B1 (متوسط)

dream

dream [noun] (HOPE)

Something that you want to happen very much but that is not very likely

US /driːm/ 
UK /driːm/ 

رویا

مثال: 

It's always been my dream to have flying lessons.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

noun

1 pictures or events which happen in your mind when you are asleep:
I had a dream about school last night.

word building
A bad or frightening dream is called a nightmare.

2 something nice that you hope for:
His dream was to give up his job and live in the country.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

dream

I. dream1 S2 W2 /driːm/ BrE AmE noun [countable]
[Word Family: adjective: dream, ↑dreamless, ↑dreamy; noun: ↑dream, ↑dreamer; verb: ↑dream; adverb: ↑dreamily]
[Language: Old English; Origin: dream 'noise, great happiness']
1. WHILE SLEEPING a series of thoughts, images, and feelings that you experience when you are asleep ⇨ daydream:
I had lots of dreams last night.
dream about
a dream about drowning
in a dream
In my dream I flew to a forest of enormous trees.
2. WISH a wish to do, be, or have something – used especially when this seems unlikely:
Her dream is to make a movie.
dream of (doing) something
She had dreams of university.
fulfil/realize a dream
I fulfilled a childhood dream when I became champion.
I have just met the man of my dreams (=the perfect man)!
beyond your wildest dreams (=better than anything you imagined or hoped for)
3. dream house/home/job etc something that seems perfect to someone:
I’ve finally found my dream house.
Win a dream holiday for two in San Francisco!
4. in a dream having a state of mind in which you do not notice or pay attention to things around you:
Ruth went about her tasks in a dream.
5. be a dream come true if something is a dream come true, it happens after you have wanted it to happen for a long time:
Marriage to her is a dream come true.
6. like a dream extremely well or effectively:
The plan worked like a dream.
7. be/live in a dream world to have ideas or hopes that are not correct or likely to happen:
If you think that all homeless people have it as easy as me, then you are living in a dream world.
8. be a dream be perfect or very desirable:
Her latest boyfriend is an absolute dream.
Some performers are a dream to work with; others are not.
sb’s dream (=something someone would really like)
She’s every adolescent schoolboy’s dream.
9. in your dreams spoken used to say in a rude way that something is not likely to happen:
‘I’m going to ask her to go out with me.’ ‘In your dreams!’
• • •
COLLOCATIONS (for Meaning 1)
■ verbs
have a dream I had a dream about you last night.
■ adjectives
a bad dream (=unpleasant or frightening) The movie gave the kids bad dreams.
a strange/weird dream Sometimes I have a strange dream in which I try to speak but I can’t.
a vivid dream (=very clear) In a vivid dream he saw a huge coloured bird flying above his head.
a recurrent/recurring dream (=that you have many times) Having recurrent dreams is a very common experience.
■ phrases
be/seem like a dream (=seem unreal) That summer was so wonderful it seemed like a dream.
Sweet dreams! (=said to someone who is going to bed) Good night, Sam! Sweet dreams!
• • •
COLLOCATIONS (for Meaning 2)
■ verbs
have a dream/dreams I had dreams of becoming a doctor.
achieve/fulfil/realize a dream (=do or get what you want) He had finally achieved his dream of winning an Olympic gold medal.
pursue/follow a dream (=try to do or get what you want) She left her home town to pursue her dreams.
dream a dream literary (=have a wish) We can dream great dreams for ourselves and others.
■ ADJECTIVES/NOUN + dream
big/great dreams (=a wish to achieve great things) She was a little girl with big dreams.
an impossible dream (=about something that cannot happen) Having a number one record had seemed an impossible dream.
a childhood dream (=that you had when you were a child) I had a childhood dream of becoming an astronaut.
a lifelong dream (=that you have had all your life) His lifelong dream had been to write a novel.
a distant dream (=that it will take a long time to achieve) Peace in this area may still be a distant dream.
■ phrases
a dream comes true (=something you want happens) I’d always wanted to go to Africa and at last my dream came true.
the man/woman/house etc of your dreams (=the perfect one for you) We can help you find the house of your dreams.
not/never in your wildest dreams (=used to say that you had never expected something to happen) Never in my wildest dreams did I think I would win the competition.
beyond your wildest dreams (=better or more than you ever hoped for) Suddenly he was wealthy beyond his wildest dreams.
• • •
THESAURUS
■ when you are sleeping
dream the thoughts, images, and feelings that go through your mind while you are asleep: I had a strange dream last night -- you and I were in some sort of forest.
nightmare a very unpleasant and frightening dream: She still has terrible nightmares about the accident.
daydream a series of pleasant thoughts that go through your mind when you are awake, so that you do not notice what is happening around you: Neil was in a daydream, and didn’t hear the teacher call his name.
reverie formal a state of imagining or thinking about pleasant things, that is like dreaming: The doorbell rang, shaking her from her reverie.
■ something that you want to do
dream something very special that you want to do and that you think about a lot, especially something that is not very likely to happen: As a teenager, his dream was to become a professional footballer.
ambition something that you want to achieve and that you work hard to achieve, especially in your work: My ambition had always been to start my own business.
aspirations the important things that people want from their lives – used especially about the things a society or a large group of people wants: It’s important that young people think seriously about their career aspirations.
fantasy something exciting that you imagine happening to you, which is extremely unlikely to happen and often involves sex: schoolboy fantasies
pipe dream a dream that is impossible or is extremely unlikely to happen: Is world peace no more than a pipe dream?

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

dream

dream [dream dreams dreamed dreamt dreaming] noun, verb   [driːm]    [driːm] 

noun
1. countable a series of images, events and feelings that happen in your mind while you are asleep
I had a vivid dream about my old school.
I thought someone came into the bedroom, but it was just a dream.
‘Goodnight. Sweet dreams.’
Don't think about it. You'll only give yourself bad dreams.
compare  nightmare 

see also  wet dream

2. countable a wish to have or be sth, especially one that seems difficult to achieve
Her lifelong dream was to be a famous writer.
He wanted to be rich but it was an impossible dream.
If I win, it will be a dream come true.
She tried to turn her dream of running her own business into reality.
a dream car/house/job, etc.
I've finally found the man of my dreams.
a chance to fulfil a childhood dream
• It was the end of all my hopes and dreams.

see also  pipe dream

3. singular a state of mind or a situation in which things do not seem real or part of normal life
She walked around in a dream all day.

see also  daydream

4. singular (informal) a beautiful or wonderful person or thing
That meal was an absolute dream.
more at beyond your wildest dreams at  wild  adj.  
Word Origin:
Middle English: of Germanic origin, related to Dutch droom and German Traum, and probably also to Old English drēam ‘joy, music’.  
Thesaurus:
dream noun C
1.
I had a vivid dream about my old school.
nightmarehallucination|especially written vision
a dream/nightmare about sth
have (a) dream/nightmare/hallucinations/vision
a dream/vision fades
2. C
Her lifelong dream was to be a famous writer.
ambitionhopeaspirationfantasyexpectation|especially written wishdesire
have (a/an) dream/ambition/aspirations/hopes/fantasy/expectations/wish/desire
harbour a/an dream/ambition/hope/fantasy/wish/desire
fulfil your dreams/ambitions/hopes/aspirations/fantasies/expectations/wishes/desires
abandon/give up a/an dream/ambition/hope
3. C
She wandered round the house in a dream.
daydreamdazetrancestupor|formal literary reverie
be in a dream/daydream/daze/trance/stupor/reverie
be lost in a dream/daydream/reverie 
Example Bank:
After Betty retired, she and her husband designed and built their dream house.
After Betty retired, she designed and built her dream house.
At last I feel I'm living the dream.
At last his dreams were fulfilled.
Born a poor boy in Kansas, he lived the American dream as a successful inventor.
He had a prophetic dream about a train crash the night before the disaster.
He left his job to pursue his dream of opening a restaurant.
He never abandoned his dream of finding his real mother.
He put all his efforts into making his dream of a united country come true.
He spent his life chasing pipe dreams= fantasies that are unlikely to come true.
Her biggest dream was to become a singer.
His plans to travel the world now seemed like a distant dream.
His waking dream was rudely interrupted by the telephone.
I had a very disturbing dream last night.
I hardly ever remember my dreams.
I hope my dream about prison won't come true!
I was awoken from my dream by a knock at the door.
Images of the crash still haunted his dreams years later.
In her dream, she was on board a ship heading for America.
Peace no longer seemed an impossible dream.
She confided in him all her hopes and dreams.
She fell asleep and dreamed strange dreams.
She found herself standing in front of the crowded hall and making her speech, as if in a dream.
She had this romantic dream of living in a windmill.
She is plagued by strange dreams.
She opened her eyes and the dream faded.
The government is living in a dream world if they think voters will agree to higher taxes.
The injury shattered her dream of running in the Olympics.
The victory keeps San Marino's dream of a World Cup place alive.
Their cruise in the Bahamas was a dream come true.
Their dream turned into a nightmare as the cruise ship began to sink.
They achieved a success beyond their wildest dreams.
a child frightened by a bad dream
a recurrent dream about being late for an exam
her lifelong dream of swimming with dolphins
the girl of his dreams
the great utopian dream that they have cherished for so long
the house of her dreams
their dream of a fairer world
vivid dreams that regularly haunted him
‘Good night. Sweet dreams.’
I've finally found the man of my dreams.
If I win it will be a dream come true.
If he thinks it's easy to get a job he's living in a dream world.
This is a chance to fulfil a childhood dream.
What would be your dream job?
Idioms: go like a dream  in your dreams  like a bad dream

Derived: dream on  dream something away  dream something up

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

dream / driːm / noun [ C ] (SLEEP)

A2 a series of events or images that happen in your mind when you are sleeping:

a good/bad dream

a recurring dream

I had a very odd dream about you last night.

