/attitudes

The left of the party is pressing for a more progressive social policy.

 

a progressive school

progressive / prəˈɡres.ɪv / adjective (TAX)

describes a tax system in which the rate of tax is higher on larger amounts of money

 

progressive / prəˈɡres.ɪv / adjective (GRAMMAR)

describes the form of a verb that is used to show that the action is continuing. It is formed with the verb 'be' followed by the present participle (= -ing form of the verb) :

'He's working hard at the moment' is an example of the present progressive form of the verb 'work'.

'I was eating when the phone rang' is an example of the past progressive.

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

progressive

[prəgre̱sɪv]
 progressives
 1) ADJ-GRADED Someone who is progressive or has progressive ideas has modern ideas about how things should be done, rather than traditional ones.
  ...a progressive businessman who had voted for Roosevelt in 1932 and 1936...
  Willan was able to point to the progressive changes he had already introduced...
  The children go to a progressive school.
  Ant:
  conservative
 N-COUNT
 A progressive is someone who is progressive. The Republicans were deeply split between progressives and conservatives.
 2) ADJ: usu ADJ n A progressive change happens gradually over a period of time.
  One prominent symptom of the disease is progressive loss of memory.
  ...the progressive development of a common foreign and security policy.
  Syn:
  gradual
  Ant:
  sudden
  Derived words:
  progressively ADV ADV compar, ADV with v Her symptoms became progressively worse... The amount of grant the council received from the Government was progressively reduced.
 3) ADJ: ADJ n In grammar, progressive means the same as continuous.

 

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

1pro·gres·sive /prəˈgrɛsɪv/ adj
1 : moving forward
• the progressive movements of the hands of a clock
2 : happening or developing gradually over a period of time
• a progressive disease
3 [more ~; most ~] : using or interested in new or modern ideas especially in politics and education
• a progressive community/school
• a progressive candidate
4 grammar : of or relating to the progressive tense of a verb
• a progressive verb form

powerful

powerful [adjective] (CONTROL)

having a lot of power to control people and events

US /ˈpaʊ.ɚ.fəl/ 
UK /ˈpaʊə.fəl/ 

قدرتمند

مثال: 

The president is more powerful than the prime minister.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

powerful

 adjective

1 having a lot of strength or power:
The car has a very powerful engine.
The president is very powerful.

2 having a strong effect:
a powerful drug

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

powerful

powerful S3 W2 /ˈpaʊəfəl $ ˈpaʊr-/ BrE AmE adjective
[Word Family: noun: ↑power, ↑superpower, ↑powerlessness, ↑empowerment; adjective: ↑powerful ≠ ↑powerless, ↑overpowering, ↑power, ↑powered; verb: ↑power, ↑empower, ↑overpower; adverb: ↑powerfully ≠ ↑powerlessly, ↑overpoweringly]
1. IMPORTANT a powerful person, organization, group etc is able to control and influence events and other people’s actions ⇨ powerless:
He was one of the most powerful men in Bohemia.
a very influential and powerful family
rich and powerful nations
2. SPEECH/FILM ETC having a strong effect on someone’s feelings or opinions:
a powerful speech
powerful reasons/arguments (=reasons that make you think that something must be true)
Good teamwork is a powerful tool (=very effective method) for effective management.
3. FEELING/EFFECT a powerful feeling or effect is very strong or great:
Immigrants have had a powerful influence on the local culture.
a powerful sense of tradition
4. MACHINE/WEAPON ETC a powerful machine, engine, weapon etc is very effective and can do a lot:
a new generation of more powerful PCs
a machine that is immensely powerful
a powerful 24-valve engine
a powerful telescope
5. PHYSICALLY STRONG physically strong:
Jed was a powerful, well-built man.
The females are smaller and less powerful than the males.
6. A LOT OF FORCE a powerful blow, explosion etc has a lot of force:
an explosion ten times more powerful than the Hiroshima bomb
a powerful right-foot shot on goal
winds powerful enough to uproot trees
7. MEDICINE a powerful medicine or drug has a very strong effect on your body
8. TEAM/ARMY ETC a powerful team, army etc is very strong and can easily defeat other teams or armies:
a powerful fighting force
9. QUALITY very strong, bright, loud etc:
a powerful singing voice
the powerful headlights

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

powerful

power·ful   [ˈpaʊəfl]    [ˈpaʊərfl]  adjective
1. (of people) being able to control and influence people and events
Syn:  influential
an immensely powerful organization
one of the most powerful directors in Hollywood
• a rich and powerful man

• Only the intervention of powerful friends obtained her release.

2. having great power or force; very effective
powerful weapons
a powerful engine
a powerful voice
• a powerful telescope

• I traded my computer in for a more powerful model.

