A2 (مبتدی)

menu

menu [noun] (FOOD)

a list of the food that you can eat in a restaurant

US /ˈmen.juː/ 
UK /ˈmen.juː/ 

منوی غذا، لیست غذا

مثال: 

The waiter brought the menu and the wine list.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

menu

 noun (plural menus)

1 a list of the food that you can choose in a restaurant:
What's on the menu tonight?
Can I have the menu, please?

2 (computing) a list on the screen of a computer that shows what you can do:
Go to the menu and click New.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

menu

menu S3 /ˈmenjuː/ BrE AmE noun [countable]
[Date: 1800-1900; Language: French; Origin: menu 'small, full of details', from Latin minutus; ⇨ ↑minute2]
1. a list of all the kinds of food that are available for a meal, especially in a restaurant:
Could we have the menu, please?
on the menu
Is there any fish on the menu?
a three course set menu (=dishes which you do not choose for yourself)
2. a list of things on a computer screen which you can ask the computer to do:
Select PRINT from the main menu.
pull-down/drop-down menu (=a list of choices which appears when you CLICK ON a place on the screen)
menu-driven (=operated by using a menu)
• • •
COLLOCATIONS
■ verbs
read/study the menu Sandy read the menu, but didn’t see anything he wanted to eat.
look at/see the menu (=read the menu) He looked at the menu and decided to have the salad.
plan a menu (=decide what foods will be served) Erika began planning a menu for the dinner party.
choose/order something from the menu He ordered a chicken dish from the menu.
offer a menu The restaurant is offering a three-course menu for New Year’s Eve.
have a good/long/unusual etc menu The new restaurant on Fifth Street has an excellent menu.
■ ADJECTIVES/NOUN + menu
extensive (=with many different dishes on it) The menu is extensive and adventurous.
a dinner/lunch/breakfast menu There is an extensive dinner menu, and seafood is a speciality.
a set/fixed menu (=when the cook decides which dishes will be served to you, rather than you choosing for yourself) Dinner is three courses from a set menu.
an à la carte menu (=a menu listing many separate dishes which you choose from) In the evening there is a full à la carte menu.
a children’s menu I asked the waiter if there was a children’s menu.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

menu

menu [menu menus]   [ˈmenjuː] Click to play  [ˈmenjuː] Click to playnoun
1. a list of the food that is available at a restaurant or to be served at a meal
to ask for/look at the menu

What's on the menu (= for dinner) tonight?

2. (computing) a list of possible choices that are shown on a computer screen
a pull-down menu
see also  drop-down menu  
Word Origin:
mid 19th cent.: from French, detailed list (noun use of menu ‘small, detailed’), from Latin minutus ‘very small’.  
Collocations:
Restaurants
Eating out
eat (lunch/dinner)/dine/meet at/in a restaurant
go (out)/take sb (out) for lunch/dinner/a meal
have a meal with sb
make/have a reservation (in/under the name of Yamada)
reserve/ (especially BrE) book a table for six
ask for/request a table for two/a table by the window
In the restaurant
wait to be seated
show sb to their table
sit in the corner/by the window/at the bar/at the counter
hand sb/give sb the menu/wine list
open/read/study/peruse the menu
the restaurant has a three-course set menu/a children's menu/an extensive wine list
taste/sample/try the wine
the waiter takes your order
order/choose/have the soup of the day/one of the specials/the house (BrE) speciality/(especially NAmE) specialty
serve/finish the first course/the starter/the main course/dessert/coffee
complain about the food/the service/your meal
enjoy your meal
Paying
pay/ask for (especially BrE) the bill/(NAmE) the check
pay for/treat sb to dinner/lunch/the meal
service is (not) included
give sb/leave (sb) a tip 
Example Bank:
Chef Nigel Crowther will expand the menu to include several vegetarian options.
Go to the topic menu in the upper right hand corner.
Many menus now list ingredients.
Many restaurants do a very reasonable set menu at lunchtime.
May we have the menu?
Passengers are offered a daily choice of menu.
She completely changes her seasonal menus every few months.
The chef was chalking the daily specials on the menu board.
The menu changes daily.
The restaurant changes its menu every six months.
What's on the menu this evening?
You'll find it in the topic menu.
a menu offering many vegetarian dishes
a ten-course tasting menu

buttons that make it easy to navigate the on-screen menu

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

menu / ˈmen.juː / noun [ C ] (FOOD)

A2 a list of the food that you can eat in a restaurant:

The waiter brought the menu and the wine list.

What's on the menu today?

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

menu

[me̱njuː]
 menus
 1) N-COUNT: usu sing In a restaurant or café, or at a formal meal, the menu is a list of the meals and drinks that are available.
  A waiter offered him the menu...
  Even the most elaborate dishes on the menu were quite low on calories.
 2) N-COUNT A menu is the food that you serve at a meal.
  Try out the menu on a few friends...
  The menu is all-important. Every component of every meal should create contrasts.
 3) N-COUNT On a computer screen, a menu is a list of choices. Each choice represents something that you can do using the computer.

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

menu

menu /ˈmɛnˌjuː/ noun, pl men·us [count]
1 a : a list of the foods that may be ordered at a restaurant
• I'd like to see your lunch menu, please.
• What's good on the menu today?
• There are two chicken dishes under eight dollars listed on the menu.
b : the foods that are served at a meal
• When you're planning a dinner party, the choice of (the/your) menu is very important.
2 : a list of things that you can choose from
• a menu of television programs especially; computers : a list shown on a computer from which you make choices to control what the computer does
• You can save your work by choosing “Save” from the “File” menu.
- see also drop-down menu, pull-down menu

dessert

dessert [noun]

sweet food eaten at the end of a meal

US /dɪˈzɝːt/ 
UK /dɪˈzɜːt/ 

دسر

مثال: 

For dessert there's apple pie or fruit.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

dessert

 noun

spelling
Remember! You spell dessert with SS.

something sweet that you eat at the end of a meal same meaning pudding:
We had ice cream for dessert.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

dessert

dessert /dɪˈzɜːt $ -ɜːrt/ BrE AmE noun [uncountable and countable]
[Date: 1500-1600; Language: French; Origin: desservir 'to clear the table', from servir 'to serve']
sweet food served after the main part of a meal
for dessert
What are we having for dessert?
• • •
THESAURUS
■ parts of a large meal
hors d'oeuvre (also starter British English, appetizer American English) the small first part of a meal: a tempting plate of hors d'oeuvres including olives and small pieces of roast beetroot
main course (also entrée especially American English) the main part of a meal. entrée is used especially on restaurant ↑menus: For the main course we had cheese and onion pie. | The menu includes a few hot entrées.
dessert (also pudding British English or sweet British English) sweet food eaten at the end of a meal: What do you want for dessert? | They serve a wide range of desserts, including ice cream and home-made apple pie.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

dessert

des·sert [dessert desserts]   [dɪˈzɜːt]    [dɪˈzɜːrt]  noun uncountable, countable
sweet food eaten at the end of a meal
What's for dessert?
a rich chocolate dessert
a dessert wine
(BrE) the dessert trolley (= a table on wheels from which you choose your dessert  in a restaurant)
compare  afters, pudding, sweet  
Word Origin:
mid 16th cent.: from French, past participle of desservir ‘clear the table’, from des- (expressing removal) + servir ‘to serve’.  
Collocations:
Restaurants
Eating out
eat (lunch/dinner)/dine/meet at/in a restaurant
go (out)/take sb (out) for lunch/dinner/a meal
have a meal with sb
make/have a reservation (in/under the name of Yamada)
reserve/ (especially BrE) book a table for six
ask for/request a table for two/a table by the window
In the restaurant
wait to be seated
show sb to their table
sit in the corner/by the window/at the bar/at the counter
hand sb/give sb the menu/wine list
open/read/study/peruse the menu
the restaurant has a three-course set menu/a children's menu/an extensive wine list
taste/sample/try the wine
the waiter takes your order
order/choose/have the soup of the day/one of the specials/the house (BrE) speciality/(especially NAmE) specialty
serve/finish the first course/the starter/the main course/dessert/coffee
complain about the food/the service/your meal
enjoy your meal
Paying
pay/ask for (especially BrE) the bill/(NAmE) the check
pay for/treat sb to dinner/lunch/the meal
service is (not) included
give sb/leave (sb) a tip 
Example Bank:
The waiter asked us if we'd like to order a dessert.
This chestnut pudding is a rich dessert with a festive flavour.
• We finished off with a dessert of honey and nuts.

• We had mousse for dessert.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

dessert / dɪˈzɜːt /   / -ˈzɝːt / noun [ C or U ]

A2 sweet food eaten at the end of a meal:

a dessert fork/spoon

For dessert there's apple pie or fruit.

If you make the main course, I'll make a dessert.

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

 dessert

[dɪzɜ͟ː(r)t]
 desserts
 N-MASS
 Dessert is something sweet, such as fruit or a pudding, that you eat at the end of a meal.
  She had homemade ice cream for dessert...
  I am partial to desserts that combine fresh fruit with fine pastry.
 Syn:
 sweet, pudding

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

dessert

des·sert /dɪˈzɚt/ noun, pl -serts : sweet food eaten after the main part of a meal

[count]

• She doesn't care for rich desserts.
• a chocolate dessert

[noncount]

• Coffee and tea will be served with dessert.
• We had ice cream and apple pie for dessert.
- sometimes used before another noun
• They asked to look at the dessert menu.
dessert plates

salad

salad [noun]

a mixture of uncooked vegetables, usually including lettuce, eaten either as a separate dish or with other food

 

US /ˈsæl.əd/ 
UK /ˈsæl.əd/ 

سالاد

مثال: 

Serve the risotto with a mixed salad.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

salad

 noun
a dish of cold vegetables that have not been cooked:
Do you want chips or salad with your chicken?

