B1 (متوسط)

coconut

coconut [noun]

a large fruit like a nut with a thick, hard, brown shell containing hard, white flesh that can be eaten and a clear liquid B1 [ U ] the white flesh of the coconut, often used in cooking

US /ˈkoʊ.kə.nʌt/ 
UK /ˈkəʊ.kə.nʌt/ 

نارگیل

مثال: 

grated/shredded coconut

Oxford Essential Dictionary

coconut

 noun
a large fruit that grows on trees in hot countries. Coconuts are brown and hard on the outside, and they have sweet white food and liquid inside.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

coconut

coconut /ˈkəʊkənʌt $ ˈkoʊ-/ BrE AmE noun
[Date: 1600-1700; Origin: coco 'coconut' (16-18 centuries) (from Portuguese, 'grinning face'; because the bottom of a coconut, with its three spots, looks like a face) + nut]

1. [countable] the large brown seed of a tropical tree, which has a hard shell containing white flesh that you can eat and a milky liquid that you can drink:
large tropical gardens of coconut palms
2. [uncountable] the white flesh of a coconut, often used in cooking:
desiccated coconut (=dried coconut)

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

coconut

co·co·nut [coconut coconuts]   [ˈkəʊkənʌt]    [ˈkoʊkənʌt]  noun
 

1. countable the large nut of a tropical tree called a coconut palm. It grows inside a hard shell and contains a soft white substance that can be eaten and juice that can be drunk.

2. uncountable the soft white substance inside a coconut, used in cooking
desiccated coconut
coconut biscuits/cookies
coconut oil  
Example Bank:
She broke open the coconut and drank its sweet milk.
a bay fringed with swaying coconut palms

huge bunches of fresh coconuts

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

coconut / ˈkəʊ.kə.nʌt /   / ˈkoʊ- / noun

coconut

B1 [ C ] a large fruit like a nut with a thick, hard, brown shell containing hard, white flesh that can be eaten and a clear liquid B1 [ U ] the white flesh of the coconut, often used in cooking:

grated/shredded coconut

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

coconut

[ko͟ʊkənʌt]
 coconuts
 1) N-COUNT A coconut is a very large nut with a hairy shell, which has white flesh and milky juice inside it.
  ...the smell of roasted meats mingled with spices, coconut oil and ripe tropical fruits.
 2) N-UNCOUNT Coconut is the white flesh of a coconut.
  Desiccated coconut is used by confectioners and cake makers for its flavour.

 

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

coconut

co·co·nut /ˈkoʊkəˌnʌt/ noun, pl -nuts
1 [count] : a large fruit that has a thick shell with white flesh and liquid inside it and that grows on a palm tree - see color picture 
2 [noncount] : the white flesh of a coconut
• The pastry is covered with shredded coconut.
• a piece of coconut

olive

olive [noun]

a small bitter green or black fruit that is eaten or used to produce oil, or a Mediterranean tree on which this fruit grows

US /ˈɑː.lɪv/ 
UK /ˈɒl.ɪv/ 

زیتون

مثال: 

olive groves

Oxford Essential Dictionary

olive

 noun
a small green or black fruit, that people eat or make into oil

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

olive

olive /ˈɒləv, ˈɒlɪv $ ˈɑː-/ BrE AmE noun
[Date: 1100-1200; Language: Old French; Origin: Latin oliva, from Greek elaia]
1. [countable] a small bitter egg-shaped black or green fruit, used as food and for making oil
2. [countable] (also olive tree) a tree that produces olives, grown especially in Mediterranean countries:
an olive grove
3. [uncountable] (also olive green) a deep yellowish green colour
4. olive skin/complexion skin colour that is typical of people from countries such as Greece, Italy, or Turkey
5. extend/offer/hold out etc an olive branch (to somebody) to do or say something in order to show that you want to end an argument with someone
—olive adjective:
an olive sweatshirt

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

olive

olive [olive olives] noun, adjective   [ˈɒlɪv]    [ˈɑːlɪv] 

 

noun

1. countable a small green or black fruit with a strong taste, used in cooking and for its oil

2. (also ˈolive tree) countable a tree on which olives grow

• olive groves

3. (also ˌolive ˈgreen) uncountable a yellowish-green colour 
Word Origin:

Middle English: via Old French from Latin oliva, from Greek elaia, from elaion ‘oil’.