[ + that ] Paul had a dream that he won the lottery.
 

dream / driːm / noun [ C ] (HOPE)

B1 something that you want to happen very much but that is not very likely:

It's always been my dream to have flying lessons.

Winning all that money was a dream come true .

of your dreams the best that you can imagine:

Win the house of your dreams in our fantastic competition!

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

dream

[dri͟ːm]
 ♦♦
 dreams, dreaming, dreamed, dreamt

 (American English uses the form dreamed as the past tense and past participle. British English uses either dreamed or dreamt.)
 1) N-COUNT A dream is an imaginary series of events that you experience in your mind while you are asleep.
  He had a dream about Claire...
  I had a dream that I was in an old study, surrounded by leather books.
 2) VERB When you dream, you experience imaginary events in your mind while you are asleep.
  [V that] Ivor dreamed that he was on a bus...
  [V about/of n] She dreamed about her baby. [Also V]
 3) N-COUNT: usu with supp You can refer to a situation or event as a dream if you often think about it because you would like it to happen.
  He had finally accomplished his dream of becoming a pilot...
  My dream is to have a house in the country...
  You can make that dream come true.
  Syn:
  ambition
 4) VERB If you often think about something that you would very much like to happen or have, you can say that you dream of it.
  [V of/about n/-ing] As a schoolgirl, she had dreamed of becoming an actress...
  [V of/about n/-ing] For most of us, a brand new designer kitchen is something we can only dream about...
  [V that] I dream that my son will attend college and find a good job.
 5) ADJ: ADJ n You can use dream to describe something that you think is ideal or perfect, especially if it is something that you thought you would never be able to have or experience.
  He had his dream house built on the banks of the river Bure.
  ...a dream holiday to Jamaica.
 6) N-SING: poss N If you describe something as a particular person's dream, you think that it would be ideal for that person and that he or she would like it very much.
  Greece is said to be a botanist's dream...
  He's every girl's dream!
 7) N-SING: a N If you say that something is a dream, you mean that it is wonderful. [INFORMAL]
 8) N-COUNT: usu sing, with supp You can refer to a situation or event that does not seem real as a dream, especially if it is very strange or unpleasant.
  When the right woman comes along, this bad dream will be over.
 9) VERB: with neg (emphasis) If you say that you would not dream of doing something, you are emphasizing that you would never do it because you think it is wrong or is not possible or suitable for you.
  [V of -ing/n] I wouldn't dream of making fun of you...
  [V of -ing/n] My sons would never dream of expecting their clothes to be ironed.
 10) VERB: with brd-neg (emphasis) If you say that you never dreamed that something would happen, you are emphasizing that you did not think that it would happen because it seemed very unlikely.
  [V that] I never dreamed that I would be able to afford a home here...
  [V of n] Who could ever dream of a disaster like this?...
  I find life more charming and more astonishing than I'd ever dreamed.
 11) → See also pipe dream, wet dream
 12) PHRASE If you tell someone to dream on, you mean that something they are hoping for is unlikely to happen.
  `Perhaps one day I may go on a relaxing holiday.' - `Yeah, dream on.'
 13) PHRASE: PHR after v, v-link PHR If you say that you are in a dream, you mean that you do not concentrate properly on what you are doing because you are thinking about other things.
  All day long I moved in a dream, my body performing its duties automatically.
 14) PHRASE: PHR after v If you say that someone does something like a dream, you think that they do it very well. If you say that something happens like a dream, you mean that it happens successfully without any problems.
  She cooked like a dream...
  His ship had sailed like a dream.
 15) PHRASE: n PHR If you describe someone or something as the person or thing of your dreams, you mean that you consider them to be ideal or perfect.
  This could be the man of my dreams.
 16) PHRASE: with brd-neg, PHR with cl (emphasis) If you say that you could not imagine a particular thing in your wildest dreams, you are emphasizing that you think it is extremely strange or unlikely.
  Never in my wildest dreams could I imagine there would be this kind of money in the game.
 17) PHRASE: n PHR, PHR after v, v-link PHR (emphasis) If you describe something as being beyond your wildest dreams, you are emphasizing that it is better than you could have imagined or hoped for.
  She had already achieved success beyond her wildest dreams.

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

1dream /ˈdriːm/ noun, pl dreams
1 [count] : a series of thoughts, visions, or feelings that happen during sleep
• He had a dream about climbing a mountain.
• You were in my dream last night.
• Scary movies always give me bad dreams. [=nightmares]
• “Good night, my love. Sweet dreams.” [=I hope you will sleep well and have pleasant dreams]
- see also wet dream
2 [count] : an idea or vision that is created in your imagination and that is not real
• She indulged in dreams [=fantasies] of living in a palace.
• I've found the man/woman of my dreams.
• They succeeded beyond their wildest dreams.
Never in my wildest dreams did I imagine it would be so much fun.
• If you think the work will be easy, you're living in a dream world.
3 a [count] : something that you have wanted very much to do, be, or have for a long time
• He has had a lifelong dream of becoming an actor.
• It's a dream of mine to own a house in the country.
• Tell me your hopes and dreams.
• She followed/fulfilled her dreams.
• Making it to the Olympics was a dream come true.
• Many believe that worldwide peace is an impossible dream.
- see also american dream, pipe dream
b [singular] : someone or something that has the qualities that a person wants most
• The meal was a garlic lover's dream.
• He's every woman's dream.
- usually used before another noun
• She's still trying to find her dream husband.
• Managing a professional baseball team is his dream job.
• They just moved into their dream home.
- see also dream team
4 [singular] informal : something that is beautiful, excellent, or pleasing
• It's a dream of a house.
• The new car is a dream to drive. = The new car drives like a dream.
• My new computer works like a dream. [=works very well]
5 [singular] : a state or condition in which you are not thinking about or aware of the real things that are around you
• He was walking around in a dream.
in your dreams informal
- used to say that you do not think something that another person wants or expects will ever happen
• “Maybe my parents will lend me the car tonight.” “In your dreams.”

 

fear

fear [noun]

An unpleasant emotion or thought that you have when you are frightened or worried by something dangerous, painful, or bad that is happening or might happen

US /fɪr/ 
UK /fɪər/ 

ترس‌، هراس‌

مثال: 

I have a fear of heights.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

noun
the feeling that you have when you think that something bad might happen:
I have a terrible fear of dogs.
He was shaking with fear.
My fears for his safety were unnecessary.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

fear

I. fear1 S3 W1 /fɪə $ fɪr/ BrE AmE noun
[Word Family: noun: ↑fear, ↑fearfulness ≠ ↑fearlessness; adjective: ↑fearful ≠ ↑fearless, ↑fearsome; verb: ↑fear; adverb: ↑fearfully ≠ ↑fearlessly]
[Language: Old English; Origin: fær 'sudden danger']
1. [uncountable and countable] the feeling you get when you are afraid or worried that something bad is going to happen
fear of
a fear of flying
fear that
There are fears that share prices could decrease still further.
fear for
The girl’s parents expressed fears for her safety.
in fear
The children looked at her in fear.
without fear
People must be able to express their views without fear of criticism.
2. for fear (that), for fear of something because you are worried that you will make something happen:
She finally ran away for fear that he would kill her.
for fear of doing something
He got to the station early, for fear of missing her.
3. no fear! British English informal used humorously to say that you are definitely not going to do something:
‘Are you going to Bill’s party tonight?’ ‘No fear!’
4. [uncountable] the possibility or danger that something bad might happen:
There’s no fear of revolt now.
5. put the fear of God into somebody informal to make someone feel that they must do something, by making sure they know what will happen if they do not do it:
The Italian manager must have put the fear of God into his team.
6. without fear or favour British English formal in a fair way:
The law must be enforced without fear or favour.
• • •
COLLOCATIONS
■ adjectives
sb’s worst/greatest fear Her worst fear was never seeing her children again.
an irrational fear (=one that is not reasonable) He grew up with an irrational fear of insects.
a deep-seated fear (=very strong and difficult to change) He exploited people’s deep-seated fears about strangers.
groundless (=without any reason) As it turned out, these fears were groundless.
■ verbs
conquer/overcome your fear (=stop being afraid) She managed to conquer her fear of flying.
shake/tremble with fear He was shaking with fear after being held at gunpoint.
show fear She was determined not to show fear.
be gripped by fear (=be very afraid) We were gripped by fear as the boat was tossed around by the waves.
be paralysed with fear (=be so afraid that you cannot move) Bruce was paralysed with fear when he saw the snake.
confirm sb’s fears (=show that what you were afraid of has actually happened) The look on Colin’s face confirmed all my worst fears.
ease/allay/dispel sb’s fears (=help someone stop being afraid) Frank eased my fears about not being able to speak the local language.
■ phrases
be in fear of/for your life (=be afraid that you may be killed) Celia was in fear of her life when she saw the truck coming toward her.
be full of fear The residents are too full of fear to leave their houses.
be/live in fear of something (=be always afraid of something) They were constantly in fear of an enemy attack.
have no fear of something He had no fear of death.
sb’s hopes and fears We each had different hopes and fears about the trip.
■ COMMON ERRORS
► Do not say that someone 'has fear'. Say that someone is frightened or is afraid.
• • •
THESAURUS
fear a feeling of being frightened: He was trembling with fear. | Fear of failure should not stop you trying.
terror a feeling of great fear, because you think that something terrible is about to happen: She let out a scream of pure terror.
fright a sudden feeling of fear, or a situation that makes you feel this: My body was shaking with fright. | You gave me a fright! | He’s had a bit of fright, that’s all.
panic a sudden feeling of fear or nervousness that makes you unable to think clearly or behave sensibly: She was in such a panic that she hardly knew what she was doing! | There were scenes of sheer panic immediately following the bomb blast.
alarm a feeling of fear or worry which shows in your voice or behaviour, because you think something bad might happen: When I mentioned her name, he looked up at me in alarm. | The streets were calm and there was no sign of alarm.
foreboding /fɔːˈbəʊdɪŋ $ fɔːrˈboʊ-/ a feeling that something bad or unpleasant might happen although there is no obvious reason why it should: She felt the same sense of foreboding she had before her father died.
phobia /ˈfəʊbiə $ ˈfoʊ-/ a permanent strong unreasonable fear of something: I had a phobia about going to the dentist.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