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

salad

salad S2 /ˈsæləd/ BrE AmE noun [uncountable and countable]
[Date: 1300-1400; Language: Old French; Origin: salade, from Old Provençal salada, from salar 'to add salt to', from sal 'salt']

1. a mixture of raw vegetables, especially ↑lettuce, ↑cucumber, and tomato:
Would you like some salad with your pasta?
a spinach salad
toss a salad (=mix it all together, usually with a dressing)
2. raw or cooked food cut into small pieces and served cold
fruit/potato salad
 

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

salad

 

salad [salad salads]   [ˈsæləd]    [ˈsæləd]  noun

1. uncountable, countable a mixture of raw vegetables such as lettuce, tomato and cucumber, usually served with other food as part of a meal
All main courses come with salad or vegetables.
Is cold meat and salad OK for lunch?
a side salad (= a small bowl of salad served with the main course of a meal)
a salad bowl (= a large bowl for serving salad in)

see also  Caesar salad, green salad

2. countable, uncountable (in compounds) meat, fish, cheese, etc. served with salad

• a chicken salad

3. uncountable, countable (in compounds) raw or cooked vegetables, etc. that are cut into small pieces, often mixed with mayonnaise and served cold with other food
potato salad
• a pasta salad

see also  fruit salad

4. uncountable any green vegetable, especially lettuce, that is eaten raw in a salad
salad plants
Idiom: your salad days  
Word Origin:
late Middle English: from Old French salade, from Provençal salada, based on Latin sal ‘salt’.  
Collocations:
Cooking
Preparing
prepare a dish/a meal/a menu/dinner/the fish
weigh out 100g/4oz of sugar/the ingredients
wash/rinse the lettuce/spinach/watercress
chop/slice/dice the carrots/onions/potatoes
peel the carrots/onion/potatoes/garlic/orange
grate a carrot/the cheese/some nutmeg
remove/discard the bones/seeds/skin
blend/combine/mix (together) the flour and water/all the ingredients
beat/whisk the cream/eggs/egg whites
knead/shape/roll (out) the dough
Cooking
heat the oil in a frying pan
preheat/heat the oven/(BrE) the grill/(NAmE) the broiler
bring to (BrE) the boil/(NAmE) a boil
stir constantly/gently with a wooden spoon
reduce the heat
simmer gently for 20 minutes/until reduced by half
melt the butter/chocolate/cheese/sugar
brown the meat for 8-20 minutes
drain the pasta/the water from the pot/in a colander
mash the potatoes/banana/avocado
Ways of cooking
cook food/fish/meat/rice/pasta/a Persian dish
bake (a loaf of) bread/a cake/(especially NAmE) cookies/(BrE) biscuits/a pie/potatoes/fish/scones/muffins
boil cabbage/potatoes/an egg/water
fry/deep-fry/stir-fry the chicken/vegetables
grill meat/steak/chicken/sausages/a hot dog
roast potatoes/peppers/meat/chicken/lamb
sauté garlic/mushrooms/onions/potatoes/vegetables
steam rice/vegetables/spinach/asparagus/dumplings
toast bread/nuts
microwave food/popcorn/(BrE) a ready meal
Serving
serve in a glass/on a bed of rice/with potatoes
arrange the slices on a plate/in a layer
carve the meat/lamb/chicken/turkey
dress/toss a salad
dress with/drizzle with olive oil/vinaigrette
top with a slice of lemon/a scoop of ice cream/whipped cream/syrup
garnish with a sprig of parsley/fresh basil leaves/lemon wedges/a slice of lime/a twist of orange
sprinkle with salt/sugar/herbs/parsley/freshly ground black pepper 
Example Bank:
Is the steak served with a side salad?
• She tossed and dressed the salad.

• The sandwiches came with a rather limp salad garnish.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

salad / ˈsæl.əd / noun [ C or U ]

salad

A2 a mixture of uncooked vegetables, usually including lettuce, eaten either as a separate dish or with other food:

Toss (= mix) the salad with a vinaigrette dressing.

Serve the risotto with a mixed salad.

a salad bowl

cheese, egg, etc. salad

cheese, egg, etc. with salad

cooked or uncooked vegetables cut into very small pieces and often mixed with mayonnaise:

potato salad

rice/pasta salad

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

salad

[sæ̱ləd]
 salads
 1) N-VAR A salad is a mixture of raw foods such as lettuce, cucumber, and tomatoes. It is often served with other food as part of a meal.
 → See also fruit salad
  ...a salad of tomato, onion and cucumber.
  ...potato salad.
 2) PHRASE If you refer to your salad days, you are referring to a period of your life when you were young and inexperienced. [LITERARY]
  The Grand Hotel did not seem to have changed since her salad days.

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

salad
sal·ad /ˈsæləd/ noun, pl -ads
1 : a mixture of raw green vegetables (such as different types of lettuce) usually combined with other raw vegetables

[count]

• For dinner we had roast chicken and a salad.
• a salad of fresh/local greens
• a spinach salad
• I tossed the salad with some oil and vinegar and set it on the table.

[noncount]

• a bowl of salad
• Would you like soup or salad with your sandwich?
salad greens [=vegetables that are grown for their leaves and commonly used in salads]
2 [count, noncount] : a mixture of small pieces of raw or cooked food (such as pasta, meat, fruit, eggs, or vegetables) combined usually with a dressing and served cold
• a delicious pasta/potato/fruit salad
• chicken/tuna salad

worry

worry [verb] (PROBLEM)

to think about problems or unpleasant things that might happen in a way that makes you feel unhappy and frightened

US /ˈwɝː.i/ 
UK /ˈwʌr.i/ 

نگران بودن

مثال: 

Don't worry, she'll be all right.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

 verb (worries, worrying, worried /, has worried)
to feel that something bad will happen or has happened; to make somebody feel this:
I always worry when Mark doesn't come home at the usual time.
Don't worry if you don't know the answer.
There's nothing to worry about.
What worries me is how we are going to get home.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

worry

I. worry1 S1 W2 /ˈwʌri $ ˈwɜːri/ BrE AmE verb (past tense and past participle worried, present participle worrying, third person singular worries)
[Word Family: adjective: ↑worried ≠ UNWORRIED, ↑worrying, ↑worrisome; noun: ↑worry, ↑worrier; adverb: ↑worryingly, ↑worriedly; verb: ↑worry]
[Language: Old English; Origin: wyrgan 'to strangle']
1. BE ANXIOUS [intransitive] to be anxious or unhappy about someone or something, so that you think about them a lot
worry about
I worry about my daughter.
You’ve really got no need to worry about your weight.
worry (that)
She worried that she wasn’t doing enough to help.
worry over
Dad worries over the slightest thing.
Don’t tell Mum about this – she’s got enough to worry about (=she already has a lot of problems or is very busy).
2. don’t worry spoken
a) used when you are trying to make someone feel less anxious:
Don’t worry, darling, Daddy’s here.
don’t worry if
Don’t worry if you can’t finish all the questions.
b) used to tell someone that they do not need to do something
don’t worry about
Don’t worry about sorting them out – I’ll do it later.
c) used to tell someone that you will definitely do something:
Don’t you worry, I’ll make sure he does his fair share.
3. MAKE SOMEBODY ANXIOUS [transitive] to make someone feel anxious about something:
The recent changes in the Earth’s climate are beginning to worry scientists.
I didn’t tell Mum and Dad – I didn’t want to worry them.
what worries me is .../the (only) thing that worries me is ...
The only thing that worries me is the food. I don’t want to get food poisoning.
Doesn’t it worry you that Sarah spends so much time away from home?
worry yourself (=feel anxious, especially when there is no need to)
You’re worrying yourself unnecessarily.
4. not to worry British English spoken used to say that something is not important:
Not to worry, we can always go another time.
5. nothing to worry about spoken used to tell someone that something is not as serious or difficult as they think:
It’s just a check-up – nothing to worry about.
6. ANNOY [transitive] to annoy someone SYN bother:
The heat didn’t seem to worry him.
7. ANIMAL [transitive] if a dog worries sheep, it tries to bite or kill them
worry at something phrasal verb
1. if an animal worries at a bone or piece of meat, it bites and shakes it
2. if you worry at a problem, you think about it a lot in order to find a solution

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

worry

worry [worry worries worried worrying] verb, noun   [ˈwʌri]    [ˈwɜːri] 

 

verb (wor·ries, worry·ing, wor·ried, wor·ried)
1. intransitive to keep thinking about unpleasant things that might happen or about problems that you have
Don't worry. We have plenty of time.
~ about sb/sth Don't worry about me. I'll be all right.
He's always worrying about his weight.
~ over sb/sth There's no point in worrying over things you can't change.

~ (that)… I worry that I won't get into college.

2. transitive to make sb/yourself anxious about sb/sth
~ sb/yourself (about sb/sth) What worries me is how I am going to get another job.
~ sb/yourself + adj. (about sb/sth) He's worried himself sick (= become extremely anxious) about his daughter.
it worries sb that… It worries me that he hasn't come home yet.

it worries sb to do sth It worried me to think what might happen.

3. transitive to annoy or disturb sb
~ sb The noise never seems to worry her.

~ sb with sth Don't keep worrying him with a lot of silly questions.

4. transitive ~ sth (of a dog) to attack animals, especially sheep, by chasing and/or biting them
Verb forms:
 
Word Origin:
Old English wyrgan ‘strangle’, of West Germanic origin. In Middle English the original sense of the verb gave rise to the meaning ‘seize by the throat and tear’, later figuratively ‘harass’, which led to the sense ‘cause anxiety to’ (early 19th century, the date also of the noun).  
Example Bank:
Don't bother Harry— he has enough to worry about as it is.
Don't let it worry you unduly.
Don't worry about me, I'll be fine.
Don't worry the driver with unnecessary requests.
Don't worry too much about it.
I can't help worrying about the future.
She worries a lot about crime.
Stop worrying, Dad, we'll be fine.
We can't help worrying for your safety.
What really worries me is what we do if there's nobody there.
You do worry unnecessarily, you know.
He's worried himself sick about his daughter.
I worry that I won't get into college.
What worries me is how I'm going to get another job.
You worry too much.
Idioms: no worries!  not to worry

Derived: worry at something 

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

worry / ˈwʌr.i /   / ˈwɝː- / verb (PROBLEM)

A2 [ I ] to think about problems or unpleasant things that might happen in a way that makes you feel unhappy and frightened:

Try not to worry - there's nothing you can do to change the situation.

Don't worry, she'll be all right.

It's silly worrying about things which are outside your control.

[ + (that) ] She's worried (that) she might not be able to find another job.

B2 [ T ] to make someone feel unhappy and frightened because of problems or unpleasant things that might happen:

You worried your mother by not writing.

[ + that ] It worries me that he hasn't phoned yet.

The continued lack of rain is starting to worry people.

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

worry

[wʌ̱ri, AM wɜ͟ːri]

 worries, worrying, worried
 1) VERB If you worry, you keep thinking about problems that you have or about unpleasant things that might happen.
  Don't worry, your luggage will come on afterwards by taxi...
  [V about n/-ing] I worry about her constantly...
  [V about n/-ing] I work in a school so I don't have to worry about finding someone to look after my little boy...
  [V that] They worry that extremists might gain control.
 2) VERB If someone or something worries you, they make you anxious because you keep thinking about problems or unpleasant things that might be connected with them.
  [V n] I'm still in the early days of my recovery and that worries me...
  [V n] `Why didn't you tell us?' - `I didn't want to worry you.'...
  [V-ed] The English, worried by the growing power of Prince Henry, sent a raiding party to Scotland to kill him...
  [it V n that/to-inf] Does it worry you that the Americans are discussing this?
 3) VERB: oft with neg If someone or something does not worry you, you do not dislike them or you are not annoyed by them. [SPOKEN]
  [V n] The cold doesn't worry me...
  [it V n if] It wouldn't worry me if he came to my house, but I don't know if I would go out of my way to ask him.
  Syn:
  bother
 4) N-UNCOUNT Worry is the state or feeling of anxiety and unhappiness caused by the problems that you have or by thinking about unpleasant things that might happen.
  The admission shows the depth of worry among the Tories over the state of the economy...
  His last years were overshadowed by financial worry.
 5) N-COUNT A worry is a problem that you keep thinking about and that makes you unhappy.
  My main worry was that Madeleine Johnson would still be there...
  The worry is that the use of force could make life impossible for the UN peacekeepers...
  His wife Cheryl said she had no worries about his health.
 6) CONVENTION You say not to worry to someone to indicate that you are not upset or angry when something has gone wrong. [INFORMAL]
  `Not to worry, Baby,' he said, and kissed her tenderly.