 

adjective

1. (also ˌolive-ˈgreen) yellowish-green in colour

2. (of skin) yellowish-brown in colour
an olive complexion  
Word Origin:
Middle English: via Old French from Latin oliva, from Greek elaia, from elaion ‘oil’.  
Example Bank:
• The thin straps revealed the pale olive tone of her shoulders.

• a dark olive green carpet

 

See also: olive green  olive tree

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

olive / ˈɒl.ɪv /   / ˈɑː.lɪv / noun [ C ]

olive

B1 a small bitter green or black fruit that is eaten or used to produce oil, or a Mediterranean tree on which this fruit grows:

olive groves

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

olive

[ɒ̱lɪv]
 olives
 1) N-VAR Olives are small green or black fruit with a bitter taste. Olives are often pressed to make olive oil.
 2) N-COUNT An olive tree or an olive is a tree on which olives grow.
  Olives look romantic on a hillside in Provence.
  ...an olive grove.
 3) COLOUR Something that is olive is yellowish-green in colour.
  ...glowing colours such as deep red, olive, saffron and ochre.
 COMB in COLOUR
 Olive is also a combining form. She wore an olive-green T-shirt.
 4) ADJ: usu ADJ n If someone has olive skin, the colour of their skin is light brown.
  They are handsome with dark, shining hair, olive skin and fine brown eyes.

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

olive

ol·ive /ˈɑːlɪv/ noun, pl -ives
1 [count]
a : a small, egg-shaped black or green fruit that is used as food or for making oil
• a sauce made with chopped olives
b : a tree on which olives grow - called also olive tree,
2 [noncount] : a yellowish-green color
• Does the suit come in olive?
- called also olive green,
- see color picture
- olive adj
• She has olive skin. [=her skin has a yellowish-green tone to it]
• He has an olive complexion.

corn

corn [noun] (FOOD)

(the seeds of) plants, such as wheat, maize, oats, and barley, that can be used to produce flour

US /kɔːrn/ 
UK /kɔːn/ 

ذرت، بلال‌

مثال: 

a sheaf of corn

Oxford Essential Dictionary

corn

 noun (no plural)

1 (British) the seeds of plants that are grown for their grain, for example wheat

2 American English for maize

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

corn

corn S3 /kɔːn $ kɔːrn/ BrE AmE noun
[Sense 1-2: Language: Old English]
[Sense 3: Date: 1300-1400; Language: Old French; Origin: corne 'horn, corner'; ⇨ ↑corner1]
1. [uncountable] British English plants such as wheat, ↑barley, and ↑oats or their seeds:
fields of corn
an ear of corn (=the top part of this plant where the seeds grow)
2.
[uncountable]
a) American English a tall plant with large yellow seeds that grow together on a ↑cob (=long hard part), which is cooked and eaten as a vegetable or fed to animals SYN maize British English:
All our chickens are fed on corn. ⇨ ↑corn on the cob
b) the seeds of this plant ⇨ ↑sweetcorn
3. [countable] a painful area of thick hard skin on your foot

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

corn

corn [corn corns]   [kɔːn]    [kɔːrn]  noun

1. (BrE) uncountable any plant that is grown for its grain, such as wheat; the grain of these plants
a field of corn
ears/sheaves of corn

• corn-fed chicken

2. (NAmE) (BrE maize) uncountable a tall plant grown for its large yellow grains that are used for making flour or eaten as a vegetable; the grains of this plant

see also  corncob, corn on the cob

 

3. (NAmE) (BrE sweet·corn) uncountable the yellow seeds of a type of corn ( maize ) plant, also called corn, which grow on thick stems and are cooked and eaten as a vegetable

4. countable a small area of hard skin on the foot, especially the toe, that is sometimes painful
See also: maize  sweetcorn  
Word Origin:
senses 1 to 3 Old English Germanic Dutch koren German Korn
sense 4 late Middle English Anglo-Norman French Latin cornu ‘horn’
 