fear

fear [fear fears feared fearing] noun, verb   [fɪə(r)]    [fɪr]

noun uncountable, countable
the bad feeling that you have when you are in danger, when sth bad might happen, or when a particular thing frightens you
Her eyes showed no fear.
The child was shaking with fear.
~ (of sb/sth) (a) fear of the dark/spiders/flying, etc.
We lived in constant fear of losing our jobs.
~ (for sb/sth) her fears for her son's safety
Alan spoke of his fears for the future.
~ (that…) the fear that he had cancer
The doctor's report confirmed our worst fears.
more at fools rush in (where angels fear to tread) at  fool  n., strike fear etc. into sb/sb's heart at  strike  v.  
Word Origin:
Old English fǣr ‘calamity, danger’, fǣran ‘frighten’, also ‘revere’, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch gevaar and German Gefahr ‘danger’.  
Thesaurus:
fear noun U, C
The child was shaking with fear.
frightdreadterroralarmpanicphobia
Opp: hope
a fear/dread/terror of sth
in fear/fright/dread/terror/alarm/panic
be filled with fear/dread/terror/alarm/panic
Fear or fright? Fright is a reaction to sth that is happening or has just happened. Use fear to talk about things that always frighten you and things that may happen in the future.:
She cried out in fear/fright.
I have a fear of spiders.
 ¤ I have a fright of spiders.  
Synonyms:
fear
terror panic alarm fright
These are all words for the bad feeling you have when you are afraid.
fearthe bad feeling that you have when you are in danger, when sth bad might happen, or when a particular thing frightens you: (a) fear of flying She showed no fear.
terrora feeling of extreme fear: Her eyes were wild with terror.
panica sudden feeling of great fear that cannot be controlled and prevents you from thinking clearly: I had a sudden moment of panic.
alarmfear or worry that sb feels when sth dangerous or unpleasant might happen: The doctor said there was no cause for alarm .
frighta feeling of fear, usually sudden: She cried out in fright.
fear or fright?
Fright is a reaction to sth that has just happened or is happening now. Use fear, but not fright, to talk about things that always frighten you and things that may happen in the future: I have a fright of spiders. ◊ his fright of what might happen
a fear/terror of sth
in fear/terror/panic/alarm/fright
fear/terror/panic/alarm that…
to be filled with fear/terror/panic/alarm
a feeling of fear/terror/panic/alarm 
Example Bank:
Doctors have voiced fears that we may be facing an epidemic.
Fears are growing of a new oil embargo.
He lied out of fear.
He ran away in fear.
His face was white with fear.
It was the first time she had experienced real fear.
My biggest fear was that my children would get sick.
My worst fears were confirmed.
Nobody refused for fear of being fired.
Nobody refused for fear of losing their job.
Our fears proved unfounded.
Public fears about the disease increased.
She did not know why she should feel such fear.
She managed to overcome her fear.
She stared at him without fear.
The boy showed no fear.
The government is anxious to allay the public's fears.
The men hesitated in fear of whatever was to come next.
The men set off in fear and trepidation.
The people live in fear of attack by the bandits.
The pupils obeyed through fear of punishment.
The sound of gunfire struck fear into the hearts of the villagers.
They have a terrible fear of failure.
This incident has fuelled fears of a full-scale war.
This stoked fears of financial difficulties.
When she heard the news, some of her fear subsided.
his fear about what might happen
my fear for her safety
new fears over terrorism
the constant fear of discovery
the fear that her mother had instilled in her
the girl's childhood fear of being eaten by monsters
the most primal fear, that of death
(a) fear of the dark/spiders/flying
He spoke of his fears for the future.
I had to run away for fear that he might one day kill me.
The child was shaking with fear.
The doctor's report confirmed our worst fears.
Idioms: for fear of of doing something  for fear …  in fear of your life  no fear  put the fear of God into somebody  without fear or favour

Derived: fear for somebody 

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

fear / fɪə r /   / fɪr / noun [ C or U ]

B1 an unpleasant emotion or thought that you have when you are frightened or worried by something dangerous, painful, or bad that is happening or might happen:

Trembling with fear, she handed over the money to the gunman.

Even when the waves grew big, the boy showed no (signs of) fear.

I have a fear of heights.

The low profit figures simply confirmed my worst fears.

[ + that ] There are fears that the disease will spread to other countries.

be in fear of your life to be frightened that you might be killed:

Lakisha sat inside, in fear of her life, until the police came.

be no fear of sth informal to be no possibility that a particular thing will happen:

Malcolm knows the city well, so there's no fear of us getting lost (= we will not get lost) .

for fear that/of sth C2 because you are worried that a particular thing might happen:

They wouldn't let their cat outside for fear (that) it would get run over.

I didn't want to move for fear of wak ing her up.

Word partners for fear noun

cause / fuel / raise / spark fears • express / voice your fears • allay / calm / ease (sb's) fears • heighten fears • overcome a fear • fears are growing / mounting • sth holds no fear for sb • sb's biggest / greatest / worst fear • fear of sth

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

fear

[fɪ͟ə(r)]
 
 fears, fearing, feared

 1) N-VAR: oft N of n/-ing Fear is the unpleasant feeling you have when you think that you are in danger.
  I was sitting on the floor shivering with fear because a bullet had been fired through a window.
  ...boyhood memories of sickness and fear of the dark...
  London Zoo is running hypnosis programmes to help people overcome their fear of spiders.
  Syn:
  terror, dread
 2) VERB If you fear someone or something, you are frightened because you think that they will harm you.
  [V n] It seems to me that if people fear you they respect you.
  Syn:
  be afraid of
 3) N-VAR: with supp, oft N of n/-ing, N that A fear is a thought that something unpleasant might happen or might have happened.
  These youngsters are motivated not by a desire to achieve, but by fear of failure...
  Then one day his worst fears were confirmed...
  His fears might be groundless.
  ...the fear that once a war began it would soon pass beyond the ability of either side to manage it.
 4) VERB If you fear something unpleasant or undesirable, you are worried that it might happen or might have happened.
  [V that] She had feared she was going down with pneumonia or bronchitis...
  [V n] More than two million refugees have fled the area, fearing attack by loyalist forces.
 5) N-VAR: oft N that, N of n/-ing If you say that there is a fear that something unpleasant or undesirable will happen, you mean that you think it is possible or likely.
  There was no fear that anything would be misunderstood...
  There is a fear that the freeze on bank accounts could prove a lasting deterrent to investors.
  Syn:
  risk, chance
 6) VERB If you fear for someone or something, you are very worried because you think that they might be in danger.
  [V for n] Carla fears for her son...
  [V for n] He fled on Friday, saying he feared for his life.
 7) N-VAR: N for n If you have fears for someone or something, you are very worried because you think that they might be in danger.
  He also spoke of his fears for the future of his country's culture.
  ...fear for her own safety.
 8) VERB If you fear to do something, you are afraid to do it or you do not wish to do it.
  [V to-inf] She pursed her lips together, as though fearing to betray her news...
  [V to-inf] Old people fear to leave their homes.
  Syn:
  be afraid
 9) VERB You say that you fear that a situation is the case when the situation is unpleasant or undesirable, and when you want to express sympathy, sorrow, or regret about it. [FORMAL]
  [V that] I fear that a land war now looks very probable...
  [V so/not] `Is anything left at all?' - `I fear not.'
  Syn:
  regret
 10) PHRASE: PHR n/-ing, usu v-link PHR, PHR after v If you are in fear of doing or experiencing something unpleasant or undesirable, you are very worried that you might have to do it or experience it.
  The elderly live in fear of assault and murder.
 11) PHRASE: PHR n/-ing, PHR with cl If you take a particular course of action for fear of something, you take the action in order to prevent that thing happening.
  She was afraid to say anything to them for fear of hurting their feelings...
  No one dared shoot for fear of hitting Pete.
 12) PHRASE: usu PHR with cl You say `fear not' or `never fear' to someone when you are telling them not to worry or be frightened. [OLD-FASHIONED]
  Fear not, Darlene will protect me...
  You'll get the right training, never fear.
  Syn:
  don't worry
 13) CONVENTION (emphasis) You use `no fear' to emphasize that you do not want to do something. [BRIT, INFORMAL]
  When I asked him if he wanted to change his mind, William said `No fear.'
  Syn:
  not likely
 14) PHRASE: V inflects If someone or something puts the fear of God into you, they frighten or worry you, often deliberately.
  At some time or other Eve had obviously put the fear of God into her.