3. having a strong effect on your mind or body
a powerful image/drug/speech
Television may have a powerful influence on children.
• Fear is a powerful emotion.

• There is a powerful argument for changing the law.

4. (of a person or an animal) physically strong
Syn:  muscular
a powerful body
a powerful athlete
Derived Word: powerfully  
Thesaurus:
powerful [powerful powerfully] adj.
1.
She is one of the most powerful women in politics.
influentialimportantgreatdominanthigh-powered|approving strong
Opp: weak, Opp: powerless
a/an powerful/influential/important/great/dominant/strong figure/leader/position
a/an powerful/influential/important/dominant individual/group
a/an powerful/important/great/dominant/strong influence
Which word? Powerful people such as politicians use their position to control events. Influential people change other people's opinions or behaviour because people respect and listen to them. Important people influence other people or events because people respect them or because their position means their actions have a great effect. Strong people are confident and have leadership qualities.
2. (especially written, usually approving)
He was lithe and powerful as an athlete.
strongmuscular
Opp: weak
(a) powerful/strong/muscular build/body/arms/legs
powerful/strong muscles/jaws  
Example Bank:
a politically powerful figure
locally powerful landowners
He is one of the most powerful directors in Hollywood.
He was lithe and powerful as an athlete.
He was the most powerful man in the country after the king.
It is a country where religious leaders are often more powerful than politicians.
This extremist movement has become increasingly powerful in recent years.
• When she trots she covers ground like a powerful horse rather than a pony.

• Why are there still so few women in politically powerful positions?

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

powerful / ˈpaʊə.f ə l /   / ˈpaʊɚ- / adjective (CONTROL)

B1 having a lot of power to control people and events:

The president is more powerful than the prime minister.

She's the most powerful person in the organization.

 

powerfully / -i /   / ˈpaʊɚ- / adverb

B2

He argued powerfully and persuasively against capital punishment.

She kicked the ball so powerfully that it flew over the hedge.

Klaus is a very powerfully built man (= has a body with large strong muscles) .

 

powerful / ˈpaʊə.f ə l /   / ˈpaʊɚ- / adjective (STRENGTH)

B1 having a lot of strength or force:

She's an extremely powerful runner.

The picture quality is bad because the TV signal isn't powerful enough.

B2 having a very great effect:

a powerful drug

Her speech about cruelty to children was very powerful.

 

powerfully / -i /   / ˈpaʊɚ- / adverb

B2

He argued powerfully and persuasively against capital punishment.

She kicked the ball so powerfully that it flew over the hedge.

Klaus is a very powerfully built man (= has a body with large strong muscles) .

 

powerful / ˈpaʊə.f ə l /   / ˈpaʊɚ- / adjective (IMAGE SIZE)

having the power to increase the size of an image of something that is very small or far away many times:

You'd need an extremely powerful microscope to see something so small.

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

powerful

[pa͟ʊə(r)fʊl]
 ♦♦
 1) ADJ-GRADED A powerful person or organization is able to control or influence people and events.
 → See also all-powerful
  You're a powerful man - people will listen to you.
  ...Russia and India, two large, powerful countries.
  ...Hong Kong's powerful business community.
  Syn:
  influential
  Ant:
  powerless
 2) ADJ-GRADED You say that someone's body is powerful when it is physically strong.
  Hans flexed his powerful muscles...
  It's such a big powerful dog.
  Syn:
  strong
  Ant:
  weak
  Derived words:
  powerfully ADV-GRADED ADV with v He is described as a strong, powerfully-built man of 60... You can contract your muscles more powerfully by linking up your breathing to the exercise.
 3) ADJ-GRADED: usu ADJ n A powerful machine or substance is effective because it is very strong.
  The more powerful the car the more difficult it is to handle.
  ...powerful computer systems...
  Alcohol is also a powerful and fast-acting drug.
  Derived words:
  powerfully ADV ADV adj Crack is a much cheaper, smokable form of cocaine which is powerfully addictive.
 4) ADJ-GRADED: usu ADJ n A powerful smell is very strong.
  There was a powerful smell of stale beer.
  ...tiny creamy flowers with a powerful scent.
  Syn:
  strong
  Derived words:
  powerfully ADV-GRADED ADV after v The railway station smelt powerfully of cats and drains.
 5) ADJ-GRADED A powerful voice is loud and can be heard from a long way away.
  At that moment Mrs. Jones's powerful voice interrupted them, announcing a visitor.
  Syn:
  loud
 6) ADJ-GRADED You describe a piece of writing, speech, or work of art as powerful when it has a strong effect on people's feelings or beliefs.
  ...Bleasdale's powerful 11-part drama about a corrupt city leader.
  ...one of the world's most powerful and moving operas, Verdi's `Otello'.
  ...a powerful new style of dance-theatre.
  Derived words:
  powerfully ADV-GRADED ADV -ed, ADV after v It's a play - painful, funny and powerfully acted.