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

1wor·ry /ˈwɚri/ verb -ries; -ried; -ry·ing
1 : to think about problems or fears : to feel or show fear and concern because you think that something bad has happened or could happen

[no obj]

• We didn't want you to worry.
• Don't worry. You'll be fine.
• Don't make your parents worry.
• When they didn't call after two hours, we began to worry.
• They were fine. We needn't have worried.
- often + about
• Let the travel agent worry about the details.
• Haven't we got enough to worry about?
• We don't have to worry about choosing a restaurant. [=someone else will choose a restaurant]
• The nurse said her condition was nothing to worry about. [=her condition was not serious]
• I'll take care of it. Don't worry about a thing.
- sometimes + over
• She worried over her husband's health.

[+ obj]

- + that
• Medical experts worry that a new strain of the virus will be more difficult to contain.
• We worry that children don't get enough exercise.
• My parents worry [=fear] that I won't go to college.
2 [+ obj] : to make (someone) anxious or upset : to cause (someone) to worry
• His poor health worries me.
• What's worrying you? [=what is causing you to feel upset?]
• It doesn't seem to worry him that rain is in the forecast.
• We didn't tell you about the accident because we didn't want to worry you.
Don't worry yourself. [=don't be upset or concerned]
• He worried himself sick [=he was extremely worried] before the exam.
not to worry informal
- used to say that there is no cause for concern or worry
• “It looks like we're almost out of milk.” “Not to worry. I'll get some more when I go to the store this afternoon.”
worry at [phrasal verb] worry at (something) chiefly Brit
1 : to pull, twist, or bite (something) repeatedly
• The dog was in the corner worrying at a bone.
2 : to try to solve (a problem) by thinking about it for a long time
• She kept worrying at the problem all day.

church

church [noun] (BUILDING)

a building for Christian religious activities

کلیسا

مثال: 

The town has four churches.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

church

 noun (plural churches)
a building where Christians go to speak to God (to pray):
They go to church every Sunday.

grammar
When we talk about going to a ceremony (a service) in a church we say in church, to church or at church without 'a' or 'the': Was Mr Poole at church today? We use a or the to talk about the building: the church where we got marrieda historic church.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

church

church S1 W1 /tʃɜːtʃ $ tʃɜːrtʃ/ noun
[Language: Old English; Origin: cirice, from Late Greek kyriakon, from Greek kyriakos 'of the lord', from kyrios 'lord, master']
1. [countable] a building where Christians go to worship ⇒ cathedral:
a short church service
church bells
2. [uncountable] the religious ceremonies in a church:
Mrs Dobson invited us to dinner after church.
My parents go to church every Sunday.
at church
We didn’t see you at church this morning.
3. [countable] (also Church) one of the separate groups within the Christian religion:
the Catholic Church
4. [singular, uncountable] the institution of the Christian religion, and all the priests and other ministers who are part of it:
the church’s attitude towards marriage
separation of church and state

COLLOCATIONS
ADJECTIVES/NOUN + church

the local church (=the one in a particular area, or near where you live) The local church dates from the 12th century.
a parish church British English (=the main Christian church in a particular area) This is the parish church for three villages near here.
a country/town church an attractive country church surrounded by trees
a (Roman) Catholic church I followed the crowds to the Roman Catholic church for Mass.

verbs

go to church (also attend church formal) (=go to a regular religious ceremony in a church) Do you go to church?
marry/get married in a church I’d like to get married in a church.

church + NOUN

a church service (=a religious ceremony in a church) There’s a church service at 10:30 every Sunday morning.
a church hall (=a large room in a church) The dance was held in the church hall.
church music church music for small choirs
church bells I could hear the church bells ringing.
a church tower I looked at the clock on the church tower.
a church spire/steeple (=a church tower with a pointed top) The tall church spires could be seen from far away.
the church choir (=a group of people who lead the singing in a church) Steve’s a member of the local church choir.
a church wedding (=in a church) She wants to have a church wedding.

THESAURUS (for Meaning 3)
religious group

church one of the different groups within the Christian religion – used especially in names: The Roman Catholic church is expanding. | members of the Church of England
denomination a religious group that has slightly different beliefs from other groups who belong to the same religion: Our staff come from churches of all denominations. | Several denominations have developed among Jews.
sect a religious group that has separated from a larger group: He is a leader in the powerful Ansar Sunni Muslim sect.
cult an extreme religious group that is not part of an established religion: Members of the cult all committed suicide on the same day.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

church

 

church [church churches churched churching]   [tʃɜːtʃ]    [tʃɜːrtʃ]  noun
1. countable a building where Christians go to worship
a church tower
• The procession moved into the church.

• church services

2. uncountable a service or services in a church
How often do you go to church?
(BrE) They're at church (= attending a church service).
(NAmE) They're in church.

• Church is at 9 o'clock.

3. Church countable a particular group of Christians
the Anglican Church
the Catholic Church
• the Free Churches

see also  denomination

4. (the) Church singular the ministers of the Christian religion; the institution of the Christian religion
The Church has a duty to condemn violence.
the conflict between Church and State
to go into the Church (= to become a Christian minister)
see a broad church at  broad  adj.  
Word Origin:
Old English cir(i)ce, cyr(i)ce, related to Dutch kerk and German Kirche, based on medieval Greek kurikon, from Greek kuriakon (dōma) ‘Lord's (house)’, from kurios ‘master or lord’. Compare with kirk.  
Culture:
churches and cathedrals
In Britain churches are landmarks in every town and village. Their tower or spire (= a cone-shaped structure on top of a small tower) can often be seen from far away. Churches are used for worship by the Church of England, Roman Catholics and other groups, while some Nonconformist Churches use chapels or halls. The church and church hall, a building used for meetings and Sunday School, were formerly the centre of the community. Now, far fewer people attend church and this has resulted in some churches being closed or used for other purposes such as housing.
Cathedrals may belong to either the Church of England or the Roman Catholic Church. Many cathedrals were built as part of a monastery, for example Durham was started in the 11th century by Benedictine monks. Some of these cathedrals are called minsters, e.g. York Minster, and they were originally centres for teaching Christianity. St Chad’s in Birmingham dates from the middle of the 19th century and was the first Roman Catholic cathedral built in England since the Reformation. A cathedral is the headquarters of a bishop or archbishop. Canterbury Cathedral is the headquarters of the Archbishop of Canterbury, who is head of the Church of England.
Many people visit churches and cathedrals to admire their architecture. In Britain churches are usually built of stone, with a tower or spire at the west end. Bells are placed high up in the tower and rung by long ropes before services. In villages the church is approached through a gate, sometimes a lychgate (= a gate with a roof over it), which leads into the churchyard where people are buried. The main entrance is usually on the south side. The church porch has a noticeboard and often a seat in it. Cathedrals are large churches, usually built in the shape of a long cross with a central tower. Older cathedrals are often in a quiet grassy cathedral close.
The earliest stone churches date from the Anglo-Saxon period (6th-11th centuries). Norman churches, from the 11th and 12th centuries, are massive structures. Rounded arches over doorways and windows are a distinctive feature of Norman architecture. Examples of Norman cathedrals are those at Durham and Ely.
The English Gothic style of the 13th-15th centuries is characterized by pointed arches and increasingly ornate designs for the vault. Windows were tall and narrow in the Early English period (13th century), and later, in the Decorated period, had tracery (= lace-like patterns) at the top. In the Perpendicular period (15th century), they were greatly increased in size and filled with stained glass (= small pieces of coloured glass in a lead frame) showing pictures of saints. Ceilings with elaborate fan vaults (= curved strips of stone spreading out from a point, with patterns between them) are supported by flying buttresses that lean at an angle from the wall and form an arch. Salisbury Cathedral is a characteristic Early English building. Exeter Cathedral dates mainly from the Decorated period and Gloucester Cathedral with its fan vaults is typical of the Perpendicular period.
Some later buildings, such as St Paul's Cathedral designed by Christopher Wren, are more like classical temples, with a central dome and spire added. Wren and James Gibbs, designer of St Martin-in-the-Fields, influenced architects in America: Christ Church in Philadelphia is a copy of St Martin. But the modern Coventry Cathedral, designed by Basil Spence in the 1950s, is a hall-like church with narrow stained-glass windows.
In the US the earliest churches were one-room buildings made of wood that were used also as schools. Most communities now have several churches in varying styles. Some are made of stone in order to look like old English churches, some are small, plain buildings made of brick or wood, and others are modern buildings with glass walls. Storefront churches are found in shopping streets and look like shops/stores. 
Collocations:
Religion
Being religious
believe in God/Christ/Allah/free will/predestination/heaven and hell/an afterlife/reincarnation
be/become a believer/an atheist/an agnostic/a Christian/Muslim/Hindu/Buddhist, etc.
convert to/practise/ (especially US) practice a religion/Buddhism/Catholicism/Christianity/Islam/Judaism, etc.
go to church/(NAmE) temple (= the synagogue)
go to the local church/mosque/synagogue/gurdwara
belong to a church/a religious community
join/enter the church/a convent/a monastery/a religious sect/the clergy/the priesthood
praise/worship/obey/serve/glorify God
Celebrations and ritual
attend/hold/conduct/lead a service
perform a ceremony/a rite/a ritual/a baptism/the Hajj/a mitzvah
carry out/perform a sacred/burial/funeral/fertility/purification rite
go on/make a pilgrimage
celebrate Christmas/Easter/Eid/Ramadan/Hanukkah/Passover/Diwali
observe/break the Sabbath/a fast/Ramadan
deliver/preach/hear a sermon
lead/address the congregation
say/recite a prayer/blessing
Religious texts and ideas
preach/proclaim/spread the word of God/the Gospel/the message of Islam
study/follow the dharma/the teachings of Buddha
read/study/understand/interpret scripture/the Bible/the Koran/the gospel/the Torah
be based on/derive from divine revelation
commit/consider sth heresy/sacrilege
Religious belief and experience
seek/find/gain enlightenment/wisdom
strengthen/lose your faith
keep/practise/practice/abandon the faith
save/purify/lose your soul
obey/follow/keep/break/violate a commandment/Islamic law/Jewish law
be/accept/do God's will
receive/experience divine grace
achieve/attain enlightenment/salvation/nirvana
undergo a conversion/rebirth/reincarnation
hear/answer a prayer
commit/confess/forgive a sin
do/perform penance 
Grammar Point:
school
When a school is being referred to as an institution, you do not need to use the: When do the children finish school? When you are talking about a particular building, the is used: I’ll meet you outside the school. Prison, jail, court, and church work in the same way: Her husband spent three years in prison.
note at college, hospital  
Example Bank:
Do you go to church?
He left the Church after a loss of faith.
He loves all the high church traditions— incense and processions and vestments.
He served the church for over sixty years.
He went into the Church when he was 23.
He went into the Church= became a priest when he was 23.
Linda joined the local Methodist church.
Mrs Parsons wasn't at church this Sunday.
She was actively involved in church groups.
The Catholic church teaches that life begins at conception.
The church is dedicated to St Paul.
The church was consecrated in 1250.
The early Church believed miracles were proof of who Jesus was.
There's an interesting organ in the church.
They're at church.
We decided not to get married in church.
a chamber concert at our local church
• a church youth group

• Church is at 9 o'clock.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

church / tʃɜːtʃ /   / tʃɝːtʃ / noun [ C ] (BUILDING)

A2 a building for Christian religious activities:

The town has four churches.

a church spire/tower

a church hall (= a building belonging to a church, with a large room for meetings)

 

church / tʃɜːtʃ /   / tʃɝːtʃ / noun (ORGANIZATION)

[ C or U ] an official Christian religious organization:

All the local churches were represented at the memorial service.