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

1fear /ˈfiɚ/ noun, pl fears
1 : an unpleasant emotion caused by being aware of danger : a feeling of being afraid

[noncount]

• He was trembling with fear.
• an old story that still has the power to inspire fear [=to make people feel afraid]
• unable to walk the streets without fear of being mugged
• They regarded their enemies with fear and hatred/loathing.
• I've been trying to overcome my fear of flying.
• He won't say anything for fear of losing his job. [=because he is afraid of losing his job]
• She lived in fear of being caught. = She lived in fear that she would be caught. [=she was always afraid that she would be caught]
• They lived in (constant) fear of air raids during the war.
• an accident that struck fear into the hearts of [=frightened] skiers everywhere

[count]

• The doctor's diagnosis confirmed our worst fears.
• The government is trying to allay/alleviate/ease fears of a recession.
• Employees expressed fears that the company would go out of business.
• He told us about all his hopes and fears.
• She has a morbid fear of cats.
✦If you are in fear of your life or (US) in fear for your life, you are afraid of being killed.
• She claimed that she shot the burglar because she was in fear for her life.
2 [noncount] : a feeling of respect and wonder for something very powerful
fear of God
✦To put the fear of God into someone is to frighten someone very badly.
• The bad economic news has put the fear of God into investors.
no fear Brit informal
- used in speech to say that there is no reason to be afraid or worried
• “Are you going to tell her the truth?” “No fear [=never fear, fear not], mate: she won't hear a thing from me!” synonyms fear, dread, alarm, and fright mean painful emotion felt because of danger. fear is the most general word and suggests a continuing emotional state.
• people living in fear of violent crimes dread suggests a strong feeling of not wanting to accept or deal with something bad or unpleasant.
• the dread felt by people awaiting bad news alarm may suggest a strong emotion caused by an unexpected or immediate danger.
• They view the worsening food shortage with alarm. fright suggests a feeling caused by something unexpected and often suggests a brief emotion.
• The creaking door gave them a fright.

choice

choice [noun] (ACT)

An act or the possibility of choosing

US /tʃɔɪs/ 
UK /tʃɔɪs/ 

گزينش‌، انتخاب‌

مثال: 

If the product doesn't work, you are given the choice of a refund or a replacement.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

choice

 noun

1 (plural choices) the act of between two or more people or things:
You made the right choice.

3 (no plural) the right or chance to choose:
We have no choice. We have to leave.

3 (plural choices) the things that you can choose from:
The cinema has a choice of six different films.

 

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

choice

I. choice1 S1 W1 /tʃɔɪs/ BrE AmE noun
[Date: 1200-1300; Language: Old French; Origin: chois, from choisir 'to choose']
1. [uncountable and countable] if you have a choice, you can choose between several things ⇨ choose
choice between
Voters have a choice between three main political parties.
choice of
You have a choice of hotel or self-catering accommodation.
He has to make some important choices.
They gave us no choice in the matter.
2. [singular, uncountable] the range of people or things that you can choose from:
It was a small shop and there wasn’t much choice.
choice of
There is a choice of four different colours.
We offer a wide choice of wines and beers.
Consumers these days are spoilt for choice British English (=have a lot of things to choose from).
3. [countable] the person or thing that someone chooses
choice of
I don’t really like her choice of jewellery.
I think London was a good choice as a venue.
sb’s first/second choice
My first choice of college was Stanford.
4. by choice if you do something by choice, you do it because you want to do it and not because you are forced to do it:
She lives alone by choice.
5. the something of your choice the person or thing of your choice is the one that you would most like to choose:
My children cannot go to the school of their choice.
6. the something of choice the thing of choice is the one that people prefer to use:
It is the drug of choice for this type of illness.
⇨ HOBSON’S CHOICE
• • •
COLLOCATIONS
■ verbs
have a choice Students have a choice between German and Spanish.
make a choice (=choose something) One of our course advisors can help you to make your choice.
give somebody a choice Her doctor gave her a choice: take medicine or lose weight.
be faced with a choice He was faced with a difficult choice.
have no choice (but to do something) The men had no choice but to obey.
leave somebody with no choice I was left with no choice but to resign.
exercise your choice formal (=make a choice - used especially when talking about someone using their right to choose) Everyone should have the right to exercise choice in matters of relationships.
■ ADJECTIVES/NOUN + choice
the right/wrong choice I think you’ve made the right choice.
a difficult choice It was a very difficult choice for me.
a stark choice (=a choice between two unpleasant things that you must make) We faced a stark choice: steal or starve.
(a) free choice Students have an entirely free choice of what to study at university.
an informed choice (=a choice based on knowledge of the facts about something) The patient should have enough information to make an informed choice.
consumer choice (=the opportunity for people to choose between different products) I believe in free trade and consumer choice.
parental choice The aim is to extend parental choice in education.
■ phrases
freedom of choice Patients should have more freedom of choice.
given the choice (=if you had a choice) Given the choice, I probably wouldn’t work.
have no choice in the matter The village people had no choice in the matter.
• • •
THESAURUS
choice: choice of: The school seems OK, but there isn’t a great choice of courses. | have a choice (=be able to choose from several things): With her high grades and athletic skill, Celeste had her choice of colleges. | have no choice but to do something (=to be forced to do something because there is nothing else you can choose): Spooner says he had no choice but to file for bankruptcy. | wide choice (=a lot of things to choose from): There is a wide choice of hotels and hostels in the town.
option one of the things that you can choose to do in a particular situation: He basically has two options: he can have the surgery, or he can give up playing football. | keep/leave your options open (=delay choosing so that you continue to have several things to choose from): I haven’t signed any contracts yet – I want to keep my options open.
alternative one of two or more ways of doing something: Did you consider other alternatives before you moved in with Lucy? | alternative to: There is no practical alternative to our current policy. | have no alternative (=to not have a choice): He says he doesn’t want to see a doctor, but I’m afraid he has no alternative.
• • •
THESAURUS
choice something or someone that has been chosen: Maria was very pleased with her choice. | first/second/third choice (=the thing you wanted most, the thing you wanted most after that etc): Greece was our first choice for a vacation, but all the flights were full. | somebody’s choice of: I don’t like his choice of friends.
selection a small group of the best things that have been chosen from a larger group: selection of: She showed me a selection of her drawings. | a selection of songs from ‘West Side Story’

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

choice

choice [choice choices choicer choicest] noun, adjective   [tʃɔɪs]    [tʃɔɪs]

noun
1. countable ~ (between A and B) an act of choosing between two or more possibilities; something that you can choose
women forced to make a choice between family and career
We are faced with a difficult choice.
We aim to help students make more informed career choices.
• Resources are finite, and choices have to be made between competing priorities and needs.

• There is a wide range of choices open to you.

2. uncountable, singular the right to choose or the possibility of choosing
If I had the choice, I would stop working tomorrow.
He had no choice but to leave (= this was the only thing he could do).
She's going to do it. She doesn't have much choice, really, does she?
This government is committed to extending parental choice in education.
• After a delicious meal with free wine, the choice is yours: a quiet drink in the bar, the late night disco or a stroll along the beach beneath a starry sky.

• Sandy had to tell his tale in halting Italian. Since Franco spoke no English, he had no choice in the matter.

3. countable a person or thing that is chosen
She's the obvious choice for the job.
Hawaii remains a popular choice for winter vacation travel.
This colour wasn't my first choice.
• She wouldn't be my choice as manager.

• I don't like his choice of friends (= the people he chooses as his friends).

