American English

lucky

lucky [adjective]

having good things happen to you by chance

US /ˈlʌk.i/ 
UK /ˈlʌk.i/ 

نيك‌ بخت‌، خوش‌ شانس‌

مثال: 

"I'm going on holiday." "Lucky you!"

Oxford Essential Dictionary

lucky

 adjective (luckier, luckiest)

1 having good luck:
She is lucky to be alive after the accident.
 opposite unlucky

2 bringing success or good luck:
My lucky number is 3.
 opposite unlucky

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

lucky

lucky S2 W3 /ˈlʌki/ BrE AmE adjective (comparative luckier, superlative luckiest)
[Word Family: adjective: ↑lucky ≠ ↑unlucky, ↑luckless; noun: ↑luck; adverb: ↑luckily ≠ ↑unluckily]
1. having good luck SYN fortunate OPP unlucky
be lucky to do/be something
The children were lucky to survive the fire which destroyed their home.
lucky enough to do something
those of us lucky enough to own our own homes
lucky if
I’ll be lucky if I get any of my money back.
lucky (that)
I was tremendously lucky that I didn’t die in the accident.
lucky with
We’ve been very lucky with the weather.
count/consider/think yourself lucky
Count yourself lucky you’ve got a husband like Jack.
get lucky (=be lucky on a particular occasion)
You might get lucky and find a bargain.
2. resulting from good luck:
I didn’t really know your name – it was just a lucky guess.
A middle-aged woman had a lucky escape when a tree crashed down onto her car.
it is lucky (that)
It’s lucky that no-one was hurt.
3. bringing good luck:
a lucky charm
4. lucky you/me etc spoken used to say that someone is fortunate to be able to do something:
‘My husband’s a rich man, and devoted to me.’ ‘Lucky you.’
5. be sb’s lucky day spoken used to say that something good and often unexpected will happen to someone:
We’re going to win. I just know it’s our lucky day
6. you’ll/you’d be lucky! spoken used to tell someone that what they want probably will not happen:
‘£50 should be enough.’ ‘You’ll be lucky!’
7. I/you should be so lucky! spoken used to tell someone that what they want is not likely to happen, especially because it is unreasonable:
You want three weeks holiday? You should be so lucky!
strike it lucky at ↑strike1(19), ⇨ thank your lucky stars at ↑thank(3), ⇨ third time lucky at ↑third1(2)
• • •
COLLOCATIONS
■ verbs
feel lucky I feel so incredibly lucky to have had that experience.
get lucky informal (=be lucky) They’re not a great team - they just got lucky.
count/consider/think yourself lucky (=believe that you are lucky in a particular situation) You should count yourself lucky you weren’t seriously hurt.
strike (it) lucky informal (=be lucky) I applied for twenty jobs before I struck lucky.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

lucky

lucky [lucky luckier luckiest]   [ˈlʌki]    [ˈlʌki]  adjective (luck·ier, lucki·est)
1. having good luck
Syn:  fortunate
~ (to do sth) His friend was killed and he knows he is lucky to be alive.
She was lucky enough to be chosen for the team.
~ (that…) You were lucky (that) you spotted the danger in time.
You can think yourself lucky you didn't get mugged.
She counted herself lucky that she still had a job.
Mark is one of the lucky ones — he at least has somewhere to sleep.

• the lucky winners

2. ~ (for sb) (that…) being the result of good luck
It was lucky for us that we were able to go.
• That was the luckiest escape of my life.

• a lucky guess

3. bringing good luck
a lucky charm
more at strike (it) lucky at  strike  v., thank your lucky stars at  thank, third time lucky at  third
Idioms: lucky you/me  you should be so lucky  you'll be lucky
Derived Word: luckily  
Thesaurus:
lucky adj.
1.
Sam knew he was lucky to be alive.
fortunatein luck
Opp: unlucky
lucky/fortunate that…
lucky/fortunate to do sth
feel/consider yourself/count yourself/think yourself lucky/fortunate
2.
It was lucky for us that he didn't see us.
fortunatehappytimely
Opp: unlucky
lucky/fortunate/timely for sb/sth
lucky/fortunate/timely that…
a lucky/fortunate/happy coincidence/chance  
Example Bank:
It was lucky for you that no one saw you.
She hopes that some day she'll get lucky and win the jackpot.
She is incredibly lucky to be alive.
That was just plain lucky.
We certainly struck it lucky with the weather.
We've been pretty lucky so far.
A lucky find on the edge of the Cotswolds is helping archaeologists discover what life was like in Roman Britain.
• I didn't know he was there— it was just a lucky guess.