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

powerful

pow·er·ful /ˈpawɚfəl/ adj [more ~; most ~]
1 : having the ability to control or influence people or things
• rich and powerful people
• a powerful ally
• The country is becoming more and more powerful.
2 : having a strong effect on someone or something
powerful drugs that attack cancer cells
• The cash bonus provides a powerful incentive to workers.
powerful emotions/images
• The perfume has a powerful smell.
• It's a very powerful movie.
• He gave a powerful [=moving] speech.
• a powerful [=convincing, compelling] argument
3 : having or producing a lot of physical strength or force
powerful magnets
• a powerful machine/motor/force
• The dog has a powerful body.
• She has a powerful voice.
• The weapons are very powerful.
• The aardvark uses its powerful claws to dig for food.
4 : capable of doing many things in a fast and efficient way
• His new computer is more powerful than the one I have.
the powerful : powerful people
• the weak and the powerful
- pow·er·ful·ly adv
• a powerfully built man [=a man with a body that looks very strong]
• a powerfully written speech/book

deserve

deserve [verb]

to have earned or to be given something because of the way you have behaved or the qualities you have

US /dɪˈzɝːv/ 
UK /dɪˈzɜːv/ 

سزاوار بودن‌

مثال: 

After all that hard work, you deserve a holiday.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

deserve

 verb (deserves, deserving, deserved )
to be good or bad enough to have something:
You have worked very hard and you deserve a rest.
They stole money from old people, so they deserve to go to prison.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

deserve

deserve S3 W3 /dɪˈzɜːv $ -ɜːrv/ BrE AmE verb [transitive]
[Date: 1200-1300; Language: Old French; Origin: Latin deservire 'to serve very keenly', from servire 'to serve']
1. to have earned something by good or bad actions or behaviour:
What have I done to deserve this?
deserve to do something
We didn’t deserve to win.
richly/fully/thoroughly etc deserve something
the success he so richly deserves
I’m sorry for the kids. They deserve better (=deserve to be treated in a better way).
deserve a rest/break/holiday etc
I think we deserve a rest after all that hard work.
Ledley deserves a place in the team.
Paula deserves a special mention for all the help she has given us.
I would never hit anyone, even if they deserved it.
What has he done to deserve this punishment?
deserve all/everything you get (=deserve any bad things that happen to you)
He deserves all he gets for being so dishonest.
People who are sent to prison for drunk-driving get what they deserve.
2. deserve consideration/attention etc if a suggestion, idea, or plan deserves consideration, attention etc, it is good enough to be considered, paid attention to etc SYN merit:
This proposal deserves serious consideration.
3. somebody deserves a medal spoken used to say that you admire the way someone dealt with a situation or problem
somebody deserves a medal for
You deserve a medal for putting up with Ian’s constant demands.
• • •
COLLOCATIONS
■ nouns
deserve a rest/break/holiday etc Once the students have done their exams they deserve a break.
deserve a chance Everybody deserves a second chance.
deserve respect Our police officers deserve our respect.
deserve credit/praise The team played really well and they deserve credit for it.
deserve support This is a splendid proposal which deserves our support.
deserve recognition (=public respect and thanks) The teaching profession deserves more recognition.
deserve better (also deserve a better deal) (=deserve to be treated better or to be in a better situation) They treated him badly at work and I thought he deserved better.
deserve a (special) mention (=used especially in speeches to mention someone's good work or actions) Richard deserves a special mention for all his hard work on this project.
deserve a place You need top grades to deserve a place at the best universities.
deserve punishment If you commit a crime, you have deserved punishment.
■ adverbs
thoroughly/fully deserve something He didn't work so he thoroughly deserved his poor marks.
richly deserve something (=greatly deserve something good that happens) Her success was richly deserved.
well deserved The restaurant has a well deserved reputation for excellent fish.
■ phrases
get what you deserve (=experience something bad after you have behaved badly) I like films where the bad guys get what they deserve.
deserve all/everything you get (=deserve any bad things that happen to you) She's behaved really stupidly and she deserves all she gets.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

deserve

de·serve [deserve deserves deserved deserving]   [dɪˈzɜːv]    [dɪˈzɜːrv]  verb
(not used in the progressive tenses) if sb/sth deserves sth, it is right that they should have it, because of the way they have behaved or because of what they are
~ sth You deserve a rest after all that hard work.
The report deserves careful consideration.
One player in particular deserves a mention.
What have I done to deserve this?
~ to do sth They didn't deserve to win.
He deserves to be locked up for ever for what he did.
~ doing sth Several other points deserve mentioning.
more at one good turn deserves another at  turn  n.
Idioms: deserve all you get  get what you deserve  somebody deserves a medal
Verb forms:

 
Word Origin:
Middle English: from Old French deservir, from Latin deservire ‘serve well or zealously’.  
Thesaurus:
deserve verb T
You deserve a rest after all that work.
earn|formal merit
deserve/earn a rest/drink
deserve/merit a mention
deserve/merit attention/consideration/recognition
Deserve or earn? Deserve can be used to talk about either sth pleasant sb should have for doing good, or a punishment for sth bad; earn is only used to talk about sth good.  
Example Bank:
He finally received the recognition that he so richly deserved.
His work received only a tiny mention in the journal; he deserves better.
It's true she made a mistake but she hardly deserves to lose her job.
Philip's efforts clearly deserve praise.
She deserves some reward for all her hard work.
This hotel fully deserves its four-star grading.
• You really deserve a medal!

• They didn't deserve to win.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

deserve / dɪˈzɜːv /   / -ˈzɝːv / verb [ T not continuous ]

B1 to have earned or to be given something because of the way you have behaved or the qualities you have:

After all that hard work, you deserve a holiday.

Chris deserves our special thanks for all his efforts.

I hope they get the punishment they deserve.

[ + to infinitive ] They certainly deserved to win that match.

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

deserve

[dɪzɜ͟ː(r)v]
 deserves, deserving, deserved
 1) VERB If you say that a person or thing deserves something, you mean that they should have it or receive it because of their actions or qualities.
  [V n] Government officials clearly deserve some of the blame as well...
  [V n] They know the sport inside out, and we treat them with the respect they deserve...
  [V to-inf] These people deserve to make more than the minimum wage...
  [V to-inf] His children's books are classics that deserve to be much better known...
  [V compar] By the time I left he'd become pretty hostile. I felt I deserved better than that...
  [V-ed] The Park Hotel has been in business since 1834 and has a well-deserved reputation.
 2) PHRASE (feelings) If you say that someone got what they deserved, you mean that they deserved the bad thing that happened to them, and you have no sympathy for them.
  One of them said the two dead joy riders got what they deserved.

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

deserve

de·serve /dɪˈzɚv/ verb -serves; -served; -serv·ing [+ obj]
- used to say that someone or something should or should not have or be given something
• She deserves another chance.
• He doesn't deserve the award.
• Every defendant deserves a fair trial.
• The newspaper deserves a lot of credit for calling attention to the problem.
• I think the idea deserves [=merits] consideration.
• The story deserves telling. [=the story should be told; the story is important enough to tell]
• What did I do to deserve this kind of harsh treatment? [=you should not treat me this way]
• She believes that people eventually get what they deserve.
• He deserves a medal for coming up with a solution so quickly. [=he did something very good and impressive by coming up with a solution so quickly]
- often followed by to + verb
• Anyone who will not use a map deserves to get lost.
• They deserve to be punished.
• He deserves to win.
- deserved /dɪˈzɚvd/ adj
• a well-deserved vacation/break
• a deserved win/victory/reputation
• The award/criticism was not deserved.
- de·serv·ed·ly /dɪˈzɚvədli/ adv
• She was deservedly praised for her generosity.
• He has been accused of being selfish, and deservedly so. [=he deserves to be called selfish; it is reasonable to call him selfish because of his behavior]

fool

fool [noun] (PERSON)

a person who behaves in a silly way without thinking

US /fuːl/ 
UK /fuːl/ 

احمق

مثال: 

He's a fool if he thinks she still loves him.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

 noun
a person who is silly or who does something silly:
You fool! You forgot to lock the door!

make a fool of yourself to do something that makes you look silly in front of other people:
He always makes a fool of himself at parties.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

I. fool1 /fuːl/ BrE AmE noun
[Date: 1200-1300; Language: Old French; Origin: fol, from Latin follis 'bag for blowing air']
1. STUPID PERSON [countable] a stupid person or someone who has done something stupid SYN idiot:
What a fool she had been to think that he would stay.
Like a fool, I accepted straight away.
You silly old fool!
2. make a fool of yourself to do something stupid that you feel embarrassed about afterwards and that makes you seem silly:
Sorry I made such a fool of myself last night. I must have been drunk.
3. make a fool of somebody to deliberately do something to make someone else seem stupid:
I suddenly realised that I was being made a fool of.
4. any fool can do something spoken used to say that it is very easy to do something or to see that something is true:
Any fool could have seen what would happen.
5. be no/nobody’s fool to be difficult to trick or deceive, because you have a lot of experience and knowledge about something:
Katherine was nobody’s fool when it came to money.
6. gooseberry/strawberry etc fool British English a sweet food made of soft cooked fruit mixed with cream
7. more fool you/him etc British English spoken used to say that you think someone was stupid to do something, and it is their own fault if this causes trouble:
‘Jim smashed up my car.’ ‘More fool you for letting him borrow it!’
8. not suffer fools gladly if you say that someone doesn’t suffer fools gladly, they do not have any patience with people who they think are stupid
9. be living in a fool’s paradise to feel happy and satisfied, and believe there are no problems, when in fact this is not true
10. play/act the fool to behave in a silly way, especially in order to make people laugh:
Stop playing the fool! You’ll fall.
11. (send somebody on) a fool’s errand to make someone go somewhere or do something for no good reason
12. fools rush in (where angels fear to tread) used to say that people are stupid if they do something immediately without thinking about it first
13. a fool and his money are soon parted used to say that stupid people spend money quickly without thinking about it
14. ENTERTAINER [countable] a man whose job was to entertain a king or other powerful people in the past, by doing tricks, singing funny songs etc SYN jester
⇨ ↑April fool