Collocations:
Farming
Growing food and raising animals
plant trees/seeds/crops/vines/barley
grow/produce corn/wheat/rice/fruit
plough/ (NAmE) plow land/a field
sow/harvest seeds/crops/fields
spread manure/fertilizer on sth
cultivate/irrigate/water/contaminate crops/plants/fields/land
damage/destroy/lose your crop
ripen/pick fruit/berries/grapes
press/dry/ferment grapes
grind/thresh grain/corn/wheat
raise/rear/keep chickens/poultry/cattle/pigs
raise/breed/feed/graze livestock/cattle/sheep
kill/slaughter livestock
preserve/smoke/cure/salt meat
Modern farming
run a fish farm/an organic dairy
engage in/be involved in intensive (pig/fish) farming
use/apply (chemical/organic) fertilizer/insecticides/pesticides
begin/do/conduct field trials of GM (= genetically modified) crops
grow/develop GM crops/seeds/plants/foods
fund/invest in genetic engineering/research
improve/increase crop yields
face/suffer from/alleviate food shortages
label food that contains GMOs (= genetically modified organisms)
eliminate/reduce farm subsidies
oppose/be against factory farming/GM food
promote/encourage/support organic/sustainable farming 
Example Bank:
• The corn is still green.

• a field of standing corn

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

corn / kɔːn /   / kɔːrn / noun (FOOD)

B1 [ U ] UK (the seeds of) plants, such as wheat, maize, oats, and barley, that can be used to produce flour:

a sheaf of corn

grains of corn

[ U ] US the seeds of the maize plant, or the plant itself

 

corn / kɔːn /   / kɔːrn / noun [ C ] (AREA OF SKIN)

a small, painful area of hard skin that forms on the foot, especially on the toes

 

corn / kɔːn /   / kɔːrn / noun [ U ] mainly US slang (EMOTION)

something that is old-fashioned, boring, or done to create emotion:

Everyone says it's a great movie, but I think it's just corn.

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

corn

[kɔ͟ː(r)n]
 corns
 1) N-UNCOUNT Corn is used to refer to crops such as wheat and barley. It can also be used to refer to the seeds from these plants. [BRIT]
  ...fields of corn...
  He filled the barn to the roof with corn.(in AM, use grain)
 2) N-UNCOUNT Corn is the same as maize.
  ...rows of corn in an Iowa field.
 3) N-COUNT: usu pl Corns are small, painful areas of hard skin which can form on your foot, especially near your toes.
 4) → See also popcorn, sweetcorn

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

1corn /ˈkoɚn/ noun [noncount]
1 US
a : a tall plant that produces yellow seeds (called kernels) that are eaten as a vegetable, used to produce many food products, and used as food for animals
• driving past fields of corn
- called also (US) Indian corn, maize,
see color picture 
b : the seeds of the corn plant eaten as a vegetable
• a dish of buttered corn
• a can of corn
• We ate corn on the cob. [=kernels still attached to the cob/corncob]
- called also (Brit) sweetcorn,
2 Brit somewhat old-fashioned : a plant (such as wheat or barley) that produces seeds which are used for food also; : the seeds of such a plant : grain
3 US informal : something (such as writing, music, or acting) that is old-fashioned and silly or sentimental : something that is corny
• The movie's humor is pure corn. [=is very corny]

- compare 2corn

product

product [noun] (THING MADE)

something that is made to be sold, usually something that is produced by an industrial process or, less commonly, something that is grown or obtained through farming

US /ˈprɑː.dʌkt/ 
UK /ˈprɒd.ʌkt/ 

محصول، فرآورده

مثال: 

I'm trying to cut down on dairy products.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

product

 noun
something that people make or grow to sell:
The company has just launched a new product.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