• It was lucky for us that he didn't see us.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

lucky / ˈlʌk.i / adjective

A2 having good things happen to you by chance:

"I'm going on holiday." "Lucky you!"

The lucky winner will be able to choose from three different holidays.

[ + to infinitive ] They're lucky to have such a nice office to work in.

He's lucky that he wasn't fired.

It sounds as if you had a lucky escape (= by good chance you were able to avoid something dangerous or unpleasant) .

We'll be lucky if we get there by midnight at this rate (= we might get there by midnight or it might be later) .

B1 bringing good luck:

a lucky charm

Six is my lucky number.

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

lucky

[lʌ̱ki]
 luckier, luckiest
 1) ADJ-GRADED: oft ADJ to-inf You say that someone is lucky when they have something that is very desirable or when they are in a very desirable situation.
  I am luckier than most. I have a job...
  I consider myself the luckiest man on the face of the Earth...
  He is incredibly lucky to be alive...
  Those who are lucky enough to be wealthy have a duty to give to the hungry.
  Syn:
  fortunate
 2) ADJ-GRADED Someone who is lucky seems to always have good luck.
  Some people are born lucky aren't they?...
  He had always been lucky at cards.
 3) ADJ-GRADED If you describe an action or experience as lucky, you mean that it was good or successful, and that it happened by chance and not as a result of planning or preparation.
  They admit they are now desperate for a lucky break...
  He was lucky that it was only a can of beer that knocked him on the head.
 4) ADJ: usu ADJ n A lucky object is something that people believe helps them to be successful.
  He did not have on his other lucky charm, a pair of green socks.
 5) → See also happy-go-lucky
 6) PHRASE: V inflects, usu PHR if, PHR to-inf If you say that someone will be lucky to do or get something, you mean that they are very unlikely to do or get it, and will definitely not do or get any more than that.
  You'll be lucky if you get any breakfast...
  Those remaining in work will be lucky to get the smallest of pay increases...
  You'll be lucky to have change out of ₤750.
 7) PHRASE: V inflects, oft PHR to-inf/that If you say that someone can count themselves lucky, you mean that the situation they are in or the thing that has happened to them is better than it might have been or than they might have expected.
  She counted herself lucky to get a job in one of Edinburgh's department stores...
  At the end of two days, you may count yourself lucky that you don't have to live here.
 8) CONVENTION You can use lucky in expressions such as `Lucky you' and `Lucky devil' when you are slightly jealous of someone else's good luck or success, or surprised at it. [INFORMAL]
  `The thing about Mr Kemp is that he always treats me like a lady.' - `Lucky old you.'
 9) PHRASE: V inflects If you strike lucky or strike it lucky, you have some good luck. [mainly BRIT, INFORMAL]
  You may strike lucky and find a sympathetic and helpful clerk, but, there again, you might not.
 10) PHRASE: usu v-link PHR If you say that it is third time lucky for someone, you mean that they have tried to do a particular thing twice before and that this time they will succeed.
  I've had two runners-up medals with Monaco and AC Milan, but I hope it will be third time lucky and I get a winners' medal with Rangers.
 11) to thank one's lucky starssee star

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

lucky

lucky /ˈlʌki/ adj luck·i·er; -est
1 : having good luck : fortunate
• We're lucky that things turned out as well as they did.
• You're lucky to have a choice. = You're lucky that you have a choice.
• I feel lucky to be alive.
• I count/consider myself lucky to know you.
• Aren't you the lucky one! [=you are a lucky person]
• “I managed to get a ticket!” “Lucky you! They were all sold out by the time I got there.”
• Tickets were available only for the lucky few.
• The lucky winner will be given a brand new car.
• I know you'll enjoy the show if you're lucky enough to get a ticket.
• Congratulations on getting the job, you lucky dog/devil.
• (chiefly US) He's a lucky stiff. [=he's very lucky]
• He was always lucky in love. [=he was always lucky in his romantic relationships]
2 : producing a good result by chance : resulting from good luck
• He scored a goal on a lucky shot.
• Their meeting was a lucky accident.
• We got a lucky break.
• It was a lucky coincidence that we were both there at the same time.
• a lucky find/guess
• It's lucky for us that the weather is so good. = We're lucky that the weather is so good.
• a lucky coin/charm
• This must be your lucky day. [=a day when something good happens because of good luck]
• You should thank your lucky stars [=you should be very grateful] that you have a friend like her.
get lucky
1 : to have good luck : to succeed because of good luck
• We thought all the tickets might have already been sold, but we got lucky—there were still a few left when we arrived.
2 informal : to succeed in finding or getting someone to have sex with you
• He's hoping to get lucky tonight.
third time lucky
- see 1third