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

fool [fool fools fooled fooling] noun, verb, adjective   [fuːl]    [fuːl] 

noun
1. countable a person who you think behaves or speaks in a way that lacks intelligence or good judgement
Syn:  idiot
Don't be such a fool!
I felt a fool when I realized my mistake.

• He told me he was an actor and I was fool enough to believe him.

2. countable (in the past) a man employed by a king or queen to entertain people by telling jokes, singing songs, etc.

Syn:  jester

3. uncountable, countable (BrE) (usually in compounds) a cold light dessert (= a sweet dish) made from fruit that is cooked and crushed and mixed with cream or custard
rhubarb fool
more at not suffer fools gladly at  suffer  
Word Origin:
n. senses 1 to 2 and v. adj. Middle English Old French fol ‘fool, foolish’ Latin follis ‘bellows, windbag’ ‘empty-headed person’
n. sense 3 late 16th cent. fool  ‘foolish’
 
Thesaurus:
fool noun C (sometimes offensive)
Don't be such a fool!
sometimes offensive idiot|BrE, informal, sometimes offensive prat|especially AmE, informal, sometimes offensive dork|offensive moron|especially AmE, informal, offensive jerk
a complete fool/idiot/prat/dork/moron/jerk
feel/look like a/an fool/idiot/prat/dork/moron/jerk
make a fool/idiot/prat/dork of yourself  
Synonyms:
cheat
fool deceive betray take in trick con
These words all mean to make sb believe sth that is not true, especially in order to get what you want.
cheatto make sb believe sth that is not true, in order to get money or sth else from them: She is accused of attempting to cheat the taxman. He cheated his way into the job.
Cheat also means to act in a dishonest way in order to gain an advantage, especially in a game, competition or exam: You're not allowed to look at the answers— that's cheating .
foolto make sb believe sth that is not true, especially in order to laugh at them or to get what you want: Just don't be fooled into investing any money with them.
deceiveto make sb believe sth that is not true, especially sb who trusts you, in order to get what you want: She deceived him into handing over all his savings.
betrayto hurt sb who trusts you, especially by deceiving them or not being loyal to them: She felt betrayed when she found out the truth about him.
take sb in[often passive] to deceive sb, usually in order to get what you want: I was taken in by her story.
trickto deceive sb, especially in a clever way, in order to get what you want.
con(informal) to deceive sb, especially in order to get money from them or get them to do sth for you: They had been conned out of £100 000.
which word?
Many of these words involve making sb believe sth that is not true, but some of them are more disapproving than others. Deceive is probably the worst because people typically deceive friends, relations and others who know and trust them. People may feel cheated/betrayed by sb in authority who they trusted to look after their interests. If sb takes you in, they may do it by acting a part and using words and charm effectively. If sb cheats/fools/tricks/cons you, they may get sth from you and make you feel stupid. However, sb might fool you just as a joke; and to trick sb is sometimes seen as a clever thing to do, if the person being tricked is seen as a bad person who deserves it.
to cheat/fool/trick/con sb out of sth
to cheat/fool/deceive/betray/trick/con sb into doing sth
to feel cheated/fooled/deceived/betrayed/tricked/conned
to fool/deceive yourself
to cheat/trick/con your way into sth 
Example Bank:
He thought that being an actor only involved tap dancing and playing the fool.
I felt like a fool when I realized what I'd done.
I thought it was safe to leave my suitcase there. More fool me.
Like a fool, I told her everything.
She doesn't suffer fools gladly.
She was angry at having been made a fool of.
She's nobody's fool. She had the car checked by a mechanic before buying it.
Stop acting the fool and be serious!
Stop behaving like a fool!
That fool of a doctor has prescribed me the wrong medicine!
The poor old fool was imprisoned on my account.
They had left me looking like a fool.
You silly little fool!
You're an even bigger fool than I thought.
court fools who used to provide entertainment in the royal court
Don't be such a fool!
I made a complete fool of myself in front of everyone.
You must take me for a fool!
Idioms: act the fool  any fool can  fool and his money are soon parted  fools rush in  make a fool of somebody  make a fool of yourself  more fool somebody  no fool  no fool like an old fool  you could have fooled me

Derived: fool around 

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

fool / fuːl / noun (PERSON)

B1 [ C ] a person who behaves in a silly way without thinking:

[ as form of address ] You fool, you've missed your chance!