4. singular, uncountable the number or range of different things from which to choose
The menu has a good choice of desserts.
There wasn't much choice of colour.
see also  Hobson's choice, multiple-choice 
more at you pays your money and you takes your choice at  pay  v., be spoilt for choice at  spoilt  
Word Origin:
Middle English: from Old French chois, from choisir ‘choose’, of Germanic origin and related to choose.  
Thesaurus:
choice noun
1. C
Many women make a choice between family and career.
selection|informal pick
make a choice/selection
have/take a/your choice/pick
get first choice/pick
2. U, C, usually sing.
If I had the choice, I'd give up work tomorrow.
He had no choice but to (= he had to) leave.
optionalternativepossibility
a real/realistic/practical choice/option/alternative/possibility
a/an good/acceptable/reasonable choice/option/alternative
have no choice/option/alternative (but to do sth)
look at/limit the choices/options/alternatives/possibilities
Choice, option or alternative? Alternative is slightly more formal than option or choice, and is more frequently used to talk about choosing between two things rather than several.
3. C
She is the first choice for the job.
preferenceselection|BrE favourite|AmE favorite|especially AmE, informal pick
sb's choice/favourite/pick for sth
sb's choice/selection/pick as sth
an obvious choice/selection/favourite
4. sing., U
a good choice of desserts
rangevarietyselectionassortmentarray
a wide choice/range/variety/selection/assortment/array
a/an good/interesting/limited choice/range/variety/selection
have/offer/provide (a/an) choice/range/variety/selection/array/assortment (of sth) 
Synonyms:
choice
favourite preference selection pick
These are all words for a person or thing that is chosen, or that is liked more than others.
choicea person or thing that is chosen: She's the obvious choice for the job.
favourite/favoritea person or thing that you like more than the others of the same type: Which one's your favourite?
preferencea thing that is liked better or best: Tastes and preferences vary from individual to individual.
favourite or preference?
Your favourites are the things you like best, and that you have, do, listen to, etc. often; your preferences are the things that you would rather have or do if you can choose.
selectiona number of people or things that have been chosen from a larger group: A selection of reader's comments are published below.
pick(rather informal, especially NAmE) a person or thing that is chosen: She was his pick for best actress.
sb's choice/favourite/pick for sth
sb's choice/selection/pick as sth
an obvious choice/favourite/selection
a(n) excellent/good/popular/fine choice/selection 
Synonyms:
option
choice alternative possibility
These are all words for sth that you choose to do in a particular situation.
optionsomething that you can choose to have or do; the freedom to choose what you do: As I see it, we have two options… Students have the option of studying abroad in their second year.
Option is also the word used in computing for one of the choices you can make when using a computer program: Choose the ‘Cut’ option from the Edit menu.
choicethe freedom to choose what you do; something that you can choose to have or do: If I had the choice, I would stop working tomorrow. There is a wide range of choices open to you.
alternativesomething that you can choose to have or do out of two or more possibilities: You can be paid in cash weekly or by cheque monthly: those are the two alternatives.
option, choice or alternative?
Choice is slightly less formal than option and alternative is slightly more formal. Choice is most often used for ‘the freedom to choose’, although you can sometimes also use option (but not usually alternative): If I had the choice/option, I would… ◊ If I had the alternative, I would… ◊ parental choice in education ◊ parental option/alternative in education. Things that you can choose are options, choices or alternatives. However, alternative is more frequently used to talk about choosing between two things rather than several.
possibilityone of the different things that you can do in a particular situation: We need to explore a wide range of possibilities. The possibilities are endless.
Possibility can be used in a similar way to option, choice and alternative, but the emphasis here is less on the need to make a choice, and more on what is available.
with/without the option/choice/possibility of sth
a(n) good/acceptable/reasonable/possible option/choice/alternative
the only option/choice/alternative/possibility open to sb
to have a/an/the option/choice of doing sth
to have no option/choice/alternative but to do sth)
a number/range of options/choices/alternatives/possibilities 
Example Bank:
Bill is the obvious choice for captain of the team.
Doctors have to make moral choices every day of their lives.
Everyone in a democracy has the right to exercise choice.
First prize will be a meal for two at a restaurant of your choice.
He had no choice about that.
I don't think much of her choice of outfit.
I had no choice but to cancel my holiday.
I now had a clear choice: either I accept their terms or I leave.
I think she's a very good choice for captain.
I wouldn't have come to this bar by choice!
In the end, the choice was quite easy.
It was a happy choice of venue
Maria defended her choice of name for the child.
Mary is a popular choice as chair of the committee.
Much ill health is the result of poor diet and lifestyle choices.
Our first choice for a holiday is the north of Scotland.
Our first choice for a site was already taken.
People were asked about their top choices for meeting locations.
She faced the stark choice of backing the new plan or losing her job.
She has a choice between three different universities.
She questioned the choice of Murphy for this role.
She was starting to regret her choice.
Smoking may limit your choice of contraception.
Students have a free choice from a range of subjects.
The hotel is the preferred choice for business people.
The shop has a very limited choice of ties.
The way he behaved meant that we had no choice in the matter.
These are personal choices that people must make for themselves.
We gave her the choice, and she decided she'd like a bike for her birthday.
We offer a choice of ten different destinations.
When did you make a conscious choice to become an artist?
You can have first choice of all the rooms.
Your decision leaves me with no choice but to resign.
Your needs should dictate your choice.
a careful choice of words
a limited range of choices available to buyers
a range of available choices
a test with multiple choice questions
to extend parental choice as to which schools children should attend
to make choices about their future
I don't like his choice of friends.
Many women are forced to make a choice between family and career.
She wouldn't be my choice as manager.
She's going to do it. She doesn't have much choice, really, does she?
She's the obvious choice for the job.
The choice is yours: a quiet drink in the bar, the late night disco or a stroll along the beach.
There wasn't much choice of colour.
• This colour wasn't my first choice.

Idioms: by choice  of choice  of your choice 

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

choice / tʃɔɪs / noun [ C or U ] (ACT)

B1 an act or the possibility of choosing:

If the product doesn't work, you are given the choice of a refund or a replacement.

It's a difficult choice to make .

It's your choice/The choice is yours (= only you can decide) .

It was a choice between pain now or pain later, so I chose pain later.

Now you know all the facts, you can make an informed choice.

I'd prefer not to work but I do n't have much choice (= this is not possible) .

He had no choice but to accept (= he had to accept) .

Is she single by choice?

Champagne is their drink of choice (= the one they most often drink) .

Word partners for choice (ACT)

have a choice • make a choice • give / offer sb a choice • be faced with a choice • an informed choice • a choice between [two things or people] • a choice of sth • by / from choice

Word partners for choice (VARIETY)

a bewildering / excellent / wide choice • offer a choice of sth • a choice of sth

Word partners for choice (PERSON/THING)

a good / obvious / popular / wise choice • an odd / unfortunate choice • sb's choice of sth • sb's first / second choice

 

choice / tʃɔɪs / noun [ S or U ] (VARIETY)

B1 the range of different things from which you can choose:

There wasn't much choice on the menu.

The evening menu offers a wide choice of dishes.

The dress is available in a choice of colours.

Word partners for choice (ACT)

have a choice • make a choice • give / offer sb a choice • be faced with a choice • an informed choice • a choice between [two things or people] • a choice of sth • by / from choice

Word partners for choice (VARIETY)

a bewildering / excellent / wide choice • offer a choice of sth • a choice of sth

Word partners for choice (PERSON/THING)

a good / obvious / popular / wise choice • an odd / unfortunate choice • sb's choice of sth • sb's first / second choice
 

choice / tʃɔɪs / noun [ C ] (PERSON/THING)

B1 a person or thing that has been chosen or that can be chosen:

Harvard was not his first choice.

He wouldn't be my choice as a friend.

This type of nursery care may well be the best choice for your child.

Word partners for choice (ACT)

have a choice • make a choice • give / offer sb a choice • be faced with a choice • an informed choice • a choice between [two things or people] • a choice of sth • by / from choice

Word partners for choice (VARIETY)

a bewildering / excellent / wide choice • offer a choice of sth • a choice of sth

Word partners for choice (PERSON/THING)

a good / obvious / popular / wise choice • an odd / unfortunate choice • sb's choice of sth • sb's first / second choice

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

choice

[tʃɔ͟ɪs]
 ♦♦
 choices, choicer, choicest

 1) N-COUNT If there is a choice of things, there are several of them and you can choose the one you want.
  It's available in a choice of colours...
  At lunchtime, there's a choice between the buffet or the set menu...
  Club Sportif offer a wide choice of holidays.
  Syn:
  selection
 2) N-COUNT: usu poss N Your choice is someone or something that you choose from a range of things.
  Although he was only grumbling, his choice of words made Rodney angry.
  Syn:
  selection
 3) ADJ-GRADED: ADJ n Choice means of very high quality. [FORMAL]
  ...Fortnum and Mason's choicest chocolates.
  Syn:
  select
 4) PHRASE: V inflects If you have no choice but to do something or have little choice but to do it, you cannot avoid doing it.
  They had little choice but to agree to what he suggested.
 5) PHRASE: n PHR The thing or person of your choice is the one that you choose.
  ...tickets to see the football team of your choice...
  In many societies children still marry someone of their parents' choice.

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

1choice /ˈʧoɪs/ noun, pl choic·es
1 [count] : the act of choosing : the act of picking or deciding between two or more possibilities
• He knew he had to make a choice. [=choose one thing or another]
• He has some important choices to make.
• You made a good/bad choice.
• She was faced with a difficult choice.
• You can either accept the job or not. It's your choice.
• I read about the various options so that I could make an informed choice.
2 : the opportunity or power to choose between two or more possibilities : the opportunity or power to make a decision

[singular]

• Given the choice, I'd rather stay home tonight.
• He had no choice in the matter. = He did not have a choice in the matter.
• You leave me (with) no choice.
• They gave/offered me a choice between an automatic or standard transmission.

[noncount]

• A flexible health insurance plan gives patients more choice about doctors and coverage.
• He had little choice in the matter. = He did not have much choice in the matter.
- see also hobson's choice
3 a : a range of things that can be chosen

[singular]

- often + of
• The plan has a wide choice of options. [=there are many options that can be chosen]
• You have the choice of coffee or tea.

[noncount]

• The menu does not have much choice. [=selection]
• (chiefly Brit) Customers are spoiled for choice [=customers have a lot of choices] when buying a new car.
b [count] : one of the things that you can choose
• She wanted pizza, but that wasn't a choice. [=option]
• There is a wide range of choices.
• Other choices on the menu looked equally tempting.
- see also multiple-choice
4 [count] : the person or thing that someone chooses
• He is happy with his choice.
• She is my first choice for the job. [=she is the one I most want for the job]
• I don't like her choice of friends.
• Selling our car was the right choice.
by choice also out of choice
✦If you do something by choice or out of choice, you choose to do it.
• I live here by choice. [=I live here because I want to]
• No one forced them to do it. They acted out of choice.
of choice : favorite or most liked : chosen most often
• Wine was his beverage of choice.
of your choice
✦A person or thing of your choice is a person or thing that you have chosen.
• They said I could bring a guest of my choice to the party.
• The meal is served with a beverage of your choice.

rise

rise [verb] (MOVE UP)

To move upwards

US /raɪz/ 
UK /raɪz/ 

طلوع‌ كردن‌، برآمدن‌

مثال: 

At 6 a.m. we watched the sun rise

Oxford Essential Dictionary

rise

 verb (rises, rising, rose /, has risen )

1 to go up; to become higher or more:
Smoke was rising from the chimney.
Prices have risen by 20 %.

2 to get up from a sitting or lying position:
She rose to her feet.