He went on a walking trip with some of his friends from church.

[ U ] an occasion when this organization meets as a group of people:

I'll see her after church.

They go to church every Sunday.

church services

the Church [ S ] Christian religious organizations:

Some people think the Church shouldn't interfere in politics.

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

church

[tʃɜ͟ː(r)tʃ]
 
 churches
 1) N-VAR A church is a building in which Christians worship. You usually refer to this place as church when you are talking about the time that people spend there.
  ...one of Britain's most historic churches.
  ...St Helen's Church...
  I didn't see you in church on Sunday.
 2) N-COUNT: usu with supp, oft adj N, N of n A Church is one of the groups of people within the Christian religion, for example Catholics or Methodists, that have their own beliefs, clergy, and forms of worship.
  ...co-operation with the Catholic Church...
  Church leaders said he was welcome to return.
  ...the separation of church and state.
 3) PHRASE: oft v-link PHR You can refer to an organization, group, or area of activity as a broad church when it includes a wide range of opinions, beliefs, or styles.
  The party has responded by trying to become a broad church that appeals to devout pensioners, Munich punks and aerospace engineers...
  It rapidly became apparent that rock'n'roll was a very broad church indeed.

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

church

church /ˈʧɚʧ/ noun, pl church·es
1 a [count] : a building that is used for Christian religious services
• This is the oldest church in town.
• They would like to be married in a church.
- often used before another noun
church bells/weddings/services
b [noncount] : religious services held in a church
• They go to church [=attend church services] every Sunday.
• I didn't see you at/in church last Sunday.
2 or Church [count] : a particular Christian group
• He is a member of the Catholic/Baptist/Anglican Church.
• What church do you belong to?
3 [noncount] : the Christian religion seen as an organization : the institution of the Christian religion
• the church's attitude toward divorce
• the separation of church and state

single

single [adjective] (NOT MARRIED)

not married, or not having a romantic relationship with someone

US /ˈsɪŋ.ɡəl/ 
UK /ˈsɪŋ.ɡəl/ 

مجرد

مثال: 

He's been single for so long now, I don't think he'll ever marry.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

 adjective

1 only one:
He gave her a single red rose.

2 a word that makes 'every' stronger:
You answered every single question correctly.

3 not married:
Are you married or single?

4 for one person:
I would like to book a single room, please.
a single bed
Look at double.

5 (British) for a journey to a place, but not back again:
How much is a single ticket to London, please?
Look at return.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

adjective

 

ONE
1. only before noun only one
He sent her a single red rose.
a single-sex school (= for boys only or for girls only)
All these jobs can now be done by one single machine.
I couldn't understand a single word she said!
the European single currency, the euro

(BrE) a single honours degree (= for which you study only one subject)  

 

FOR EMPHASIS

2. only before noun used to emphasize that you are referring to one particular person or thing on its own
• Unemployment is the single most important factor in the growing crime rates.

• We eat rice every single day.  

 

NOT MARRIED

3. (of a person) not married or having a romantic relationship with sb
The apartments are ideal for single people living alone.
• Are you still single?

see also  single parent  

 

FOR ONE PERSON

4. only before noun intended to be used by only one person
a single bed/room
a single sheet (= large enough for a single bed)

compare  double  adj. (3

 

TICKET

5. only before noun (BrE) (also one-way NAmE, BrE) a single ticket, etc. can be used for travelling to a place but not back again
a single ticket
How much is the single fare to Glasgow?
compare  return  n. (7)
see (in) Indian/single file at  file  n., at a (single) glance at  glance  n.  
Word Origin:
Middle English: via Old French from Latin singulus, related to simplus ‘simple’.  
Thesaurus:
single adj.
1. only before noun
What is the single most important factor here?
individualparticularspecificseparatedistinct
a/an single/individual/particular/specific/separate/distinct category/region
a single/particular/specific/separate event/incident/occasion
a single/particular/specific/distinct objective/purpose
2.
The apartments are ideal for single people living alone.
unmarrieddivorcedwidowedseparated|especially BrE, especially written lone
Opp: married
a single/unmarried/divorced/widowed/separated/lone man/woman/parent/mother/father  
Example Bank:
Marriage breakdown is common and there are a large number of single-parent families.
Unemployment is the single most important factor in the rising crime rates.
• We eat rice every single day.

Derived: single somebody out 

 

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

single / ˈsɪŋ.ɡl̩ / adjective (NOT MARRIED)

A2 not married, or not having a romantic relationship with someone:

a single woman/man/person

He's been single for so long now, I don't think he'll ever marry.

The number of single-parent families dependent on the state has risen enormously in recent years.

 

 

single / ˈsɪŋ.ɡl̩ / adjective [ before noun ] (ONE)

B2 one only:

He knocked his opponent down with a single blow.

Not a single person offered to help her.

You haven't been listening to a single word I've been saying.

→  Compare double adjective

 

single / ˈsɪŋ.ɡl̩ / adjective [ before noun ] (SEPARATE)

B1 considered on its own and separate from other things:

Patience is the single most important quality needed for this job.

She lost every single thing when her house burned down.

 

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

single

[sɪ̱ŋg(ə)l]
 
 singles, singling, singled
 1) ADJ: ADJ n (emphasis) You use single to emphasize that you are referring to one thing, and no more than one thing.
  A single shot rang out...
  Over six hundred people were wounded in a single day...
  She hadn't uttered a single word.
 2) ADJ: det ADJ (emphasis) You use single to indicate that you are considering something on its own and separately from other things like it.
  Every single house in town had been damaged...
  The Middle East is the world's single most important source of oil.
 3) ADJ Someone who is single is not married. You can also use single to describe someone who does not have a girlfriend or boyfriend.
  Is it difficult being a single mother?...
  I now have to face the rest of my life as a single person...
  Gay men are now eligible to become foster parents whether they are single or have partners.
 4) ADJ: usu ADJ n A single room is a room intended for one person to stay or live in.
  A single room at the Astir Hotel costs ₤56 a night.
 N-COUNT
 Single is also a noun. It's ₤65 for a single, ₤98 for a double and ₤120 for an entire suite.
 5) ADJ: ADJ n A single bed is wide enough for one person to sleep in.
 6) ADJ: usu ADJ n A single ticket is a ticket for a journey from one place to another but not back again. [BRIT]
  The price of a single ticket is thirty-nine pounds.
  Ant:
  return
 N-COUNT
 Single is also a noun. ...a Club Class single to Los Angeles. (in AM, use one-way)
 7) N-COUNT A single is a small record which has one short song on each side. You can also refer to the main song on a small record as a single.
  Kids today don't buy singles...
  The collection includes all the band's British and American hit singles.
 8) N-UNCOUNT Singles is a game of tennis or badminton in which one player plays another. The plural singles can be used to refer to one or more of these matches.
  Boris Becker of West Germany won the men's singles...
  She is equally at home on the singles or doubles court.
  Ant:
  doubles
 9) N-COUNT In cricket, a single is a hit from which one run is scored. In baseball, a single is a hit by which a batter reaches first base.
 10) → See also single-
 in single filesee file
  Phrasal Verbs:
  - single out

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

1sin·gle /ˈsɪŋgəl/ adj
1 always used before a noun : not having or including another : only one
• They lost by a single point. [=they lost by one point]
• A single shoe was found.
• It costs $10 for a single glass of wine!
• a single serving of carrots
• He earns $2,000 in a single week.
• There is a single [=uniform] standard for men and women.
- sometimes used to emphasize the largeness or importance of something
• The fingerprint turned out to be the single most important piece of evidence.
• Tobacco is the single greatest/largest/biggest industry in the state.
• Drunk driving is the greatest/largest/biggest single killer of high school students.
- sometimes used in negative statements to emphasize that there is a complete lack of something
• Not a single cookie was left.
• Not a single sound was heard.
• I could not hear a single word of what he said.
• We didn't get a single reply.
2 : not married or not having a serious romantic relationship with someone
• a club for single [=unattached, unmarried] people
• Are you single?
• a single parent/mother/father [=a mother or father who takes care of a child alone]
3
- used for emphasis after words like any, each, every, etc.
• He has more home runs than any other single player. [=than any other player]
• These laws apply to each single citizen.
• I drink milk every single day.
• She can't watch him every single minute.
4 always used before a noun : made for one person to use
• I stayed in a single room.
• I slept in a single bed. [=(US) twin bed]
5 Brit : one-way
• a single ticket
• How much is the single fare?

worst

worst [adjective]

superlative of bad adjective : of the lowest quality, or the most unpleasant, difficult, or severe:

US /wɝːst/ 
UK /wɜːst/ 

بدترین

مثال: 

That was the worst meal I've ever eaten.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

 adjective, adverb (bad, worse, worst)
the least pleasant or suitable; the least well:
He's the worst player in the team!
That was the worst day of my life.
Everyone played badly, but I played worst of all.
 opposite best

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

worst

I. worst1 /wɜːst $ wɜːrst/ BrE AmE adjective [the superlative of bad]
[Language: Old English; Origin: wierresta, wyrsta]
1. [only before noun] worse than anything or anyone else ⇨ best:
This is the worst recession for fifty years.
My worst fear was that we would run out of food.
What is the worst possible thing that can happen?
2. be your own worst enemy to cause a lot of problems for yourself because of your own behaviour
3. come off worst to lose a fight or argument

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

worst

worst [worst worsts worsted worsting] adjective, adverb, noun, verb   [wɜːst]    [wɜːrst] 

 

adjective (superlative of bad)
of the poorest quality or lowest standard; worse than any other person or thing of a similar kind
It was by far the worst speech he had ever made.
What's the worst thing that could happen?
What she said confirmed my worst fears (= proved they were right).  
Word Origin:
Old English wierresta, wyrresta (adjective), wierst, wyrst (adverb), of Germanic origin; related to worse.

Idioms: at worst  bring out the worst in somebody  come off worst  do your worst  get the worst of it  if the worst comes to the worst  worst of all worlds  your own worst enemy 

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

worst / wɜːst /   / wɝːst / adjective

A2 superlative of bad adjective : of the lowest quality, or the most unpleasant, difficult, or severe:

That was the worst meal I've ever eaten.

"It was the worst moment of my life," she admitted.

He is my worst enemy .