He's a fool if he thinks she still loves him.

[ + to infinitive ] He's a fool to think she still loves him.

He's fool enough to think she still loves him.

My fool of a (= silly) husband has gone out and taken my keys!

[ C ] in the past, a person who was employed in the court of a king or queen to make them laugh by telling jokes and doing funny things act/play the fool to behave in a silly way, often intentionally to make people laugh:

Stop acting the fool, I'm trying to talk to you.

any fool anyone:

Any fool could tell that she was joking.

make a fool of sb

B2 to trick someone or make them appear stupid in some way

make a fool of yourself B2 to do something that makes other people think you are silly or not to be respected:

I got a bit drunk and made a fool of myself.

more fool sb mainly UK said to mean that you think someone is being unwise:

"I lent Rhoda $100 and she hasn't paid me back." "More fool you - you know what she's like!"

be no fool ( also be nobody's fool ) to not be stupid or easily deceived:

I notice Ed didn't offer to pay for her - he's no fool.

fool / fuːl / noun [ C or U ] (SWEET DISH)

a sweet, soft food made of crushed fruit, cream, and sugar:

gooseberry fool

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

fool

[fu͟ːl]
 
 fools, fooling, fooled
 1) N-COUNT (disapproval) If you call someone a fool, you are indicating that you think they are not at all sensible and show a lack of good judgement.
  `You fool!' she shouted...
  He'd been a fool to get involved with her!
  Syn:
  idiot
 2) ADJ: ADJ n (disapproval) Fool is used to describe an action or person that is not at all sensible and shows a lack of good judgement. [mainly AM, INFORMAL]
  What a damn fool thing to do!...
  What can that fool guard be thinking of?
 3) VERB If someone fools you, they deceive or trick you.
  [V n] Art dealers fool a lot of people...
  [V n] Don't be fooled by his appearance...
  [V n into -ing] They tried to fool you into coming after us.
  Syn:
  trick, con
 4) VERB If you say that a person is fooling with something or someone, you mean that the way they are behaving is likely to cause problems.
  [V with n] What are you doing fooling with such a staggering sum of money?...
  [V with n] He kept telling her that here you did not fool with officials.
 5) N-COUNT: usu the N In the courts of kings and queens in medieval Europe, the fool was the person whose job was to do silly things in order to make people laugh.
  Syn:
  jester
 6) N-VAR Fool is a dessert made by mixing soft cooked fruit with whipped cream or with custard. [BRIT]
  ...gooseberry fool.
 7) PHRASE: V and N inflect If you make a fool of someone, you make them seem silly by telling people about something stupid that they have done, or by tricking them.
  Your brother is making a fool of you...
  He'd been made a fool of.
 8) PHRASE: V and N inflect If you make a fool of yourself, you behave in a way that makes other people think that you are silly or lacking in good judgement.
  He was drinking and making a fool of himself.
 9) PHRASE (disapproval) If you say to someone `More fool you' when they tell you what they have done or what they plan to do, you are indicating that you think that it is silly and shows a lack of judgement. [BRIT]
  Most managers couldn't care less about information technology. More fool them.
 10) PHRASE: V inflects If you play the fool or act the fool, you behave in a playful, childish, and foolish way, usually in order to make other people laugh.
  They used to play the fool together, calling each other silly names and giggling.
  Syn:
  mess about
 11) to suffer fools gladlysee suffer
  Phrasal Verbs:
  - fool about
  - fool around