reality

reality [noun]

the state of things as they are, rather than as they are imagined to be

US /riˈæl.ə.t̬i/ 
UK /riˈæl.ə.ti/ 

واقعيت‌، حقيقت

مثال: 

He escaped from reality by going to the cinema every afternoon.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

reality

 noun (no plural)
the way that something really is, not how you would like it to be:
I enjoyed my holiday, but now it's back to reality.
She looked very confident but in reality she was extremely nervous.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

reality

reality S2 W2 /riˈæləti, riˈælɪti/ BrE AmE noun (plural realities)
[Word Family: noun: ↑realism, ↑realist, ↑reality, ↑unreality, ↑realization; adverb: ↑real, ↑really, ↑realistically ≠ ↑unrealistically; adjective: ↑real, ↑unreal, ↑realistic ≠ ↑unrealistic; verb: ↑realize]
1. [uncountable and countable] what actually happens or is true, not what is imagined or thought:
the distinction between fantasy and reality
TV is used as an escape from reality.
I think the government has lost touch with reality (=no longer understands what is real or true).
political realities
harsh/grim/stark reality
Millions of people live with the harsh realities of unemployment.
the reality is that
The reality is that young people will not go into teaching until salaries are higher.
The paperless office may one day become a reality.
2. in reality used to say that something is different from what people think:
In reality, violent crimes are still extremely rare.
3. [uncountable] the fact that something exists or is happening:
She had never accepted the reality of her pregnancy.
⇨ ↑virtual reality
• • •
COLLOCATIONS
■ adjectives
the harsh/grim/stark reality (=conditions that are really very bad) We want to protect our children from the harsh reality of our violent world.
political/social/economic realities He's ignoring political realities.
■ verbs
face reality (=accept it) It's painful, but you have to face reality.
confront a reality (=consider or deal with it) They had to confront some unpleasant realities about themselves.
ignore a reality They are ignoring the reality of Arab politics.
wake up to reality (=realize what is happening or real) Well, they need to wake up to reality.
lose touch with reality (=no longer know about ordinary things or what is possible) If all you have is the show-business world, you kind of lose touch with reality.
escape from reality The programmes help viewers escape from reality.
bring somebody back to reality (=make them realize what is happening around them or true) She was brought back to reality by the pain in her ankle.
become a reality (=really happen, after being hoped for, feared, etc by someone) Last June, her longed-for baby finally became a reality.
reflect reality (=match or show what is really happening or true) Do these novels accurately reflect contemporary reality?
bear no relation to reality (=not match what is really happening or true) His vision of European politics bears no relation to reality.
be divorced from reality (=not connected in any way to what is really happening) His ideas are completely divorced from reality.
■ phrases
a dose of reality (=an experience of what things are really like) I got my first dose of reality when I reported to work at my new job.
somebody's grasp of reality (=their understanding of reality) They portrayed her as a sick woman with only a tenuous grasp of reality.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

reality

real·ity [reality realities]   [riˈæləti]    [riˈæləti]  noun (pl. real·ities)
1. uncountable the true situation and the problems that actually exist in life, in contrast to how you would like life to be
She refuses to face reality.
You're out of touch with reality.
• The reality is that there is not enough money to pay for this project.

• They seemed to have the perfect marriage but the reality was very different.

2. countable a thing that is actually experienced or seen, in contrast to what people might imagine
the harsh realities of life
This decision reflects the realities of the political situation.
• The paperless office is still far from being a reality.

• Will time travel ever become a reality?