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

worst

[wɜ͟ː(r)st]
 1) Worst is the superlative of bad.
 2) Worst is the superlative of badly.
 3) N-SING: the N, oft N of n The worst is the most unpleasant or unfavourable thing that could happen or does happen.
  Though mine safety has much improved, miners' families still fear the worst...
  The country had come through the worst of the recession.
  Ant:
  best
 4) Worst is used to form the superlative of compound adjectives beginning with `bad' and `badly'. For example, the superlative of `badly-affected' is `worst-affected'.
 5) PHRASE: PHR with cl You say worst of all to indicate that what you are about to mention is the most unpleasant or has the most disadvantages out of all the things you are mentioning.
  The people most closely affected are the passengers who were injured and, worst of all, those who lost relatives.
 6) PHRASE: PHR with cl/group You use at worst or at the worst to indicate that you are mentioning the worst thing that might happen in a situation.
  At best Nella would be an invalid; at worst she would die...
  At the worst he would be there by the following night.
 7) PHRASE: n PHR, PHR after v, v-link PHR When someone is at their worst, they are as unpleasant, bad, or unsuccessful as it is possible for them to be.
  This was their mother at her worst. Her voice was strident, she was ready to be angry at anyone.
 8) PHRASE: V inflects, PHR with cl You use if the worst comes to the worst to say what you might do if a situation develops in the most unfavourable way possible. The form if worst comes to worst is also used, mainly in American English.
  If the worst comes to the worst I guess I can always ring Jean...
  He was asked whether he would walk out if the worst came to the worst.
 9) PHRASE: V inflects If someone does their worst, they do everything unpleasant that they can possibly do. You can say `do your worst' to show someone that you are not frightened of what they may do.
  I think it was dangerous to say: look, we've got an army now - do your worst.

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

1worst /ˈwɚst/ adj superlative form of 1bad
1 a : worse than all others
• This is the worst car I've ever bought.
• In my opinion, it's her worst book.
• It was the worst movie I've ever seen.
• His worst quality is his impatience.
• This has got to be the worst day of my life.
• The worst part of working there is the long commute.
• My worst fears came true.
• I am my own worst critic. [=I criticize my work more harshly than anyone else]
• He lives in the worst area of the city.
b : least skillful, talented, or successful
• He is the worst singer I've ever heard.
• They're the worst team ever.
2 : least appropriate, useful, or helpful
• That is the worst advice I've ever heard.
• I'm having the worst luck today.
• Leaving now is the worst thing you could do.
• He is the worst person to ask for advice.
• You've picked the worst time to come over.
• She called at the worst possible moment.
in the worst way US informal : very much
• I want a new bike in the worst way.
worst of all
- used to refer to the least pleasant or appealing part of something that has many bad parts
• I forgot my backpack, was late for class, and worst of all, I studied the wrong material for the test.
your own worst enemy
- see enemy

believe

believe [verb] (MEANING)

to think that something is true, correct, or real

US /bɪˈliːv/ 
UK /bɪˈliːv/ 

باور كردن‌، اعتقاد داشتن

مثال: 

She's arriving tomorrow, I believe.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

believe

 verb (believes, believing, believed )

1 to feel sure that something is true; to feel sure that what somebody says is true:
Long ago, people believed that the earth was flat.
She says she didn't take the money. Do you believe her?

2 to think that something is true or possible, although you are not certain:
'Does Mick still work here?' 'I believe so.'

believe in somebody or something to feel sure that somebody or something exists:
Do you believe in ghosts?

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

believe

believe S1 W1 /bəˈliːv, bɪˈliːv/ BrE AmE verb
[Word Family: noun: ↑belief, ↑disbelief, ↑believer; adjective: ↑believable ≠ ↑unbelievable, ↑disbelieving; verb: ↑believe ≠ ↑disbelieve; adverb: ↑unbelievably]
[Language: Old English; Origin: belefan, from lyfan, lefan 'to allow, believe']
1. [transitive not in progressive] to be sure that something is true or that someone is telling the truth:
You shouldn’t believe everything you read.
I believed him, even though his story sounded unlikely.
believe (that)
I don’t believe he’s only 25.
I don’t believe a word of it (=I think it is completely untrue).
2. [transitive not in progressive] to think that something is true or possible, although you are not completely sure
believe (that)
Detectives believe that the victim knew his killer.
it is believed (that)
It is believed that the house was built in 1735.
believe so (=think that something is true)
‘Have they arrived yet?’ ‘Yes, I believe so.’
be believed to be something
At 115, Mrs Jackson is believed to be the oldest person in the country.
The four men are widely believed (=believed by a lot of people) to have been killed by their captors.
Did you honestly believe that I’d be stupid enough to do that?
I firmly believe that the business will be a success.
3. it’s difficult/hard to believe (that) used when you are surprised that something is true:
Sometimes, it’s hard to believe we’ve been married for 50 years.
• • •
SPOKEN PHRASES
4. can’t/don’t believe something used when you are very surprised or shocked by something:
I can’t believe he’s expecting us to work on Sunday!
I couldn’t believe it when he told me what had happened.
can hardly/scarcely believe something
I could scarcely believe my luck.
5. believe it or not used when you are saying something that is true but surprising:
He enjoys school, believe it or not.
6. would you believe it! (also I don’t believe it!) used when you are surprised or angry about something:
And then he just walked out. Would you believe it!
7. believe (you) me used to emphasize that something is definitely true:
There’ll be trouble when they find out about this, believe you me!
8. you’d better believe it! used to emphasize that something is true
9. don’t you believe it! used to emphasize that something is definitely not true
10. can’t believe your eyes/ears used to say that someone is very surprised by something they see or hear
11. if you believe that, you’ll believe anything used to say that something is definitely not true, and that anyone who believes it must be stupid
12. seeing is believing (also I’ll believe it when I see it) used to say that you will only believe that something happens or exists when you actually see it
13. [intransitive] to have a religious faith:
She says those who believe will go to heaven.
make believe at ↑make1(19)
• • •
THESAURUS
■ to believe something
believe to be sure that something is true or that someone is telling the truth: I believed her when she said that she loved me. | Don’t believe anything he tells you.
accept to believe that something is true, especially because someone has persuaded you to believe it: His wife accepted his explanation for why he was late. | Leah had slowly come to accept her brother’s version of events.
take sb’s word for it especially spoken to believe what someone says is true, even though you have no proof or experience of it: I don’t know anything about him, so I’ll just have to take your word for it. | You don’t have to take my word for it – go and see for yourself. | ‘Cakes are very easy to make.’ ‘I’ll take your word for it.’
give somebody the benefit of the doubt to believe what someone says, even though you think it might not be true: Unless you have proof, you should give him the benefit of the doubt.
■ to believe something that is untrue
be taken in (also fall for something informal) to be tricked into believing something that is not true: A lot of people were taken in by these claims. | I can’t believe she fell for that old excuse!
swallow informal to believe a story or explanation that is not true, especially when this makes you seem silly: His aunt had swallowed his story unquestioningly. | Police refused to swallow his story, and put him in a cell.
believe in somebody/something phrasal verb
1. to be sure that someone or something exists:
Do you believe in God?
2. to think that something is effective or right:
I don’t believe in these diets.
believe in doing something
The school believes in letting children learn at their own pace.
3. to trust someone and be confident that they will be successful:
The people want a president they can believe in.
Believe in yourself, or you’ll never succeed.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

believe

 

be·lieve [believe believes believed believing]   [bɪˈliːv]    [bɪˈliːv]  verb

(not used in the progressive tenses

 

FEEL CERTAIN
1. transitive to feel certain that sth is true or that sb is telling you the truth
~ sb I don't believe you!
The man claimed to be a social worker and the old woman believed him.
Believe me, she's not right for you.
~ sth I believed his lies for years.
I find that hard to believe.
Don't believe a word of it (= don't believe any part of what sb is saying).
~ (that)… People used to believe (that) the earth was flat.
• He refused to believe (that) his son was involved in drugs.

I do believe you're right (= I think sth is true, even though it is surprising).  

 

 

THINK POSSIBLE

2. intransitive, transitive to think that sth is true or possible, although you are not completely certain
‘Where does she come from?’ ‘Spain, I believe.’
‘Does he still work there?’ ‘I believe so/not.’
~ (that)… Police believe (that) the man may be armed.
it is believed (that)… It is believed that the couple have left the country.
~ sb/sth to be, have, etc. sth The vases are believed to be worth over $20 000 each.

~ sb/sth + adj. Three sailors are missing, believed drowned.  

 

 

HAVE OPINION

3. transitive ~ (that)… to have the opinion that sth is right or true
• The party believes (that) education is the most important issue facing the government.

• She believes that killing animals for food or fur is completely immoral.  

 

 

BE SURPRISED/ANNOYED

4. transitive don't/can't ~ used to say that you are surprised or annoyed at sth
~ (that)… She couldn't believe (that) it was all happening again.
• I don't believe I'm doing this!

~ how, what, etc… I can't believe how much better I feel.  

 

 

RELIGION

5. intransitive to have a religious faith
The god appears only to those who believe.
more at give sb to believe/understand at  give  v.
Idioms: I don't believe it!  believe it or not  believe me  don't you believe it!  if you believe that, you'll believe anything  make believe  not believe your ears  seeing is believing  would you believe?  you better believe it!
Derived: believe in somebody  believe in something  believe something of somebody
Verb forms:

 
Word Origin:
late Old English belȳfan, belēfan, alteration of gelēfan, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch geloven and German glauben.  
Thesaurus:
believe verb
1. T, I
I don't believe you!
Do you believe in God?
trusthave confidence in sb/sthhave faith in sb/sth
Opp: doubt, (formal) Opp: disbelieve
believe/trust/have confidence/have faith in sb/sth
2. T
She believes that eating meat is wrong.
thinkfeelconsiderbe under the impression that…|especially BrE, informal reckon|formal hold
believe/think/feel/consider/be under the impression/reckon/hold that…
Believe or think? When you are talking about an idea of what is true or possible, use believe to talk about other people and think to talk about yourself
Police believe (that) the man may be armed.
I think this is their house, but I'm not sure.
Use believe to talk about matters of principle; use think to talk about practical matters or matters of personal taste
I believe we have a responsibility towards the less fortunate in society.
I think we should reserve seats in advance.
I don't think he's funny at all.
 