3 If the sun or moon rises, it moves up in the sky:
The sun rises in the east and sets (= goes down) in the west.

 

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

rise

I. rise1 S2 W1 /raɪz/ BrE AmE verb (past tense rose /rəʊz $ roʊz/, past participle risen /ˈrɪzən/) [intransitive]
[Language: Old English; Origin: risan]
1. INCREASE to increase in number, amount, or value SYN go up OPP fall
rise by
Sales rose by 20% over the Christmas period.
rise from/to
The research budget rose from £175,000 in 1999 to £22.5 million in 2001.
rise above
Temperatures rarely rise above freezing.
rise dramatically/sharply/rapidly/steeply etc
The number of people seeking asylum in Britain has risen sharply.
The divorce rate has risen steadily since the 1950s.
rising crime/unemployment/inflation etc
The country faces economic recession and rising unemployment.
The police seem unable to cope with the rising tide of (=large increase in) car crime.
REGISTER
In everyday English, people usually say an amount or level goes up rather than rises:
▪ Prices have gone up a lot.
2. GO UPWARDS to go upwards OPP fall:
The floodwaters began to rise again.
She watched the bubbles rise to the surface.
the problems caused by climate change and rising sea levels
rise from
Smoke rose from the chimney.
The road rises steeply from the village.
The waves rose and fell.
3. STAND formal to stand up:
Then she picked up her bag and rose to leave.
rise from the table/your chair etc
The chairman rose from his chair and came forward to greet her.
He put down his glass and rose to his feet.
4. BECOME SUCCESSFUL to become important, powerful, successful, or rich OPP fall
rise to
He rose to the rank of major.
rise to prominence/fame/power
He had swiftly risen to prominence during the 1950s.
Mussolini rose to power in Italy in 1922.
people who rise to the top in their chosen professions
rise to do something
He rose to become chairman of the company.
She had joined the company as a secretary and risen through the ranks (=made progress from a low position to a high position) to become a senior sales director.
5. BE TALL (also rise up) to be very tall
rise above
The cliffs rose above them.
rise from
huge rocks rising from the sea
The bridge rose majestically into the air.
6. VOICE/SOUND
a) to be loud enough to be heard
rise from
The sound of traffic rose from the street below.
rise above
Her voice rose above the shouts of the children.
b) to become louder or higher:
His voice rose in frustration.
7. SUN/MOON/STAR to appear in the sky OPP set:
The sun rises in the east.
8. EMOTION if a feeling or emotion rises, you feel it more and more strongly:
She could sense her temper rising again.
There was an atmosphere of rising excitement in the school.
The doctor sounded optimistic and John’s hopes rose.
9. rise to the occasion/challenge to deal successfully with a difficult situation or problem, especially by working harder or performing better than usual:
a young athlete who can certainly rise to the occasion
The team rose to the challenge.
10. AGAINST A GOVERNMENT/ARMY (also rise up) if a large group of people rise, they try to defeat the government, army etc that is controlling them:
They rose up and overthrew the government.
rise against
The prisoners rose against the guards and escaped.
rise in revolt/rebellion
They rose in rebellion against the king.
11. BREAD/CAKES ETC if bread, cakes etc rise, they become bigger because there is air inside them
12. BED literary to get out of bed in the morning
13. ALIVE AGAIN to come alive after having died ⇨ resurrection
rise from the dead/grave
On the third day Jesus rose from the dead.
14. COURT/PARLIAMENT if a court or parliament rises, that particular meeting is formally finished
15. WIND formal if the wind rises, it becomes stronger:
The wind had risen again and it was starting to rain.
16. RIVER literary if a river rises somewhere, it begins there:
The Rhine rises in Switzerland.
17. rise and shine spoken used humorously to tell someone to wake up and get out of bed
• • •
COLLOCATIONS
■ adverbs
sharply/steeply (=a lot in a short time) The value of the painting has risen sharply in recent years.
dramatically (=a lot and very suddenly) Unemployment rose dramatically.
rapidly/quickly/fast House prices rose rapidly last year.
significantly (=in a way that shows something important) Male cancer rates rose significantly during the period 1969–78.
substantially (=a lot) University fees have risen substantially.
steadily My salary had risen steadily each year.
slightly The water temperature had risen slightly.
rise above something phrasal verb
if someone rises above a bad situation or bad influences, they do not let these things affect them because they are mentally strong or have strong moral principles:
You expect a certain amount of criticism, but you have to rise above it.
I try to rise above such prejudices.
rise to something phrasal verb
if you rise to a remark, you reply to it rather than ignoring it, especially because it has made you angry:
You shouldn’t rise to his comments.
He refused to rise to the bait (=react in the way someone wanted him to).

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

verb (rose   [rəʊz]  ;   [roʊz]  risen   [ˈrɪzn]  ;   [ˈrɪzn]  

 

MOVE UPWARDS
1. intransitive (+ adv./prep.) to come or go upwards; to reach a higher level or position
• Smoke was rising from the chimney.

• The river has risen (by) several metres.  

GET UP

2. intransitive (+ adv./prep.) (formal) to get up from a lying, sitting or kneeling position
Syn:  get up
He was accustomed to rising (= getting out of bed) early.
• They rose from the table.

• She rose to her feet.  

OF SUN/MOON

3. intransitive when the sun, moon, etc. rises, it appears above the horizon
• The sun rises in the east.

Opp:  set  

END MEETING

4. intransitive (formal) (of a group of people) to end a meeting
Syn:  adjourn

• The House (= members of the House of Commons) rose at 10 p.m.  

INCREASE

5. intransitive to increase in amount or number
rising fuel bills
The price of gas rose.
Gas rose in price.
• Unemployment rose (by) 3%.

• Air pollution has risen above an acceptable level.  

BECOME POWERFUL/IMPORTANT

6. intransitive (+ adv./prep.) to become more successful, important, powerful, etc
a rising young politician
She rose to power in the 70s.
• He rose to the rank of general.

• She rose through the ranks to become managing director.  

OF SOUND

7. intransitive if a sound rises, it become louder and higher

• Her voice rose angrily.  

OF WIND

8. intransitive if the wind rises, it begins to blow more strongly
Syn:  get up

• The wind is rising— I think there's a storm coming.  

OF FEELING

9. intransitive (formal) if a feeling rises inside you, it begins and gets stronger
• He felt anger rising inside him.

• Her spirits rose (= she felt happier) at the news.  

OF YOUR COLOUR

10. intransitive (formal) if your colour rises, your face becomes pink or red with embarrassment  

OF HAIR
11. intransitive if hair rises, it stands vertical instead of lying flat

• The hair on the back of my neck rose when I heard the scream.  

FIGHT

12. intransitive ~ (up) (against sb/sth) (formal) to begin to fight against your ruler or government or against a foreign army
Syn:  rebel
The peasants rose in revolt.
• He called on the people to rise up against the invaders.

related noun  uprising  

BECOME VISIBLE

13. intransitive (formal) to be or become visible above the surroundings

• Mountains rose in the distance.  

OF LAND

14. intransitive if land rises, it slopes upwards

• The ground rose steeply all around.  

OF BEGINNING OF RIVER

15. intransitive + adv./prep. a river rises where it begins to flow

• The Thames rises in the Cotswold hills.  

OF BREAD/CAKES

 

16. intransitive when bread, cakes, etc. rise, they swell because of the action of yeast or baking powder  

OF DEAD PERSON
17. intransitive ~ (from sth) to come to life again
to rise from the dead
(figurative) Can a new party rise from the ashes of the old one?
more at sb's gorge rises at  gorge  n., make sb's hackles rise at  hackles, draw yourself up/rise to your full height at  height 
 
Word Origin:
Old English rīsan ‘make an attack’, ‘wake, get out of bed’, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch rijzen and German reisen.  
Thesaurus:
rise verb
1. I
rising fuel bills/divorce rates
increasegrowclimbescalatejumprocket|especially spoken go up|written soar|disapproving spiralshoot up|often approving leap|especially business surge
Opp: fall, Opp: drop, Opp: sink
rise/increase/grow/jump/go up/shoot up/soar in price, number, etc.
rise/increase/grow/go up/climb/jump/rocket/shoot up/soar (by) 10%, 200, etc.
rise/increase/grow/go up/climb/escalate/jump/rocket/shoot up/soar from 2% to 5%
Rise, increase or grow? Rise is the most frequent of these verbs. It is used most often about the number or level of sth; grow and increase can also be used about size and strength:
Profits/Numbers have risen/grown/increased.
Her confidence grew/increased.
 ¤ Her confidence rose.
2. I
From the river the ground rises steeply towards the north.
slopeclimb
Opp: drop away
rise/slope/climb towards sth
rise/slopeclimb steeply
rise/slope gently/slightly  
Language Bank:
increase
Describing an increase
Student numbers in English language schools in this country increased from 66 000 in 2008 to just over 84 000 in 2009.
The number of students increased by almost 30% compared with the previous year.
Student numbers shot up / increased dramatically in 2009.
The proportion of Spanish students rose sharply from 5% in 2008 to 14% in 2009.
There was a significant rise in student numbers in 2009.
The 2009 figure was 84 000, an increase of 28% on the previous year.
The 2009 figure was 84 000, 28 per cent up on the previous year.
As the chart shows, this can partly be explained by a dramatic increase in students from Spain.
Language Banks at expect, fall, illustrate, proportion  
Synonyms:
stand
get up stand up rise get to your feet be on your feet
These words all mean to be in an upright position with your weight on your feet, or to put yourself in this position.
standto be in an upright position with your weight on your feet: She was too weak to stand. Stand still when I'm talking to you!
Stand is usually used with an adverb or prepositional phrase to show where or how sb stands, but sometimes another phrase or clause is used to show what sb does while they are standing: We stood talking for a few minutes. He stood and looked out to sea.
get upto get into a standing position from a sitting, kneeling or lying position: Please don't get up!
stand upto be in a standing position; to stand after sitting: Stand up straight! Everyone would stand up when the teacher entered the classroom.
stand, get up or stand up?
Stand usually means ‘to be in a standing position’ but can also mean ‘to get into a standing position’. Stand up can be used with either of these meanings, but its use is more restricted: it is used especially when sb tells sb or a group of people to stand. Get up is the most frequent way of saying ‘get into a standing position’, and this can be from a sitting, kneeling or lying position; if you stand up, this is nearly always after sitting, especially on a chair. If you want to tell sb politely that they do not need to move from their chair, use get up: Please don't stand up!
rise(formal) to get into a standing position from a sitting, kneeling or lying position: Would you all rise, please, to welcome our visiting speaker.
get to your feetto stand up after sitting, kneeling or lying: I helped her to get to her feet.
be on your feetto be standing up: I've been on my feet all day.  
Example Bank:
Adam rose abruptly from the table.
Entry standards into the profession are set to rise further.
Gas rose in price.
He made to rise but found his legs were not strong enough to support him.
He rose early and went for a walk.
He rose to his full height and leaned across the table.
House prices have risen sharply in recent months.
Inflation rose from 2% to 5% last year.
Lush green mountains rise up behind the airport.
Pensions will rise in line with inflation.
She rose shakily to her feet and looked around.
She rose slowly from her chair to greet us.
She rose unsteadily to her feet.
Smoke rose from the chimney.
Somehow he managed to rise to a sitting position.
Tall chimneys rise into the air.
The cost of health care is rising faster than ever.
Unemployment has risen by 25 000 this month.
the cliffs which rise majestically from the ocean
Behind the house the ground rises steeply to the north.
Interest rates are expected to rise from 4.5% to 5% in the next six months.
The price of gas has risen by 3%.
• Would you all rise, please, to welcome our visiting speaker.