3. uncountable ~ television/TV/shows/series/contestants television/shows, etc. that use real people (not actors) in real situations, presented as entertainment
a reality TV star
the reality show ‘Big Brother’
see also  virtual reality
Idiom: in reality  
Word Origin:
late 15th cent.: via French from medieval Latin realitas, from late Latin realis ‘relating to things’, from Latin res ‘thing’.  
Thesaurus:
reality noun U
Outwardly she seemed confident but in reality was very nervous.
factthe truthreal lifethe real world
Opp: fantasy
in reality/fact/real life/the real world
face/accept/ignore reality/the fact/the truth 
Example Bank:
He has a rather tenuous grasp of reality.
He has no illusions about the underlying reality of army life.
Her parents always tried to shield her from the realities of the world.
I don't think he understands the reality of the situation.
I don't think you have quite grasped the realities of our situation!
It's our task to make the proposals a reality.
It's time for a reality check: are these goals really achievable?
Most comedy relies on distorting reality.
Most people's ideas of the disease do not have much to do with the reality.
One day her dream will become a reality.
Painters at the time were largely concerned with reproducing external reality.
She will have to face reality sooner or later.
The director creates a believable, gritty reality.
The media portray her as happy and successful, but in reality she has a difficult life.
The movie portrays a kind of alternate reality.
The novel describes the harsh realities of racism and life on the road.
They are out of touch with the realities of modern warfare.
We were faced with the awful reality of having nowhere to live.
a book that captures the reality of life during wartime
the harsh economic realities of life as a student
the practical realities of running a children's home
the use of virtual reality in computer games
• She refuses to face reality.

• You're out of touch with reality.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

reality / riˈæl.ɪ.ti /   / -ə.t̬i / noun

B2 [ S or U ] the state of things as they are, rather than as they are imagined to be:

The reality of the situation is that unless we find some new funding soon, the youth centre will have to close.

He escaped from reality by going to the cinema every afternoon.

He seemed very young, but he was in reality (= in fact) older than all of us.

B2 [ C ] a fact:

The book confronts the harsh social and political realities of the world today.

Her childhood ambition became a reality (= happened in fact) when she was made a judge.

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

reality

[riæ̱lɪti]
 ♦♦
 realities

 1) N-UNCOUNT You use reality to refer to real things or the real nature of things rather than imagined, invented, or theoretical ideas.
 → See also virtual reality
  Fiction and reality were increasingly blurred...
  Psychiatrists become too caught up in their theories to deal adequately with reality.
  Ant:
  fiction
 2) N-COUNT: usu the N of n The reality of a situation is the truth about it, especially when it is unpleasant or difficult to deal with.
  ...the harsh reality of top international competition...
  Other psychoanalysts do accept the reality of child sexual abuse.
 3) N-SING You say that something has become a reality when it actually exists or is actually happening.
  ...the whole procedure that made this book become a reality...
  The reality is that they are poor.
 4) PHRASE: PHR with cl You can use in reality to introduce a statement about the real nature of something, when it contrasts with something incorrect that has just been described.
  He came across as streetwise, but in reality he was not.
  Syn:
  in fact

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

1re·al·i·ty /riˈæləti/ noun, pl -ties
1 [noncount] : the true situation that exists : the real situation
• He refused to face/accept reality. [=the truth]
• the difference between fiction/fantasy and reality
• She's out of touch with reality. [=she does not know what is really true]
• The reality is that we can't afford to buy a house.
• He used television as an escape from reality.
2 [count] : something that actually exists or happens : a real event, occurrence, situation, etc.
• The movie shows the harsh/grim/stark realities of war. [=the things that really happen in a war]
• Her dream of competing in the Olympics became a reality. [=she competed in the Olympics, as she had dreamed of doing]
• They made the plan a reality.
- see also virtual reality
in reality : in truth - used to stress that something is true or real especially when it is different from what was believed or expected
• They talked as if they had accomplished a lot, but in reality they did very little.
In reality, she was 15 years younger than she looked.

posse

posse [noun]

a group of people who have come together for the same purpose

US /ˈpɑː.si/ 
UK /ˈpɒs.i/ 

دسته، گروه

مثال: 

The disgraced minister walked swiftly from the car to his house pursued by a whole posse of reporters.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

posse

posse /ˈpɒsi $ ˈpɑːsi/ BrE AmE noun [countable]
[Date: 1600-1700; Language: Medieval Latin; Origin: posse comitatus 'power of the county']
1. informal a group of the same kind of people
posse of
I was surrounded by a posse of photographers.
2. a group of men gathered together by a ↑sheriff (=local law officer) in the US in past times to help catch a criminal
3. American English informal
a) someone’s group of friends – used especially by young people
b) a group of friends from a particular place who share an interest in ↑rap, HIP-HOP, or ↑house music SYN massive British English

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

posse

posse [posse posses]   [ˈpɒsi]    [ˈpɑːsi]  noun
1. (informal) a group of people who are similar in some way, or who spend time together

• a little posse of helpers

 

2. (in the US in the past) a group of people who were brought together by a sheriff (= an officer of the law) in order to help him catch a criminal

3. (informal) a group of young men involved in crime connected with drugs 
Word Origin:
mid 17th cent.: from medieval Latin, literally power, from Latin posse ‘be able’.  
Example Bank:
• He was sat at a corner table and surrounded by a posse of attentive waiters.