Language Bank:
according to
Reporting someone's opinion
Photography is, according to Vidal, the art form of untalented people.
For Vidal, photography is the art form of untalented people.
His view is that photography is not art but merely the mechanical reproduction of images.
Smith takes the view that photography is both an art and a science.
In Brown's view , photography should be treated as a legitimate art in its own right.
James is of the opinion that a good painter can always be a good photographer if he or she so decides.
Emerson believed that a photograph should only reflect what the human eye can see.
Language Banks at argue, opinion  
Language Bank:
opinion
Giving your personal opinion
In my opinion , everyone should have some understanding of science.
Everyone should, in my opinion , have some understanding of science.
It seems to me that many people in this country have a poor understanding of science.
This is, in my view , the result of a failure of the scientific community to get its message across.
Another reason why so many people have such a poor understanding of science is, I believe , the lack of adequate funding for science in schools.
Smith argues that science is separate from culture. My own view is that science belongs with literature, art, philosophy and religion as an integral part of our culture.
In this writer's opinion , the more the public know about science, the less they will fear and distrust it.
Synonyms at think
Language Banks at according to, argue, impersonal, nevertheless, perhaps  
Synonyms:
think
believe feel reckon be under the impression
These words all mean to have an idea that sth is true or possible or to have a particular opinion about sb/sth.
thinkto have an idea that sth is true or possible, although you are not completely certain; to have a particular opinion about sb/sth: Do you think (that) they'll come? Well, I like it. What do you think?
believeto have an idea that sth is true or possible, although you are not completely certain; to have a particular opinion about sb/sth: Police believe (that) the man may be armed.
think or believe?
When you are expressing an idea that you have or that sb has of what is true or possible, believe is more formal than think. It is used especially for talking about ideas that other people have; think is used more often for talking about your own ideas: Police believe… I think… When you are expressing an opinion, believe is stronger than think and is used especially for matters of principle; think is used more for practical matters or matters of personal taste.
feelto have a particular opinion about sth that has happened or about what you/sb ought to do: We all felt (that) we were unlucky to lose.
reckon(informal) to think that sth is true or possible: I reckon (that) I'm going to get that job.
be under the impression that…to have an idea that sth is true: I was under the impression that the work had already been completed.
to think/believe/feel/reckon/be under the impression that…
It is thought/believed/reckoned that…
to be thought/believed/felt/reckoned to be sth
to think/believe/feel sth about sb/sth
to sincerely/honestly/seriously/mistakenly think/believe/feel 
Synonyms:
trust
depend on sb/sth rely on sb/sth count on sb/sth believe in sb
These words all mean to believe that sb/sth will do what you hope or expect of them or that what they tell you is correct or true.
trustto believe that sb is good, honest, sincere, etc. and that they will do what you expect of them or do the right thing; to believe that sth is true or correct: You can trust me not to tell anyone. Don't trust what you read in the newspapers!
depend on/upon sb/sth(often used with can/cannot/could/could not) to trust sb/sth to do what you expect or want, to do the right thing, or to be true or correct: He was the sort of person you could depend on. Can you depend on her version of what happened?
rely on/upon sb/sth(used especially with can/cannot/could/could not and should/should not) to trust sb/sth to do what you expect or want, or to be honest, correct or good enough: Can I rely on you to keep this secret? You can't rely on any figures you get from them.
trust, depend or rely on/upon sb/sth?
You can trust a person but not a thing or system. You can trust sb's judgement or advice, but not their support. You can depend on sb's support, but not their judgement or advice. Rely on/upon sb/sth is used especially with you can/could or you should to give advice or a promise: I don't really rely on his judgement. ◊ You can't really rely on his judgement.
count on sb/sth(often used with can/cannot/could/could not) to be sure that sb will do what you need them to do, or that sth will happen as you want it to happen: I'm counting on you to help me. We can't count on the good weather lasting.
believe in sbto feel that you can trust sb and/or that they will be successful: They need a leader they can believe in.
to trust/depend on/rely on/count on sb/sth to do sth
to trust/believe in sb/sth
to trust/rely on sb's advice/judgement
to depend on/rely on/count on sb's support
to completely trust/depend on/rely on/believe in sb/sth 
Example Bank:
I couldn't believe what I was hearing.
I didn't believe a word of what he said.
I personally believe that it's important.
I'm inclined to believe you.
I've long believed that a good reputation is the most valuable asset you can have in business.
It's hard to believe that this campaign has been going on for ten years.
No one seriously believes that this war will happen.
Paul thinks he's happy, but his mother believes otherwise.
The ad led us to believe that all prices had been cut.
The boss gave me to believe that we would all get a pay rise.
We have reason to believe that the escaped prisoner may be hiding in this house.
‘Does he still work there?’ ‘I believe so/not.’
‘Where does she come from?’ ‘Spain, I believe.’
Believe me, she's not right for you.
Don't believe a word of it.
He refuses to believe his son was involved with drugs.
I believe that we have a responsibility towards the less fortunate in society.
I don't believe you!
I find that very hard to believe.
It was generally believed that evil spirits lived in the forest.
No one seriously believed that the war would happen.
People used to believe that the earth was flat.
Police believe…
She believes that killing animals for food or fur is completely immoral.
• The paintings are believed to be worth over $20 000 each.

• We believe (that) education is the most important issue facing the government.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

believe / bɪˈliːv / verb [ T ]

A2 to think that something is true, correct, or real:

Strangely, no one believed us when we told them we'd been visited by a creature from Mars.

[ + that ] He believes that all children are born with equal intelligence.

She's arriving tomorrow, I believe.

"Is she coming alone?" "We believe not/so (= we think she is not/is) ."

[ + obj + to infinitive ] I believe her to be the finest violinist in the world.

[ + obj + adj ] All the crew are missing, believed dead.

not believe a word of it to not believe that something is true:

He told me she was just a friend, but I don't believe a word of it!

believe it or not B1 ( also would you believe it? ) said when telling someone about something that is true, although it seems unlikely:

He's upstairs doing his homework, believe it or not.

if you believe that, you'll believe anything! informal something that you say to emphasize that something is obviously not true:

He said the car in front backed into him, and if you believe that, you'll believe anything!

make believe to pretend or imagine:

Let's make believe (that) we're pirates.

→  See also make-believe

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

believe

[bɪli͟ːv]
 
 believes, believing, believed

 1) VERB If you believe that something is true, you think that it is true, but you are not sure. [FORMAL]
  [V that] Experts believe that the coming drought will be extensive...
  [V that] I believe you have something of mine...
  [V that] The main problem, I believe, lies elsewhere...
  [V n to-inf] We believe them to be hidden here in this apartment...
  [V so/not] `You've never heard of him?' - `I don't believe so.' [Also V n adj]
  Syn:
  think
 2) VERB If you believe someone or if you believe what they say or write, you accept that they are telling the truth.
  [V n] He did not sound as if he believed her...
  [V n] Never believe anything a married man says about his wife...
  [V n] Don't believe what you read in the papers.
  Ant:
  disbelieve
 3) VERB If you believe in fairies, ghosts, or miracles, you are sure that they exist or happen. If you believe in a god, you are sure of the existence of that god.
  [V in n] I don't believe in ghosts...
  [V in n] Do you believe in magic? [Also V]
 4) VERB If you believe in a way of life or an idea, you are in favour of it because you think it is good or right.
  [V in n] He believed in marital fidelity.
  [V in n] ...decent candidates who believed in democracy.
 5) VERB If you believe in someone or what they are doing, you have confidence in them and think that they will be successful.
  [V in n] If you believe in yourself you can succeed.
 6) VERB: with brd-neg (feelings) Believe is used in expressions such as I can't believe how or it's hard to believe that in order to express surprise, for example because something bad has happened or something very difficult has been achieved.
  [V wh] Many officers I spoke to found it hard to believe what was happening around them...
  [V wh] I was a physical and emotional wreck - I still can't believe how I ever got any work done. [Also V that]
 7) PHRASE: V inflects, with brd-neg (emphasis) If you say that you cannot believe your eyes or cannot believe your ears, you are emphasizing that you are very surprised about something you have seen or heard.
  I could not believe my eyes. She was far more beautiful than I had imagined.
 8) PHRASE: PHR with cl (emphasis) You can use believe it or not to emphasize that what you have just said is surprising.
  That's normal, believe it or not.
 9) PHRASE: PHR with cl (emphasis) If you say would you believe it, you are emphasizing your surprise about something.
  And would you believe it, he's younger than me!
 10) PHRASE: PHR with cl (emphasis) You can use believe you me to emphasize that what you are saying is true.
  It's absolutely amazing, believe you me.

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

believe

be·lieve /bəˈliːv/ verb not used in progressive tenses -lieves; -lieved; -liev·ing
1 [+ obj]
a : to accept or regard (something) as true
• The scientists believed the reports.
• Many people seem to believe that theory, but I find it hard/difficult to believe.
• You shouldn't believe everything you read.
• I knew that he was a liar and so I didn't believe a word he said. [=I didn't believe anything he said]
• I did not want to believe (that) it could happen.
• He says he'll help us, but I don't believe what he says.
• They were tricked into believing that he was a doctor.
- opposite disbelieve
b : to accept the truth of what is said by (someone)
• He says he'll help us, but I don't believe him.
- opposite disbelieve
2 [+ obj] : to have (a specified opinion) : think
• I'm beginning to believe (that) this war will never end.
• I used to believe (that) I was the only one who felt that way but now I know (that) there are others like me.
• He clearly/firmly/honestly believes (that) it is possible. = He clearly/firmly/honestly believes it (to be) possible.
• He had reason to believe that they would accept his offer. = He had reason for believing that they would accept his offer.
• She was widely believed to be guilty. [=many people believed that she was guilty]
• We were led to believe it was true. [=we heard, saw, or read something that made us think it was true]
• “Has he accepted the job?” “I believe so.” = “So I believe.”
• “Has he accepted the job?” “I believe not.” = “I don't believe so.”
3 [no obj] : to regard the existence of God as a fact : to have religious beliefs
• She went to church because her family expected it, but she didn't really believe.
4 [no obj] : to have trust in the ability, worth, etc., of someone or something
• The team hasn't won a championship in many years, but their fans still believe. [=their fans still believe in them; their fans still believe that they will win]
5 informal
- used for emphasis in phrases that express certainty, surprise, annoyance, etc.
• “Do you think they can win?” “You/You'd better believe it!” [=yes, I definitely think so]
Believe me, he can really play the game. = Believe you me, he can really play the game.
I can't believe how ugly that dress is. [=what an ugly dress]
• You broke the window? I can't believe you guys! [=I'm annoyed and shocked by what you did] How could you do such a thing?
I can't believe [=I am amazed/surprised] that that terrible restaurant is still in business.
• That terrible restaurant is still in business, if you can believe it/that.
Can/Would you believe it?! That terrible restaurant is still in business.
You won't believe what I just heard! [=you will be very surprised by what I just heard]
You wouldn't believe how long it took us to get here. [=it took us a surprisingly long/short time to get here]
I don't believe it! I swept the floor 10 minutes ago, and it's already dirty again!
I could not believe my good fortune/luck.
• It's hard to believe that he's gone.
• His latest movie, believe it or not, is a romantic comedy about a group of lawyers. [=it is surprising but true that his latest movie is a romantic comedy about a group of lawyers]
• “I hear that their marriage is in trouble.” “Don't you believe it! [=that is completely untrue] They're the happiest couple I know!”
• “He says he's going to become a doctor.” “If you believe that, you'll believe anything!” [=it would be very foolish to believe that he is going to become a doctor]
• “He says he's going to become a doctor.” “I'll believe that when I see it!”
believe in [phrasal verb]
1 believe in (something)
a : to have faith or confidence in the existence of (something)
• Do you believe in ghosts?
b : to have trust in the goodness or value of (something)
• She believes in (the value of) regular exercise.
• They believed in liberty for all.
• I believe in working hard to achieve success.
• She doesn't believe in using pesticides. [=she doesn't believe that it's right to use pesticides; she believes that pesticides do more harm than good]
2 believe in (someone) : to have trust in the goodness or ability of (someone)
• Despite his problems, his parents still believe in him.
• She believes in herself and in her abilities.
can't believe your eyes/ears
✦If you can't believe your eyes/ears or can hardly/scarcely believe your eyes/ears, you are very surprised at or upset by what you are seeing or hearing.
• I could hardly believe my eyes when I saw what he was wearing.
make believe : to act as though something that is not true or real is true or real : pretend
• When we were children we used to make believe (that) we were soldiers fighting in a war.
• He isn't really angry, he's just making believe (that he is).
• They want to make believe that everything is all right.
- see also make-believe
seeing is believing
✦The expression seeing is believing means that when you actually see something, you have to believe that it exists or is true.
• I didn't think it could happen, but seeing is believing. [=I saw it happen, so now I believe it's possible]
- be·liev·able /bəˈliːvəbəl/ adj [more ~; most ~]
• The novel's ending is not very believable.
• His excuse was barely/scarcely believable.
- be·liev·ably /bəˈliːvəbli/ adv
• The characters are all believably portrayed.
- be·liev·er noun, pl -ers [count]
• a believer in religion
• devout believers
• She's a firm/great/strong believer in adult education. [=she firmly/strongly believes in the value of adult education; she thinks adult education is very useful and important]
• I was doubtful that he could run his own company, but he's made a believer out of me. = He's made me a believer. [=he's convinced me that he can run his own company]

difference

difference [noun] (NOT THE SAME)

the way in which two or more things which you are comparing are not the same

US /ˈdɪf.ɚ.əns/ 
UK /ˈdɪf.ər.əns/ 

تفاوت

مثال: 

What's the difference between an ape and a monkey?