• rising fuel bills/divorce rates

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

rise / raɪz / verb ( rose , risen ) (MOVE UP)

B1 [ I ] to move upwards:

The balloon rose gently (up) into the air.

At 6 a.m. we watched the sun rise (= appear and move upwards in the sky) .

When you put yeast in bread and bake the bread, it rises (= gets bigger) .

New buildings are rising (= being built) throughout the city.

The River Cam rises (= first comes out of the ground) in/at a place called Ashwell.

figurative Murmurs of disapproval rose from (= came from) the crowd.

[ I ] to stand, especially after sitting:

She rose from her chair to welcome us.

He rose to his feet to deliver his speech.

[ I ] formal to get out of bed:

My grandfather rises at five every morning to do his exercises.

rise / raɪz / verb ( rose , risen ) (INCREASE)

B2 [ I ] to increase:

Inflation is rising at/by 2.1 percent a month.

The wind/storm is rising (= beginning to get stronger) .

[ I ] When emotions, etc. rise, they start to increase:

Tempers are rising (= people are becoming angry) .

My spirits rise (= I feel happier) whenever I think of my friends.

She felt panic and terror rise in her whenever she thought of the future.

His voice rose (= became louder or higher) as he got angry.

 

rise / raɪz / verb [ I ] ( rose , risen ) (BECOME SUCCESSFUL)

C2 to become important, successful, or powerful:

After a long career with the company, she has risen to the position of chief executive.

He rose to power as the country emerged from its financial crisis.

She quickly rose through the ranks to become head of marketing.

The singer has risen from humble origins to become one of the most successful entertainers of all time.
 

rise / raɪz / verb [ I ] ( rose , risen ) (BECOME HIGHER)

to become higher:

The ground rises over there.

The castle is built on rising ground (= ground higher than areas around it) .

You can see the Alps rising (= showing as a higher area) in the distance/ above the clouds.

 

rise / raɪz / verb [ I usually + adv/prep ] ( rose , risen ) (BE OPPOSED TO)

(of a group of people) to begin to oppose or fight a bad government or ruler:

The people rose (up) against the oppressor/tyrant/dictator.

 

rise / raɪz / verb [ I ] ( rose , risen ) formal (STOP WORK)

If parliament or a court rises, it stops work:

Parliament/The court rose at 6 p.m.

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

rise

[ra͟ɪz]
 
 rises, rising, rose, risen

 1) VERB If something rises, it moves upwards.
  [V from/to n] Wilson's ice-cold eyes watched the smoke rise from his cigarette...
  The powdery dust rose in a cloud around him.
 PHRASAL VERB
 Rise up means the same as rise. V P from/to n Spray rose up from the surface of the water... V P Black dense smoke rose up.
 2) VERB When you rise, you stand up. [FORMAL]
  [V from n] Luther rose slowly from the chair...
  He looked at Livy and Mark, who had risen to greet him.
 PHRASAL VERB
 Rise up means the same as rise. Also V P V P from n The only thing I wanted was to rise up from the table and leave this house.
 3) VERB When you rise, you get out of bed. [FORMAL]
  Tony had risen early and gone to the cottage to work.
 4) VERB When the sun or moon rises, it appears in the sky.
  He wanted to be over the line of the ridge before the sun had risen.
  Ant:
  set
 5) VERB You can say that something rises when it appears as a large tall shape. [LITERARY]
  [V prep/adv] The building rose before him, tall and stately...
  [V prep/adv] The towers rise out of a concrete podium.
 PHRASAL VERB
 Rise up means the same as rise. V P prep/adv The White Mountains rose up before me.
 6) VERB If the level of something such as the water in a river rises, it becomes higher.
  The waters continue to rise as more than 1,000 people are evacuated.
  ...the tides rise and fall.
  Ant:
  fall
 7) VERB If land rises, it slopes upwards.
  [V prep/adv] He looked up the slope of land that rose from the house...
  The ground begins to rise some 20 yards away...
  [V-ing] The great house stood on rising ground.
  Ant:
  fall
 8) N-COUNT: usu sing A rise is an area of ground that slopes upwards.
  The pub itself was on a rise, commanding views across the countryside...
  I climbed to the top of a rise overlooking the ramparts.
  Syn:
  slope
 9) VERB If an amount rises, it increases.
  [V from/to amount] Pre-tax profits rose from ₤842,000 to ₤1.82m...
  [V by amount] Tourist trips of all kinds in Britain rose by 10.5% between 1977 and 1987...
  [V amount] Exports in June rose 1.5% to a record $30.91 billion...
  Investment levels have fallen, while the number of business failures has risen...
  [V-ing] The increase is needed to meet rising costs.
  Ant:
  fall
 10) N-COUNT: N in n A rise in the amount of something is an increase in it.
  ...the prospect of another rise in interest rates...
  Foreign nationals have begun leaving because of a sharp rise in violence.
  Syn:
  leap
 11) N-COUNT A rise is an increase in your wages or your salary. [BRIT]
  He will get a pay rise of nearly ₤4,000.
  Syn:
  increase(in AM, use raise)
 12) N-SING: the N of n The rise of a movement or activity is an increase in its popularity or influence.
  The rise of racism in America is a serious concern.
  ...the rise of home ownership.
  Syn:
  growth
 13) VERB If the wind rises, it becomes stronger.
  The wind was still rising, approaching a force nine gale.
 PHRASAL VERB
 Rise up means the same as rise. V P Foxworth shivered as the wind rose up and roared through the beech trees.
 14) VERB If a sound rises or if someone's voice rises, it becomes louder or higher.
  `Bernard?' Her voice rose hysterically...
  [V to n] His voice rose almost to a scream.
 15) VERB If a sound rises from a group of people, it comes from them.
  [V from n] There were low, muffled voices rising from the hallway.
 PHRASAL VERB
 Rise up means the same as rise. V P From the people, a cheer rose up.
 16) VERB If an emotion rises in someone, they suddenly feel it very intensely so that it affects their behaviour.
  A tide of emotion rose and clouded his judgement...
  [V in n] The thought made anger rise in him and he went into a bar and had a double whisky.
 17) VERB If your colour rises or if a blush rises in your cheeks, you turn red because you feel angry, embarrassed, or excited.
  [V in n] Amy felt the colour rising in her cheeks at the thought. [Also V]
 18) VERB When the people in a country rise, they try to defeat the government or army that is controlling them.
  [V against n] The National Convention has promised armed support to any people who wish to rise against armed oppression. [Also V]
  Syn:
  rebel
  Derived words:
  rising plural N-COUNT ...popular risings against tyrannical rulers.
 PHRASAL VERB
 Rise up means the same as rise. V P He warned that if the government moved against him the people would rise up... V P against n A woman called on the population to rise up against the government.
 19) VERB If someone rises to a higher position or status, they become more important, successful, or powerful.
  [V prep] She is a strong woman who has risen to the top of a deeply sexist organisation...
  [V prep] From an unlikely background he has risen rapidly through the ranks of government.
 PHRASAL VERB
 Rise up means the same as rise. V P prep I started with Hoover 26 years ago in sales and rose up through the ranks.
 20) N-SING: with poss The rise of someone is the process by which they become more important, successful, or powerful.
  Haig's rise was fuelled by an all-consuming sense of patriotic duty...
  The group celebrated the regime's rise to power in 1979.
  Ant:
  fall
 21) PHRASE: V inflects, PHR n If something gives rise to an event or situation, it causes that event or situation to happen.
  Low levels of choline in the body can give rise to high blood-pressure...
  The picture gave rise to speculation that the three were still alive and being held captive.
  Syn:
  provoke
 22) to rise to the baitsee bait
 to rise to the challengesee challenge
 to rise to the occasionsee occasion
  Phrasal Verbs:
  - rise above
  - rise up