• She arrived at the theatre followed by the usual press posse.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

posse / ˈpɒs.i /   / ˈpɑː.si / noun [ C , + sing/pl verb ]

a group of people who have come together for the same purpose:

The disgraced minister walked swiftly from the car to his house pursued by a whole posse of reporters.

in the past, a group of men in the US who were brought together to catch a criminal:

The sheriff rounded up a posse and went after the bank robbers.

slang a group of friends:

I was hanging with my posse.

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

posse

[pɒ̱si]
 posses
 1) N-COUNT: N of n A posse of people is a group of people with the same job or purpose. [INFORMAL]
  He refused to engage in conversation with a posse of reporters when leaving Belmont...
  A posse of Marsh's friends persuaded them that this was a bad idea.
  Syn:
  group
 2) N-COUNT In former times, in the United States, a posse was a group of men who were brought together by the local law officer to help him chase and capture a criminal.

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

posse

pos·se /ˈpɑːsi/ noun, pl -ses [count]
1 : a group of people who were gathered together by a sheriff in the past to help search for a criminal
• The sheriff and his posse rode out to look for the bandits.
2 informal : a group of people who are together for a particular purpose - often + of
• A posse of reporters greeted the coach.
3 informal : a group of friends : gang
• I went to the game with my posse.
• The movie star and his posse [=(more formally) entourage] were seen at the new restaurant.

media

media [noun] (NEWSPAPER)

the internet, newspapers, magazines, television, etc., considered as a group

US /ˈmiː.di.ə/ 
UK /ˈmiː.di.ə/ 

رسانه های گروهی (خصوصاً تلویزیون،رادیو و روزنامه)

مثال: 

the local/national media

Oxford Essential Dictionary

media

 noun (no plural)

the media television, radio and newspapers:
The media always takes a great interest in the royal family.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

media

media S2 W2 AC /ˈmiːdiə/ BrE AmE noun
[Date: 1900-2000; Origin: Plural of ↑medium2]
1. the media all the organizations, such as television, radio, and newspapers, that provide news and information for the public, or the people who do this work:
The scandal was widely reported in the national media.
The role of the news media in forming public opinion is very important.
The 11-day trial generated intense media interest.
A great deal of media hype surrounded the release of the group’s latest CD.
There will be another war somewhere else and the whole international media circus will move on.
GRAMMAR
People sometimes use a singular verb after media but it is better to use a plural verb:
▪ The media were widely distrusted.
2. the plural of ↑medium ⇨ ↑mass media, ↑multimedia
• • •
COLLOCATIONS
■ ADJECTIVES/NOUN + media
the national/local media The case received enormous publicity in the national media.
the news media Does the news media have a role in forming public opinion?
the mass media (=television, newspapers etc, which are seen by many people) The mass media has helped to call attention to environmental issues.
the mainstream/popular media (=television, newspapers etc, that most people are able to see or read) Few of these events were reported in the mainstream media.
■ media + NOUN
media attention/coverage/interest etc The tragedy received worldwide media attention.
a media campaign (=when something is deliberately reported or advertised in the media a lot) a media campaign aimed at reducing drunk driving
a media blitz (=when something is deliberately reported or advertised in the media a lot, in a small amount of time) The candidate’s media blitz has certainly raised his profile in the election.
media hype (=when the media give something too much attention and try to make it seem more important or better than it really is) the media hype surrounding the match against France
a media circus (=a disapproving phrase for all the people from the media who report events, and all the attention they give to these events) There is likely to be a media circus outside the courtroom.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

media

media AW [media mediae]   [ˈmiːdiə]    [ˈmiːdiə]  noun
1. the media uncountable + singular or plural verb the main ways that large numbers of people receive information and entertainment, that is television, radio, newspapers and the Internet
the news/broadcasting/national media
The trial was fully reported in the media.
The media was/were accused of influencing the final decision.
Any event attended by the actor received widespread media coverage.
• He became a media star for his part in the protests.