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

1fool /ˈfuːl/ noun, pl fools [count]
1 : a person who lacks good sense or judgment : a stupid or silly person
• those fools who ride motorcycles without wearing helmets
• Only a fool would ask such a silly question.
• You'd be a fool to believe what he tells you.
• You're making yourself look like a fool.
A fool and his money are soon parted. [=a foolish person spends money too quickly on unimportant things]
Any fool can see [=anyone can see] that he's lying.
• I never thought you'd be fool enough to believe him. = I never thought you'd be enough of a fool to believe him.
• (informal) Only that fool of a brother [=that foolish brother] of yours would ask such a silly question!
• (informal) Some (damn/damned) fool of a driver kept trying to pass me!
Fools rush in (where angels fear to tread). [=it is foolish to take action if you do not know much about what you are doing]
• (Brit, informal) (The) more fool you if you believe him. = (The) more fool you for believing him. [=you would be a fool to believe him]
• (Brit, informal) More fool him for trusting her.
There's no fool like an old fool. [=a foolish old person is especially foolish because an old person should have learned from experience not to make the kind of mistakes a young person makes]
✦A smart or clever person can be described as no fool or as nobody's fool.
• He may not look very smart, but he's no fool.
• Don't try to trick her—she's nobody's fool.
2 US informal : a person who enjoys something very much
• He's a dancing fool. [=he loves to dance]
• He's a fool for candy. [=he loves to eat candy]
3 chiefly Brit : a dessert made with cooked fruit and cream or a thick sauce
• a strawberry fool
4 : jester
act/play the fool : to behave in a silly or foolish way
• If you keep playing the fool by asking silly questions, people won't take you seriously.
make a fool of yourself : to behave in a very foolish or silly way
• He got drunk at the party and made a fool of himself.
• He's making a fool of himself over that woman.
make a fool (out) of : to cause (someone) to look stupid or foolish
• She made a fool of me by insulting me in front of my friends.

- see also april fools' day

wise

wise [adjective]

approving having or showing the ability to make good judgments, based on a deep understanding and experience of life

US /waɪz/ 
UK /waɪz/ 

عاقل

مثال: 

I think you made a wise choice.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

wise

 adjective (wiser, wisest)
knowing and understanding a lot about many things:
a wise old man
Do you think this is wise?

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

wise

I. wise1 S3 /waɪz/ BrE AmE adjective
[Language: Old English; Origin: wis]
1. DECISION/IDEA ETC wise decisions and actions are sensible and based on good judgment SYN sensible
it is wise to do something
It’s wise to check whether the flight times have changed before you leave for the airport.
be wise to do something
I think you were wise to leave when you did.
a wise precaution
I don’t think that would be a very wise move (=not be a sensible thing to do).
2. PERSON someone who is wise makes good decisions, gives good advice etc, especially because they have a lot of experience of life:
a wise old man
At the time I thought he was wonderful, but I’m older and wiser now.
As a manager, Sanford was wise in the ways of (=knew a lot about) company politics.
3. be none the wiser/not be any the wiser
a) to not understand something even after it has been explained to you:
Charlie explained how the system works, but I’m still none the wiser.
b) used for saying that no one will find out about something bad that someone has done:
He could easily have taken the money and no one would have been any the wiser.
4. get/be wise to somebody/something informal to realize that someone is being dishonest:
Teachers quickly get wise to students who are cheating. ⇨ wise up at ↑wise2
5. wise guy especially informal American English an annoying person who thinks they know more than they really do:
OK, wise guy, shut up and listen!
6. be wise after the event to realize what you should have done in a situation after it has happened:
It’s easy to be wise after the event.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

wise

wise [wise wises wised wising wiser wisest] adjective, verb   [waɪz]    [waɪz] 

adjective (wiser, wis·est)
1. (of people) able to make sensible decisions and give good advice because of the experience and knowledge that you have
• a wise old man

• I'm older and wiser after ten years in the business.

2. (of actions and behaviour) sensible; based on good judgement
Syn:  prudent
a wise decision
It was very wise to leave when you did.
The wisest course of action is just to say nothing.
I was grateful for her wise counsel.  
Word Origin:
Old English wīs, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch wijs and German weise.  
Example Bank:
It was not considered wise to move her to another hospital.
He was known to be a wise and gentle ruler.
He was too wise and experienced to try to escape.
I'm older and wiser after ten years in the business.
It was very wise of you to leave when you did.
Locking your car doors is always a wise precaution.
Idioms: none the wiser  not be any the wiser  put somebody wise  wise after the event  wise to somebody
Derived Word: wisely

Derived: wise up 

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

wise / waɪz / adjective

B2 approving having or showing the ability to make good judgments, based on a deep understanding and experience of life:

I think you made a wise choice.

"I never drink more than three glasses of wine." "How wise."

Looking at the weather, I think we made a wise decision not to go to the coast this weekend.

I think it would be wiser to wait and see how much money you've got left before you make any decisions.

I never used to save money but now I'm a little older and wiser I can see the sense in it.

Was it Thomas More who said that the wise man learns from the experience of others?

wise to sth informal understanding a dishonest situation or way of doing something:

I used to be scrupulously honest then I got wise to the system.