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

1rise /ˈraɪz/ verb ris·es; rose /ˈroʊz/; ris·en /ˈrɪzn̩/; ris·ing /ˈraɪzɪŋ/ [no obj]
1 a : to move upward
• Smoke was rising into the air.
• Bubbles rose to the surface of water.
• The airplane rose [=(more formally) ascended] into the sky.
- often + up
• Smoke was rising up into the air.
• The airplane rose up from the runway.
- sometimes used figuratively
• His spirits rose [=he began to feel happier] when he heard the good news.
b : to become higher
• The tide rose and fell.
• The river is rising.
c : to slope or extend upward
• The land rises as you move away from the coast.
• The road rose gently/steeply.
• a tower rising above the little town
• steeply/sharply rising mountain peaks
- often + up
• The mountains rose up before us.
2 : to advance to a higher level or position : to become more popular, successful, etc.
• a politician who rose to fame/power/prominence very quickly
• Empires rise [=become powerful, important, etc.] and fall.
• The book has risen to the top of best-seller lists.
• She rose through the ranks of the company to become president. [=she began her career with the company with little power or authority and gradually gained more power and authority until she had become president]
• She has risen in my estimation. [=I think more highly of her; I respect/admire her more]
3 a : to increase in amount, number, level, etc. : to become more
• Sales have risen [=increased] in recent months.
• People are angry about rising gasoline prices.
• The population has been rising [=growing] dramatically/sharply/markedly.
• Stocks rose (by) several points in early trading today.
• The market is continuing to rise.
b : to become stronger : to increase in strength
• The wind rose in the afternoon.
• My anger rose as I thought about what she had said.
c : to become louder : to increase in volume
• The music rose and fell.
• Her voice rose to an angry shout.
4 a : to stand up
• He rose slowly (to his feet).
• She quickly rose from the chair and began to walk away.
b : to get up from sleeping in a bed
• He rose refreshed after a good night's sleep.
Rise and shine! [=wake up and get out of bed]
5 of the sun or moon : to appear above the horizon
• The sun rises [=comes up] in the morning and sets at night.
• We watched as the moon rose in the eastern sky.
- opposite 1set 11
6 of bread, cake, etc. : to become bigger because of being filled with air bubbles made through a chemical process
• Yeast will make the dough rise.
7 : to begin to fight in order to remove a ruler or government
• The people rose in rebellion/revolt.
- often + up
• He told the people that they should rise up and overthrow the corrupt government.
8 : to live again after dying : to come back to life
• a belief that the dead will rise again [=will live again]
• Christians believe that Jesus Christ rose from the dead.
rise above [phrasal verb] rise above (something)
1 : to not allow yourself to be hurt or controlled by (something bad or harmful)
• We need to rise above our anger/frustration and find a way to get along with each other.
• She rose above the prejudice of her time to become a great civil rights leader.
• It's time to rise above petty bickering/politics.
2 : to be or become better than (something)
• The quality of the food never rises above average.
rise to the occasion/challenge : to make the special effort that is required to successfully deal with a difficult situation
• No one was sure if he could handle the pressure of making a speech, but he rose to the occasion and did an excellent job.
• When the company needed to increase its sales, its employees rose to the challenge.
your gorge rises
- see 1gorge

hang around

hang around [phrasal verb] (somewhere)

To wait or spend time somewhere, usually for no particular reason

US /hæŋ/ 
UK /hæŋ/ 

 

وقت‌ را ببطالت‌ گذراندن‌، ول‌ گشتن‌

مثال: 

I spent most of my youth hanging around the bars of Dublin.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

hang about

hang about phrasal verb British English (see also ↑hang)
1. spoken to move slowly or take too long doing something:
Come on, we haven’t got time to hang about!
2. hang about (something) to spend time somewhere without any real purpose:
There were always groups of boys hanging about in the square.
He normally hung about the house all day.
3. hang about! spoken
a) used to ask someone to wait or stop what they are doing
b) used when you have just noticed or thought of something that is interesting or wrong:
Hang about – that can’t be right.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

hang around ( … )

ˌhang aˈround (…) derived

(informal) to wait or stay near a place, not doing very much

You hang around here in case he comes, and I'll go on ahead.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

hang around (somewhere ) ( UK also hang about ) — phrasal verb with hang / hæŋ / verb

B1 to wait or spend time somewhere, usually for no particular reason:

I spent most of my youth hanging around the bars of Dublin.

I thought I'd hang around for a while and see if she comes.

 

hang around ( UK also hang about ) informal — phrasal verb with hang / hæŋ / verb

to move or do things slowly:

Go and pack but don't hang around - we have to go in an hour.
 

hang around with sb ( UK also hang about with sb ) — phrasal verb with hang / hæŋ / verb

to spend time with someone:

I got into drugs because I was hanging around with the wrong people.

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

hang around

 (in BRIT, also use hang about, hang round)
 1) PHRASAL VERB If you hang around, hang about, or hang round, you stay in the same place doing nothing, usually because you are waiting for something or someone. [INFORMAL]
  [V P -ing] He got sick of hanging around waiting for me...
  [V P] On Saturdays we hang about in the park.
  [V P n] ...those people hanging round the streets at 6 am with nowhere to go.
 2) PHRASAL VERB If you hang around, hang about, or hang round with someone or in a particular place, you spend a lot of time with that person or in that place. [INFORMAL]
  [V P together] They usually hung around together most of the time...
  [V P with n] Helen used to hang round with the boys.
  [V P n] ...the usual young crowd who hung around the cafe day in and day out.

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

hang around or Brit hang about/round [phrasal verb] informal
1 hang around/about/round or hang around/about/round (a place) : to be or stay in a place for a period of time without doing much
• We just hung around all afternoon, listening to music.
• They hung around the theater after the play was over.
2 hang around/about/round with (someone) : to spend time relaxing, talking, or doing things with (someone)
• She hangs around with older kids.
• Who does he usually hang around with?

get in sb's hair

get in sb's hair [idiom]

To annoy or irritate someone especially by being near them all the time

get in sb's hair - کسی را اذیت و کلافه کردن

کسی را اذیت و کلافه کردن

مثال: 

I love Kate’s kids, but they are really noisy and messy. It’s been three days I’m trying to be nice to them but they are getting in my hair. I don’t know what to do anymore.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

get in sb's hair informal

to annoy someone, usually by being present all the time:

My flatmate has been getting in my hair a bit recently.

© Cambridge University Press 2013

you scratch my back and I'll scratch yours

you scratch my back and I'll scratch yours [idiom]

Help someone back who has helped you

you scratch my back and I'll scratch yours - لطف کسی را جبران کردن

لطف کسی را جبران کردن

مثال: 

Ali: Sue, would you please give me a hand with my math homework? Sue: Sure, I’ll do it if you promise to help me with the housework later. Scratch my back and I’ll scratch yours.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

You scratch my back, I’ll scratch yoursspoken used to say that you will help someone if they agree to help you

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

you scratch my back and I'll scratch yours

informal

used to tell someone that if they help you, you will help them

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

you scratch my back, I'll scratch yours

phrase

People say 'You scratch my back and I'll scratch yours' to mean that one person helps another on condition that the second person helps them in return.

[informal]

string someone along

string someone along [idiom]

To deliberately deceive someone about your plans or intentions over a period of time; to make someone believe something while you know for a fact that you are misleading them and giving them false hopes about that thing

string someone along - کسی را به بازی گرفتن

فریب دادن کسی، کسی را به بازی گرفتن، سر کار گذاشتن

مثال: 

Can’t you see he has strung you around? There is no pay raise or promotion and he only wants you to do all his duties to go on holiday freely.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

string along phrasal verb informal1 string somebody along to deceive someone for a long time by making them believe that you will help them, that you love them etc He’s just stringing you along.2 British English to go somewhere with someone for a short time, especially because you do not have anything else to dowith If you’re going into town, I’ll string along with you.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

string sb along — phrasal verb with string / strɪŋ / verb [ T ] ( strung , strung )

to deceive someone for a long time about what you are really intending to do:

She's been promising to pay back the money for six months, but I reckon she's just stringing me along.

He strung her along for years, saying he'd marry her and divorce his wife.

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

string along

phrasal verb

If you string someone along, you deceive them by letting them believe you have the same desires, beliefs, or hopes as them.

[informal]

The longer you string him along, the more hurt he will be when you dump him. [VERB noun PARTICLE]

talk through one's hat

talk through one's hat [idiom]

say foolish things; make stupid comments

talk through one's hat - مزخرف گفتن

مزخرف گفتن

مثال: 

He was speaking nonsense about world economy. He knew nothing about it. He only talked through his hat.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

29 be talking through your hat British English informal if someone is talking through their hat, they say stupid things about something that they do not understand

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

talk through your hat

uk informal

to talk about something without understanding what you are talking about:

Nothing of what he said made sense - he was talking through his hat.

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

talk through one's hat in British

a. 

to talk foolishly

b. 

to deceive or bluff

mind your P's and Q's

mind your P's and Q's [idiom]

Try to be as polite as you can; mind your behavior and try to be polite.

mind your P's and Q's - مواظب حرف زدن خود بودن

مراقب رفتار خود بودن، مودب بودن، مواظب حرف زدن خود بودن

مثال: 

Susie, mind you P’s and Q’s when Aunt Martha is here and be a little good sweet girl. She likes polite girls.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

mind your p's and q's old-fashioned

to make an effort to be especially polite in a particular situation:

I have to mind my p's and q's when I'm with my grandmother.

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

mind your p's and q's also US watch your p's and q's : to be careful about behaving in a polite or proper way
• We knew to mind our p's and q's around our aunt.

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