Oxford Essential Dictionary

difference

 noun
the way that one thing is not the same as another thing:
What's the difference between this computer and that cheaper one?
What's the difference in price between these two bikes?
Sarah looks exactly like her sister – I can't tell the difference between them.

make a difference to change or have an effect on somebody or something:
Marriage made a big difference to her life.

make no difference, not make any difference to not change anything; to not be important:
It makes no difference to us if the baby is a girl or a boy.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

difference

difference S1 W1 /ˈdɪfərəns/ BrE AmE noun
[Word Family: verb: ↑differ, ↑differentiate; noun: ↑difference, ↑differentiation; adverb: ↑differently; adjective: ↑different]
1. [uncountable and countable] a way in which two or more people or things are not like each other OPP similarity
difference between
There’s a big difference between knowing that something is true, and being able to prove it.
There is very little difference between the parties on green issues.
Do children know the difference between right and wrong?
difference in
Researchers found a number of important differences in the way boys and girls learn.
There’s a world of difference (=there’s a very big difference) between being alone and being lonely.
2. [singular, uncountable] the amount by which one thing is greater or smaller than another
difference in age/size etc
There’s not much difference in price.
There’s a five-hour time difference between London and New York. ⇨ split the difference at ↑split1(9)
3. make a/the difference to have an important effect or influence on something or someone:
Whatever she did, it made no difference.
make a/the difference to
One more person wouldn’t make any difference to the arrangements.
make a/the difference between
It could make the difference between missing your train and getting to work on time.
Having a good teacher has made all the difference for Alex (=had an important influence).
4. it makes no difference to somebody used to say that it does not matter to someone which thing happens, is chosen etc:
Morning or afternoon. It makes no difference to me.
5. our/your/their differences disagreements:
We’ve had our differences in the past.
settle/resolve your differences (=agree not to argue any more)
6. difference of opinion a slight disagreement:
There have been some differences of opinion as to exactly how the money should be spent.
7. with a difference informal used to describe something which is interesting or unusual, especially in a good way:
an adventure holiday with a difference

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

difference

dif·fer·ence [difference differences]   [ˈdɪfrəns]    [ˈdɪfrəns]  noun
1. countable, uncountable ~ (between A and B) | ~ (in sth) the way in which two people or things are not like each other; the way in which sb/sth has changed
There are no significant differences between the education systems of the two countries.
He was studying the complex similarities and differences between humans and animals.
There's no difference in the results.
I can never tell the difference (= distinguish) between the twins
She noticed a marked difference in the children on her second visit.
There's a world of difference between liking someone and loving them.
What a difference! You look great with your hair like that.

Opp:  similarity

2. singular, uncountable ~ (in sth) (between A and B) the amount that sth is greater or smaller than sth else
There's not much difference in price between the two computers.
There's an age difference of six years between the boys (= one is six years older than the other).
I'll lend you £500 and you'll have to find the difference (= the rest of the money that you need).

• We measured the difference in temperature.

3. countable a disagreement between people
We have our differences, but she's still my sister.
Why don't you settle your differences and be friends again?
There was a difference of opinion over who had won.
more at bury your differences at  bury, sink your differences at  sink  v., split the difference at  split  v., a/the world of difference at  world
Idioms: make a/no/some difference  make all the difference  same difference  with a difference  
Word Origin:
Middle English: via Old French from Latin differentia ‘difference’, from different- ‘carrying away’, from the verb differre, from dis- ‘from, away’ + ferre ‘bring, carry’.  
Thesaurus:
difference noun C, U
There are significant differences between the two systems.
contrastvariationdistinction|formal disparityvariancedivergence|technical imbalance
Opp: similarity
a difference/contrast/variation/distinction/disparity/variance/divergence/imbalance between A and B
a difference/contrast/variation/disparity/variance/divergence/imbalance in sth
show a difference/contrast/variation/distinction/disparity/variance/divergence/imbalance
see/be aware of/look at a difference/contrast/variation/distinction 
Language Bank:
contrast
Highlighting differences
This survey highlights a number of differences in the way that teenage boys and girls in the UK spend their free time.
One of the main differences between the girls and the boys who took part in the research was the way in which they use the Internet.
Unlike the girls, who use the Internet mainly to keep in touch with friends, the boys questioned in this survey tend to use the Internet for playing computer games.
The girls differ from the boys in that they tend to spend more time keeping in touch with friends on the telephone or on social networking websites.
Compared to the boys, the girls spend much more time chatting to friends on the telephone.
On average the girls spend four hours a week chatting to friends on the phone. In contrast , very few of the boys spend more than five minutes a day talking to their friends in this way.
The boys prefer competitive sports and computer games, whereas / while the girls seem to enjoy more cooperative activities, such as shopping with friends.
When the girls go shopping, they mainly buy clothes and cosmetics. The boys, on the other hand , tend to purchase computer games or gadgets.
Language Banks at generally, illustrate, proportion, similarly, surprising  
Example Bank:
A small number of additional jobs can make a crucial difference to economic conditions.
Although the talks were generally successful, differences remain between the groups.
Can you spot the difference between these two photos?
Differences may arise when the young people do not have the same expectations as their parents.
He didn't have enough money, but his aunt agreed to make up the difference.
He sold the car for more than he'd paid and pocketed the difference.
He was very aware of his difference from the other children.
I found very little difference in price.
I noticed a real difference in his attitude.
I wanted to leave early and Ian wanted to leave late, so we split the difference and left at noon.
If you decide on the more expensive model, you can bring this one back and pay the difference.
If you want a holiday with a difference, come to Iceland.
It's difficult to tell the difference between butterflies and moths.
Just five minutes' exercise a day could make all the difference.
Like any married couple, we have our differences.
One tiny mistake when you're climbing could mean the difference between life and death.
Only an expert would know the difference between the male and the female.
Our different attitudes to life reflect the differences in our backgrounds.
She and Luke had a difference of opinion over how much money they should spend.
The difference in price is not very significant.
The difference lies in the way the fruit is prepared.
The difference with this information service is that it's free.
The differences in size arise from the amount of sunshine each plant gets.
The extra money will make a lot of difference to us.
The new central heating has made an enormous difference to the house.
The questionnaire showed vast differences in what kind of product people want.
The study explores the differences between the way girls and boys talk.
There are few important policy differences among the main parties.
There is a striking difference between eastern and western Europe.
There is one key difference with the earlier version of the software.
There were some differences as to how to deal with the crisis.
There's a big difference between reading about skiing and doing it yourself.
There's all the difference in the world between choosing to do something and being forced to do it.
There's not much difference between baseball and softball.
These talks aim to resolve the outstanding differences between the two sides.
They have had some minor differences, but in general they get on well together.
We found no significant difference between the two groups.
We should be focusing on what we have in common rather than emphasizing our differences.
We're going to get the two sides together to see if they can't settle their differences.
What difference does it make if he doesn't have a car?
What's the time difference between London and Tokyo?
a crucial difference of emphasis
I can never tell the difference between the twins.
I'll lend you £500 and you'll have to find the difference.
There's a world of difference between liking someone and loving them.
There's an age difference of six years between the two boys.
There's not much difference in price between the two computers.
We have our differences, but she's still my sister.
• What a difference! You look great with your hair like that

• Why don't you settle your differences and be friends again?

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

difference / ˈdɪf. ə r. ə ns /   / -ɚ- / noun (NOT THE SAME)

A2 [ C or U ] the way in which two or more things which you are comparing are not the same:

What's the difference between an ape and a monkey?

Is there any significant difference in quality between these two items?

make a (big) difference B2 ( also make all the difference ) to improve a situation (a lot):

Exercise can make a big difference to your state of health.

Putting up some new wallpaper has made all the difference to the place.

not make any difference B2 ( also not make the slightest difference ) to not change a situation in any way:

You can ask him again if you like, but it won't make any difference - he'll still say no.

It makes no difference wh ere you put the aerial, the TV picture's still lousy.

with a difference describes something unusual, and more interesting or better than other things of the same type:

Try new Cremetti - the ice cream with a difference.

Word partners for difference

know / tell the difference • a big / important / major / vast difference • a basic / fundamental difference • a marked / obvious difference • a slight / subtle difference • a difference in sth • a difference between [two things]

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

difference

[dɪ̱frəns]
 ♦♦
 differences

 1) N-COUNT: usu N prep The difference between two things is the way in which they are unlike each other.
  That is the fundamental difference between the two societies...
  There is no difference between the sexes.
  ...the vast difference in size...
  We do have social problems here. The difference is the people know each other and try to help each other.
 2) N-SING A difference between two quantities is the amount by which one quantity is less than the other.
  The difference is 8532.
 3) N-COUNT: usu pl, oft poss N If people have their differences about something, they disagree about it.
  The two communities are learning how to resolve their differences.
 4) PHRASE: V inflects If something makes a difference or makes a lot of difference, it affects you and helps you in what you are doing. If something makes no difference, it does not have any effect on what you are doing.
  Where you live can make such a difference to the way you feel...
  Exercise makes all the difference...
  It is sad to see him go but it won't make any difference to the way we conduct our affairs.
 5) PHRASE: V inflects If you split the difference with someone, you agree on an amount or price which is halfway between two suggested amounts or prices.
  Shall we split the difference and say $7,500?
 6) PHRASE: n PHR If you describe a job or holiday, for example, as a job with a difference or a holiday with a difference, you mean that the job or holiday is very interesting and unusual. [INFORMAL]
  When she starts work on Monday it will be in a job with a difference - she'll be her own boss.
  ...a politician with a difference.
 7) PHRASE: difference inflects If there is a difference of opinion between two or more people or groups, they disagree about something.
  Was there a difference of opinion over what to do with the Nobel Prize money?