see also  mass media, new media

2. pl. of  medium  
Thesaurus:
the
media noun sing.+ sing./pl. v.
The media was accused of influencing the decision.
the presscoveragereportingjournalism|formal reportage
in/by the media/press
(the) mainstream media/press/coverage/reporting/journalism
the national/local/free/foreign media/press 
Example Bank:
Music has been turned into a series of media events.
One story has dominated the media this week.
She's very different from her media image.
Some blame the media for propagating negative stereotypes.
The company is anxious to play down the media hype.
The event was widely covered by the mass media.
The local media reported rioting across the country.
The two gangsters were media darlings in the 60s.
Their PR officer handles TV, radio, and print media interviews.
There is a perception that the government controls the media.
There was a lot of media coverage of the wedding.
They believe that the media is biased against them.
• They broadcast streaming media to PCs.

• propaganda through the media

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

media / ˈmiː.di.ə / noun (NEWSPAPERS)

the media B2 [ S , + sing/pl verb ] the internet, newspapers, magazines, television, etc., considered as a group:

the local/national media

media attention/coverage/hype/reports

The issue has been much discussed in the media.

→  See also multimedia

 

media / ˈmiː.di.ə / noun (MEDIUM)

plural of medium noun (METHOD)

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

media

[mi͟ːdiə]
 ♦♦
 1) N-SING-COLL: the N You can refer to television, radio, newspapers, and magazines as the media.
 → See also mass media, multimedia
  It is hard work and not a glamorous job as portrayed by the media...
  They are wondering whether bias in the news media contributed to the president's defeat...
  Media coverage of cycling in July was pretty impressive.
 2) Media is a plural of medium.

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

media
 

2me·dia /ˈmiːdijə/ noun [plural]
1 : the radio stations, television stations, and newspapers through which information is communicated to the public : mass media
• The event attracted a lot of attention from the media. = The event attracted a lot of media attention.
• the news media
- sometimes used with a singular verb
• He feels that the media is ignoring this important issue.
2 chiefly US : people who work as news reporters, publishers, and broadcasters : members of the media
• The event attracted a lot of media.
• a large crowd of media

social media

social media [noun]

websites and computer programs that allow people to communicate and share information on the internet using a computer or mobile phone

US /ˌsoʊ.ʃəl ˈmiː.di.ə/ 
UK /ˌsəʊ.ʃəl ˈmiː.di.ə/ 

شبکه‌های اجتماعی

مثال: 

Companies are increasingly making use of social media in order to market their goods.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

social ˈmedia 
BrE  ; NAmE  
[uncountable, plural]
websites and software programs used for social networking Companies need to invest in social media to make it work for them.
 social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter 
Social media are changing the way people communicate, work, and shop.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

ˌ social ˈ media noun [ U or plural ]

websites and computer programs that allow people to communicate and share information on the internet using a computer or mobile phone :

Companies are increasingly making use of social media in order to market their goods.

© Cambridge University Press 2013

French fries

French fries [noun]

long, thin pieces of fried potato

سيب‌ زمينى‌ سرخ‌ كرده‌

Oxford Essential Dictionary

chips

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

French fries

French fries plural noun (ALSO fries) MAINLY US
long thin pieces of fried potato

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

ˌ French ˈ fries noun [ plural ] ( also fries ) mainly US

long, thin pieces of fried potato

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

French fries

 N-PLURAL
 French fries are long, thin pieces of potato fried in oil or fat.

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

french fry
 

french fry or French fry noun, pl ~ fries [count] chiefly US : a long, thin piece of potato that is fried in deep fat - called also (Brit) chip, (US) fry,

veggie

veggie [noun]

UK informal a vegetarian noun, US and Australian English informal a vegetable

US /ˈvedʒ.i/ 
UK /ˈvedʒ.i/ 

غیر رسمی vegetarian

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

veggie

I. veggie1 /ˈvedʒi/ BrE AmE noun [countable]
[Date: 1900-2000; Origin: vegetable]
1. a ↑vegetarian
2. American English a ↑vegetable:
fresh veggies

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

veggie

 

▪ I. veg·gie [veggie veggies]   [ˈvedʒi]    [ˈvedʒi]  noun (informal)
1. (BrE) =  vegetarian

• He's turned veggie (= become a vegetarian ).