product

product S1 W1 /ˈprɒdʌkt $ ˈprɑː-/ BrE AmE noun
[Word Family: noun: ↑produce, ↑producer, ↑product, ↑production, ↑reproduction, ↑productivity; adjective: ↑productive ≠ ↑unproductive, ↑counterproductive, ↑reproductive, ↑reproducible; verb: ↑produce, ↑reproduce; adverb: ↑productively]
[Date: 1400-1500; Language: Latin; Origin: productum, from the past participle of producere; ⇨ ↑produce1]
1. [uncountable and countable] something that is grown or made in a factory in large quantities, usually in order to be sold
agricultural/dairy/software etc products
consumer products such as VCRs
The London factory assembles the finished product.
He works in marketing and product development.
2. the product of something
a) if someone is the product of a particular background or experience, their character is typical of that background or the result of that experience:
Paula was the product of a sheltered middle-class home.
b) if something is the product of a particular situation, process etc, it is the result of that situation or process:
The report was the product of four years’ hard work.
3. [countable] technical the number you get by multiplying two or more numbers in ↑mathematics
4. [countable] something that is produced through a natural or chemical process:
Hemoglobin is a product of red blood cells.
• • •
COLLOCATIONS
■ ADJECTIVES/NOUN + product
a commercial product They help firms turn good ideas into commercial products.
a consumer product (=one that is bought by the public) Demand for consumer products has increased.
household products Do you know what chemicals are in household products such as washing powder and paint?
beauty/hair products She doesn’t buy beauty products that have been tested on animals.
dairy/milk products Some people are allergic to dairy products.
meat products meat products like sausages, pies and burgers
the finished product The quality of the finished product is all-important.
■ product + NOUN
product development The money will be used to fund product development.
a product range/line (=the range of things that a company makes and sells) We want to broaden the company’s product line.
• • •
THESAURUS
product noun [countable] something that is made or produced in large quantities, usually in order to be sold: consumer products such as mobile phones | dairy products
goods noun [plural] things that are produced in order to be sold, especially for use in the home: They sell furniture and other household goods. | electrical goods | white goods (=large electrical goods used in the home such as washing machines and refrigerators)
commodity noun [countable] formal a type of product or raw material that can be bought and sold – used especially about basic food products, metals, and fuels: The decline in prices for agricultural commodities made the economic situation worse. | All metal was a valuable commodity and was rarely wasted.
merchandise noun [uncountable] formal things that are being sold, especially in shops: Customers are not allowed to handle the merchandise. | Sales of books, videos, and other merchandise have increased.
wares noun [plural] written things that are offered for sale, especially in a market or on the street: In the market, the traders began selling their wares. | Merchants brought their wares from all over the world.
export noun [countable often plural] a product that is sent to a foreign country in order to be sold: US exports rose to $11.935 billion. | At the moment, oil is their biggest export.
import noun [countable often plural] goods that are brought from one country into another to be sold there: The UK clothing industry cannot compete with foreign imports on price.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

product

prod·uct [product products]   [ˈprɒdʌkt]    [ˈprɑːdʌkt]  noun
1. countable, uncountable a thing that is grown or produced, usually for sale
dairy/meat/pharmaceutical, etc. products
investment in product development
to launch a new product on to the market
(business) We need new product to sell (= a new range of products).

see also  end product, gross national product

2. countable a thing produced during a natural, chemical or industrial process
• the products of the reaction

see also  by-product, waste product

3. countable ~ of sth a person or thing that is the result of sth

• The child is the product of a broken home.

4. countable, uncountable a cream, jelly or liquid that you put on your hair or skin to make it look better
• This product can be used on wet or dry hair.

• Don't put too much product on your skin.