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

difference

dif·fer·ence /ˈdɪfrəns/ noun, pl -enc·es
1 : the quality that makes one person or thing unlike another

[noncount]

• She knows the difference between right and wrong.
• There's no difference between the two houses. They look exactly the same.

[singular]

• There's a striking difference in the sisters' looks. [=they look very different from each other]
✦To tell the difference between two people or things is to see how they are unlike each other.
• It's hard to tell the difference [=distinguish] between one action movie and another.
• The new version is supposed to be much better than the old one, but I can't tell the difference (between them).
2 [count] : something that people do not agree about : a disagreement in opinion
• They've always had their differences. [=they have always disagreed about some things]
• The debate gave them a chance to air their differences. [=to discuss the things that they disagree about]
• We need to find a way to resolve/settle our differences. [=to stop disagreeing, arguing, etc.]
• There seems to be a difference of opinion [=people disagree] about what we should do next.
• They divorced because of irreconcilable differences. [=serious disagreements that they were not able to settle]
3 [count] : the degree or amount by which things differ
• There's a big difference in price.
• There's a 15-year age difference between her oldest and youngest children. [=her oldest child is fifteen years older than her youngest child]
make a difference
1 : to cause a change : to be important in some way
• Cost can make a difference in deciding on a college.
• “When would you like to leave?” “It makes no difference (to me).” [=it doesn't matter to me; I don't care]
• The weather didn't make any difference in our plans. [=didn't change our plans]
• It would make a lot of difference if you came.
• Your help made a big difference.
It makes very little difference. [=it matters very little]
• The size of the engine can make all the difference. [=can be very important; can matter most]
• It may not matter to you, but it makes all the difference in the world to me. = It makes a world of difference to me. [=it matters very much to me]
2 : to do something that is important : to do something that helps people or makes the world a better place
• She says that she got into politics because she wanted to make a difference.
same difference chiefly US informal
- used to say that two things are not really different in any important way
• “They lost 100 games last year.” “Actually, they only lost 96 games.” “Same difference. The point is, they were awful.”
split the difference
- see 1split
what's the difference?
1
- used to ask how one thing is different from another
• “I like this one a lot more than that one.” “Why? What's the difference (between them)?”
2 or what difference does it/that make?
- used to ask why something is important or to suggest that something is not important
What's the difference whether I go or not?
What difference does it make [=what does it matter] if I go with you?

pocket

pocket [noun] (BAG)

a small bag for carrying things in, made of cloth and sewn into the inside or onto the outside of a piece of clothing

US /ˈpɑː.kɪt/ 
UK /ˈpɒk.ɪt/ 

جیب، پاکت

مثال: 

He took some coins from/out of his pocket.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

pocket

 noun
the part of a piece of clothing that you can put things in:
I put the key in my pocket.

pick somebody's pocket to steal money from somebody's pocket or bag

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

pocket

I. pocket1 S2 W2 /ˈpɒkət, ˈpɒkɪt $ ˈpɑː-/ BrE AmE noun [countable]
[Date: 1400-1500; Language: Old North French; Origin: pokete, from poke 'bag']
1. IN CLOTHES a type of small bag in or on a coat, trousers etc that you can put money, keys etc in:
Luke came in with his hands in his pockets.
jacket/trouser etc pocket
The keys are in my trouser pocket.
pocket of
the inside pocket of his jacket
The policeman told me to turn out my pockets (=take everything out of them).
2. MONEY the amount of money that you have to spend:
There are eight hotels, with a price range to suit every pocket.
from/out of/into your own pocket
Dan had to pay for the repairs out of his own pocket.
He was accused of diverting some of the firm’s money into his own pocket.
The deepening recession has hit people’s pockets.
For investors with deep pockets (=a lot of money), the Berlin property market is attractive.
3. SMALL CONTAINER a small bag or piece of material fastened to something so that you can put things into it:
Please read the air safety card in the pocket of the seat in front.
4. SMALL AREA/AMOUNT a small area or amount of something that is different from what surrounds it
pocket of
In some parts, there are still pockets of violence and unrest.
pockets of air inside the hull of the ship
5. be in sb’s pocket to be controlled or strongly influenced by someone in authority, and willing to do whatever they want:
The judge was in the defense lawyer’s pocket.
6. have something in your pocket to be certain to win something such as a competition or an election:
The Democrats had the election in their pocket.
7. out of pocket especially British English informal if you are out of pocket, you have less money than you should have, especially as a result of making a mistake or being unlucky:
If he loses the deal, he’ll be badly out of pocket.
8. be/live in each other’s pockets British English informal if two people are in each other’s pockets, they are together too much
9.
GAME a small net on a ↑pool, ↑snooker, or ↑billiard table, which you try to hit balls into ⇨ ↑air pocket, ⇨ burn a hole in your pocket at ↑burn1(17), ⇨ line your own pockets at ↑line2(4), ⇨ pick sb’s pocket at ↑pick1(14)

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

pocket / ˈpɒk.ɪt /   / ˈpɑː.kɪt / noun [ C ] (BAG)

pocket

A2 a small bag for carrying things in, made of cloth and sewn into the inside or onto the outside of a piece of clothing:

a jacket/trouser/coat pocket

a hip/breast pocket

She thrust her hands deep in/into her pockets.

He took some coins from/out of his pocket.

B1 a container, usually made of cloth, that is sewn into or onto a bag or fixed to a seat or door in a vehicle:

Sarah put her maps in the outside pocket of her rucksack.

The safety instructions are in the pocket of the seat in front of you.

one of several holes around the edge of a billiard or snooker table, into which balls are hit C2 informal the amount of money that someone has for spending:

You need deep pockets (= a lot of money) if you're involved in a long law suit.

I paid for my ticket out of my own pocket (= with my own money) , but I can claim the cost of it back from my employer.

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

pocket

[pɒ̱kɪt]
 ♦♦♦
 pockets, pocketing, pocketed

 1) N-COUNT: oft poss N, n N A pocket is a kind of small bag which forms part of a piece of clothing, and which is used for carrying small things such as money or a handkerchief.
  He took his flashlight from his jacket pocket and switched it on...
  The man stood with his hands in his pockets.
 2) N-COUNT You can use pocket in a lot of different ways to refer to money that people have, get, or spend. For example, if someone gives or pays a lot of money, you can say that they dig deep into their pocket. If you approve of something because it is very cheap to buy, you can say that it suits people's pockets.
  When you come to choosing a dining table, it really is worth digging deep into your pocket for the best you can afford.
  ...ladies' fashions to suit all shapes, sizes and pockets...
  You would be buying a piece of history as well as a boat, if you put your hand in your pocket for this one...
  We don't believe that they have the economic reforms in place which would justify putting huge sums of Western money into their pockets.
 3) ADJ: ADJ n You use pocket to describe something that is small enough to fit into a pocket, often something that is a smaller version of a larger item.
  ...a pocket calculator.
  ...my pocket edition of the Oxford English Dictionary.
 4) N-COUNT: usu N of n A pocket of something is a small area where something is happening, or a small area which has a particular quality, and which is different from the other areas around it.
  Trapped in a pocket of air, they had only 40 minutes before the tide flooded the chamber...
  The newly established government controls the bulk of the city apart from a few pockets of resistance.
 5) VERB If someone who is in possession of something valuable such as a sum of money pockets it, they steal it or take it for themselves, even though it does not belong to them.
  [V n] Dishonest importers would be able to pocket the VAT collected from customers.
 6) VERB If you say that someone pockets something such as a prize or sum of money, you mean that they win or obtain it, often without needing to make much effort or in a way that seems unfair. [JOURNALISM]
  [V n] He pocketed more money from this tournament than in his entire three years as a professional.
 7) VERB If someone pockets something, they put it in their pocket, for example because they want to steal it or hide it.
  [V n] Anthony snatched his letters and pocketed them...
  [V n] He pocketed a wallet containing ₤40 cash from the bedside of a dead man.
 8) PHRASE: V inflects If you say that some money is burning a hole in someone's pocket, you mean that they want to spend it as soon as possible.
  It's Saturday, you're down the high street and you've got a few quid burning a hole in your pocket.
 9) PHRASE: usu v-link PHR (disapproval) If you say that someone is in someone else's pocket, you disapprove of the fact that the first person is willing to do whatever the second person tells them, for example out of weakness or in return for money.
  The board of directors must surely have been in Johnstone's pocket.
 10) PHRASE: V inflects (disapproval) If you say that someone is lining their own or someone else's pockets, you disapprove of them because they are making money dishonestly or unfairly.
  It is estimated that 5,000 bank staff could be lining their own pockets from customer accounts.
  ...a government that ignores the needs of the majority in order to line the pockets of the favoured few.
 11) PHRASE: v-link PHR, PHR after v If you are out of pocket, you have less money than you should have or than you intended, for example because you have spent too much or because of a mistake.
 → See also out-of-pocket
  They were well out of pocket - they had spent far more in Hollywood than he had earned...
  Statements with errors could still be going out, but customers who notify us will not be left out of pocket.
 12) PHRASE: V and N inflect If someone picks your pocket, they steal something from your pocket, usually without you noticing.
  They were more in danger of having their pockets picked than being shot at.

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

1pock·et /ˈpɑːkət/ noun, pl -ets [count]
1 : a usually small cloth bag that is sewn into a piece of clothing, a larger bag, etc., and that is open at the top or side so that you can put things into it
• He keeps his gloves in his coat pocket.
• She was standing there with her hands in her pockets.
• a hip/breast/shirt pocket
• I have a hole in my pocket.
• Her pocket was full of change/coins.
• The security guard asked us to empty our pockets. [=to take out everything in our pockets]
- see color picture 
2 : the amount of money that someone has available to spend
• We're looking for investors with pockets that are deep enough to pay for the project. [=investors with enough money to pay for the project]
• There are items in our store that suit every pocket. [=that everyone can afford to buy]
• The governor paid for the event out of his own pocket. [=with his own money rather than the state's money]
• The mayor diverted city funds into his own pockets. [=he took money that belonged to the city]
- see also deep pockets
3 : a small bag or container that is attached to something and used to hold things
• There are pockets on the back of each car seat.
• The tickets are in the zippered pocket on the front of the suitcase.
4 : a small area or group that is different from the larger area or group it is in or near - usually + of
• Military forces have encountered a few pockets of resistance.
5 pool and billiards : a bag or cup that you hit the ball into at the corner or side of a pool table or billiard table
• He knocked the ball into the corner/side pocket.
6 : air pocket
be/live in each other's pockets Brit informal : to be too close to someone or spend too much time with someone
in someone's pocket or in the pocket of someone disapproving : under someone's control or influence
• The judge in the case was in the senator's pocket. [=was controlled by the senator]
• researchers/scientists who are in the pocket of pharmaceutical companies
in your pocket informal
✦If you have something in your pocket, you are certain to win or get it.
• The interview went really well. I thought I had the job in my pocket.
• She knew that she had the game/match in her pocket. [=she knew she would win the game]
line your pockets
- see 3line
out of pocket chiefly Brit informal : having less money because of something that has happened
• The lawsuit has left company shareholders $30 million out of pocket.
- see also out-of-pocket
pick pockets
- see 1pick

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