2. (especially NAmE) =  vegetable  
Word Origin:

1970s: abbreviation.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

veggie / ˈvedʒ.i / noun [ C ] ( also veggy )

UK informal a vegetarian noun

US and Australian English informal a vegetable

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

veggie

[ve̱ʤi]
 veggies
 1) ADJ Veggie means the same as vegetarian. [mainly BRIT, INFORMAL]
  You can cook a cheap veggie chilli in 15 minutes...
  Going veggie can be tasty, easy and healthy too.
 N-COUNT
 A veggie is someone who is vegetarian.
 2) N-COUNT: usu pl Veggies are plants such as cabbages, potatoes, and onions which you can cook and eat. [mainly AM, INFORMAL]
  ...well-balanced meals of fresh fruit and veggies, chicken, fish, pasta, and no red meat.(in BRIT, usually use veg)

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

veggie

veg·gie /ˈvɛʤi/ noun, pl -gies [count] informal
1 chiefly US : vegetable 1
• Eat your veggies.
• fresh veggies
2 chiefly Brit : vegetarian
• The restaurant is popular with veggies.

sandwich

sandwich [noun]

two pieces of bread, sometimes spread with butter or margarine, and with some other usually cold food between them

US /ˈsæn.wɪtʃ/ 
UK /ˈsæn.wɪdʒ/ 

ساندويچ

مثال: 

a tuna/ham sandwich

Oxford Essential Dictionary

sandwich

 noun (plural sandwiches)
two pieces of bread with other food between them:
a cheese sandwich

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

sandwich

I. sandwich1 S2 /ˈsænwɪdʒ $ ˈsændwɪtʃ, ˈsænwɪtʃ/ BrE AmE noun
[Date: 1700-1800; Origin: Earl of Sandwich (1718-92), who ate sandwiches so that he could continue gambling without leaving the table]

1. [countable] two pieces of bread with cheese, meat, cooked egg etc between them:
a ham sandwich
2. [countable] British English a cake consisting of two layers with ↑jam and cream between them:
a raspberry sponge sandwich
⇨ ↑club sandwich, ↑open sandwich

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

sandwich

 

sand·wich [sandwich sandwiches sandwiched sandwiching] noun, verb   [ˈsænwɪtʃ]    [ˈsænwɪtʃ]    [ˈsænwɪdʒ]    [ˈsænwɪdʒ] 

 

noun
1. (also BrE informal sar·nie) two slices of bread, often spread with butter, with a layer of meat, cheese, etc. between them
a cheese sandwich
a sandwich bar (= a place that sells sandwiches )

see also  club sandwich, open sandwich

2. (BrE) (in compounds) a sponge cake consisting of two layers with jam and/or cream between them
a chocolate sponge sandwich
a sandwich tin (= for baking such a cake in)  
Word Origin:
mid 18th cent.: named after the 4th Earl of Sandwich (1718–92), an English nobleman said to have eaten food in this form so as not to leave the gaming table.  
Example Bank:
He made two rounds of tuna sandwiches.
What would you like in your sandwich?
• a peanut butter and jelly sandwich

Derived: sandwich A and B together  sandwich somebody between somebody 

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

sandwich / ˈsæn.wɪdʒ /   / -wɪtʃ / noun [ C ]

sandwich

A1 two pieces of bread, sometimes spread with butter or margarine, and with some other usually cold food between them:

a tuna/ham sandwich

a toasted sandwich

a sandwich bar/box

sandwich fillings

( also sandwich cake ) UK a cake consisting of two thin, round layers with a filling such as cream between them:

a jam and cream sandwich

a Victoria sandwich

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

sandwich

[sæ̱nwɪʤ, -wɪtʃ]
 sandwiches, sandwiching, sandwiched
 1) N-COUNT A sandwich usually consists of two slices of bread with a layer of food such as cheese or meat between them.
  ...a ham sandwich.
 2) VERB If you sandwich two things together with something else, you put that other thing between them. If you sandwich one thing between two other things, you put it between them.
  [V pl-n together] Carefully split the sponge ring, then sandwich the two halves together with whipped cream...
  [V n between pl-n] When you write, avoid sandwiching the bad news between an irrelevant, indirect, or overly cushioned beginning and end.
 3) → See also sandwiched