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

wise

[wa͟ɪz]
 ♦♦♦
 wises, wising, wised, wiser, wisest

 1) ADJ-GRADED A wise person is able to use their experience and knowledge in order to make sensible decisions and judgements.
  She has the air of a wise woman...
  You're a wise old man: tell me what to do.
  Ant:
  foolish
  Derived words:
  wisely ADV-GRADED ADV with v The three of us stood around the machine nodding wisely.
 2) ADJ-GRADED: oft it v-link ADJ to-inf A wise action or decision is sensible.
  It's never wise to withhold evidence...
  She had made a very wise decision...
  It is wise to seek help and counsel as soon as possible.
  Syn:
  sensible
  Derived words:
  wisely ADV-GRADED usu ADV with v They've invested their money wisely... Our man had wisely decided to be picked up at the farm.
 3) PHRASE: PHR to-inf If someone says to you that it would be wise to do something, they are advising you to do it, because it is the most sensible and reasonable action or decision in a particular situation.
  It would be wise to get his eyes checked to ensure there is no problem.
 4) PHRASE: V inflects, PHR n If you get wise to something, you find out about it, especially when someone has been trying to keep it secret. [INFORMAL]
  Dealers have already got wise to the trend and increased their prices accordingly.
  Syn:
  wise up to
 5) PHRASE: v-link PHR If you say that someone is none the wiser after an event or an explanation, or that nobody is any the wiser after it, you mean that they have failed to understand it, or are not fully aware of what happened.
  The brewers are still none the wiser about the shape the Government envisages for the industry...
  We could have stolen the original from the warehouse without you being any the wiser.
  Phrasal Verbs:
  - wise up

 

[-waɪz]
 1) COMB in ADV: ADV with cl -wise is added to nouns to form adverbs indicating that something is the case when considering the particular thing mentioned.
  Career-wise, this illness couldn't have come at a worse time...
  It was a much better day weather-wise...
  Because the work was voluntary it was flexible, time-wise.
 2) COMB in ADV: ADV after v -wise is added to nouns to form adverbs indicating that someone behaves in the same way as the person or thing that is mentioned.
  We were housed student-wise in dormitory rooms...
  Kenny, struggling with too many chairs, moved crabwise towards the door.
  Syn:
  -like

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

1wise /ˈwaɪz/ adj wis·er; -est
1 : having or showing wisdom or knowledge usually from learning or experiencing many things
• a wise old woman
• a wise saying
• I'm a little wiser now than I was back then.
- see also penny-wise, streetwise
2 : based on good reasoning or information : showing good sense or judgment
• The wisest course of action would be to leave.
• It was wise of you to ask permission first. = You were wise to ask permission first.
• That was a wise choice.
• Many have benefited from her wise counsel/advice.
3 US informal : saying things that are rude or insulting
• Don't you get wise [=smart, fresh] with me, young man!
a word to the wise
- see 1word
crack wise
- see 1crack
none the wiser or not any the wiser
1 : not knowing or understanding anything more about something
• The investigation has been going on for months, and we're still none the wiser about the true cause of the accident. [=we still don't know anything more about the true cause]
2 also never the wiser
- used to describe someone who is not at all aware of something that has happened
• I borrowed his car and returned it, and he was none the wiser. [=he did not know that I had borrowed his car]
• We left early, and no one was any the wiser. [=no one noticed that we had left]
wise in the ways of : having knowledge about or experience with (someone or something)
• Don't worry. They're wise in the ways of finances.
• She is wise in the ways of the world.
wise to informal : not fooled by (someone or something)
• I'm wise to you. = I'm wise to what you're doing. [=I know what you're doing; I know that you are trying to do something dishonest] : aware of (something, especially something dishonest)
• When she got wise to [=became aware of] his scheme, she left.
• He told me I'd better get wise to what was happening.
• (chiefly US) Let me put/make you wise to [=tell you about] their plans.
- wise·ly adv [more ~; most ~]
• The witness wisely refused to answer the question.
• If you invest wisely, you can make a lot of money.
• Try to choose your words more wisely.

father-in-law

father-in-law [noun]

the father of your husband or wife

US /ˈfɑː.ðɚ.ɪn.lɑː/ 
UK /ˈfɑː.ðər.ɪn.lɔː/ 

پدرزن، پدرشوهر

Oxford Essential Dictionary

father-in-law

 noun (plural fathers-in-law)
the father of your husband or wife

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

father-in-law

ˈfather-in-ˌlaw BrE AmE noun (plural fathers-in-law) [countable]
the father of your husband or wife

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

father-in-law

ˈfather-in-law [father-in-law fathers-in-law]       noun (pl. fathers-in-law)

the father of your husband or wife

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

ˈ father-in-law / ˈfɑː.ðə r .ɪn.lɔː /   / -ðɚ.ɪn.lɑː / noun [ C ] ( plural ^fathers-in-law )

B2 the father of your husband or wife

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

father-in-law

 fathers-in-law
 N-COUNT: usu poss N
 Someone's father-in-law is the father of their husband or wife.

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

father-in-law

fa·ther–in–law /ˈfɑːðɚənˌlɑː/ noun, pl fa·thers–in–law /ˈfɑːðɚzənˌlɑː/ [count] : the father of your husband or wife

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