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

1sand·wich /ˈsændˌwɪʧ, Brit ˈsænˌwɪʤ/ noun, pl -wich·es [count]
1 : two pieces of bread with something (such as meat, peanut butter, etc.) between them
• I had a ham sandwich for lunch.
• a peanut butter and jelly sandwich
- see also club sandwich, open-faced sandwich
2 : two or more cookies, crackers, or slices of cake with something between them
• (chiefly US) an ice-cream sandwich [=two cookies with ice cream between them]

unhealthy

unhealthy [adjective]

not good for your health, or not strong and well

US /ʌnˈhel.θi/ 
UK /ʌnˈhel.θi/ 

ناسالم‌، مضر

مثال: 

an unhealthy diet

Oxford Essential Dictionary

unhealthy

 adjective (unhealthier, unhealthiest)

1 not well; often ill:
an unhealthy child

2 that can make you ill:
unhealthy food
 opposite healthy

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

unhealthy

unhealthy /ʌnˈhelθi/ BrE AmE adjective (comparative unhealthier, superlative unhealthiest)
[Word Family: noun: ↑health, ↑healthiness; adverb: ↑healthily ≠ ↑unhealthily; adjective: ↑healthy ≠ ↑unhealthy]
1. likely to make you ill:
unhealthy living conditions
2. not normal or natural and likely to be harmful:
an unhealthy relationship
unhealthy interest/obsession/fear etc
Gareth had an unhealthy interest in death.
3. not physically healthy SYN ill, sick:
an unhealthy baby
4. unhealthy skin, hair etc shows that you are ill or not healthy:
an unhealthy pale complexion

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

unhealthy

 

un·healthy [unhealthy unhealthier unhealthiest]   [ʌnˈhelθi]    [ʌnˈhelθi]  adjective
1. not having good health; showing a lack of good health
They looked poor and unhealthy.
• unhealthy skin

• His eyeballs were an unhealthy yellow.

2. harmful to your health; likely to make you ill/sick
• unhealthy living conditions

• an unhealthy diet/lifestyle

3. not normal and likely to be harmful
Syn:  unwholesome
He had an unhealthy interest in disease and death.
Opp:  healthy
Derived Word: unhealthily  
Example Bank:
The miners worked in very unhealthy conditions.
Doctors say too many teenagers adopt an unhealthy lifestyle.
Just taking vitamin tablets will not turn an unhealthy diet into a good one.
• The unhealthy climate made it an unattractive place in which to settle.

• Tuberculosis often affects people in unhealthy living conditions.

 

 

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

unhealthy / ʌnˈhel.θi / adjective

B1 not good for your health, or not strong and well:

an unhealthy diet

 

unhealthily / -θɪ.li / adverb

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

unhealthy

[ʌnhe̱lθi]
 unhealthier, unhealthiest
 1) ADJ-GRADED Something that is unhealthy is likely to cause illness or poor health.
  Avoid unhealthy foods such as hamburger and chips...
  He worked in the notoriously unhealthy environment of a coal mine.
  Ant:
  healthy
 2) ADJ-GRADED If you are unhealthy, you are not very fit or well.
  I'm quite unhealthy really.
  ...a poorly dressed, unhealthy looking fellow with a poor complexion.
  Ant:
  healthy
 3) ADJ-GRADED An unhealthy economy or company is financially weak and unsuccessful.
  The redundancy of skilled and experienced workers is a terrible waste and a clear sign of an unhealthy economy.
  Syn:
  weak
  Ant:
  strong
 4) ADJ-GRADED If you describe someone's behaviour or interests as unhealthy, you do not consider them to be normal and think they may involve mental problems.
  Frank has developed what I would term an unhealthy relationship with these people...
  This government has a developed an unhealthy obsession with secrecy...
  MacGregor believes it is unhealthy to lead a life with no interests beyond politics.
  Ant:
  healthy

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

unhealthy

un·healthy /ˌʌnˈhɛlɵi/ adj un·health·i·er; -est [or more ~; most ~] : not healthy: such as
a : not having or showing good health
• an unhealthy liver
unhealthy workers
• Her skin looks blotchy and unhealthy.
b : harmful to your health : likely to make you sick
unhealthy eating habits
• Tests revealed an unhealthy level of lead in the water.
• Eating honey can be unhealthy for babies.
c : not doing well : not successful
• an unhealthy economy
• a financially unhealthy company
d : involving or causing feelings and thoughts that are not normal and healthy
• He was stuck in an unhealthy relationship.
• She has an unhealthy interest in natural disasters.

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