5. (mathematics) countable a quantity obtained by multiplying one number by another
The product of 21 and 16 is 336.  
Word Origin:
late Middle English (as a mathematical term): from Latin productum ‘something produced’, neuter past participle (used as a noun) of producere ‘bring forth’, from pro- ‘forward’ + ducere ‘to lead’.  
Thesaurus:
product noun C, U
meat/pharmaceutical products
goodsmerchandiseproduce|economics commodity
consumer/industrial products/goods/commodities
household products/goods
sell/market/buy/purchase produce/a product/goods/merchandise/a commodity 
Collocations:
Business
Running a business
buy/acquire/own/sell a company/firm/franchise
set up/establish/ start/start up/launch a business/company
run/operate a business/company/franchise
head/run a firm/department/team
make/secure/win/block a deal
expand/grow/build the business
boost/increase investment/spending/sales/turnover/earnings/exports/trade
increase/expand production/output/sales
boost/maximize production/productivity/efficiency/income/revenue/profit/profitability
achieve/maintain/sustain growth/profitability
cut/reduce/bring down/lower/slash costs/prices
announce/impose/make cuts/cutbacks
Sales and marketing
break into/enter/capture/dominate the market
gain/grab/take/win/boost/lose market share
find/build/create a market for sth
start/launch an advertising/a marketing campaign
develop/launch/promote a product/website
create/generate demand for your product
attract/get/retain/help customers/clients
drive/generate/boost/increase demand/sales
beat/keep ahead of/out-think/outperform the competition
meet/reach/exceed/miss sales targets
Finance
draw up/set/present/agree/approve a budget
keep to/balance/cut/reduce/slash the budget
be/come in below/under/over/within budget
generate income/revenue/profit/funds/business
fund/finance a campaign/a venture/an expansion/spending/a deficit
provide/raise/allocate capital/funds
attract/encourage investment/investors
recover/recoup costs/losses/an investment
get/obtain/offer sb/grant sb credit/a loan
apply for/raise/secure/arrange/provide finance
Failure
lose business/trade/customers/sales/revenue
accumulate/accrue/incur/run up debts
suffer/sustain enormous/heavy/serious losses
face cuts/a deficit/redundancy/bankruptcy
file for/ (NAmE) enter/avoid/escape bankruptcy
(BrE) go into administration/liquidation
liquidate/wind up a company
survive/weather a recession/downturn
propose/seek/block/oppose a merger
launch/make/accept/defeat a takeover bid 
Synonyms:
product
goods commodity merchandise produce
These are all words for things that are produced to be sold.
producta thing that is produced or grown, usually to be sold: to create/develop/launch a new product
goodsthings that are produced to be sold: cotton/leather goods electrical goods
commodity(economics) a product or raw material that can be bought and sold, especially between countries: rice, flour and other basic commodities
merchandise[U] goods that are bought or sold; things that you can buy that are connected with or advertise a particular event or organization: official Olympic merchandise
goods or merchandise?
Choose goods if the emphasis is on what the product is made of or what it is for: leather/household goods. Choose merchandise if the emphasis is less on the product itself and more on its brand or the fact of buying/selling it.
produce[U] things that have been grown or made, especially things connected with farming: We sell only fresh local produce.
consumer/industrial products/goods/commodities
household products/goods
farm products/produce
luxury products/goods/commodities
to sell/market a product/goods/a commodity/merchandise/produce
to export a product/goods/a commodity/merchandise
to buy/purchase a product/goods/a commodity/merchandise/produce 
Example Bank:
Ensure you have adequate product descriptions.
It's hard to find a competing product that is as compelling.
Ken uses the very best styling products for Jessica's fine hair.
Like many of his generation, he was a product of Japan's obsession with technology.
Most companies haven't tested their products on humans yet.
Our research enables companies to customize and tailor products to suit individual tastes.
She is president of product management.
The company is diversifying its product mix to attract new customers.
The group says it will introduce nine new products before the end of the year.
They offer a range of niche products online.
They produce a product that meets the customer's quality requirements.
They put a lot of time and money into packaging products.
This new catalogue showcases our product.
Those who used the products were generally satisfied with the quality.
We are expanding the product line-up.
We are introducing premium products to all our clients.
We are using a lot of outside agencies to help us do product placement.
We have a good product, but it needs to be marketed better.
a wide range of beauty products
agencies giving out promotional products
an athlete who endorses a product
an expensive specialty product
cigarettes and other tobacco products
everyday household products
for those still concerned about product safety
non-toxic cleaning products
products offered by our insurance companies
short product life cycles
the company's flagship product
the company's new product offerings
the manufacture of chocolate from cocoa bean to the finished product
the most successful new product launches of 2003
the people who create and deliver the products and services
the right product in the right place at the right time
We need new product to sell.
• meat/pharmaceutical products

• to create/develop/launch a new product

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

product / ˈprɒd.ʌkt /   / ˈprɑː.dʌkt / noun (THING MADE)

B1 [ C or U ] something that is made to be sold, usually something that is produced by an industrial process or, less commonly, something that is grown or obtained through farming:

They do a range of skin-care products.

The product is so good it sells itself.

I'm trying to cut down on dairy products.

→  See also by-product

a/the product of sth a/the result of something:

A figure like that is usually the product of many hours spent in the gym.

She had a very happy childhood, and I guess her confidence is a product of that.

 

product / ˈprɒd.ʌkt /   / ˈprɑː.dʌkt / noun [ C ] specialized (IN MATHEMATICS)

the result you get when two or more numbers are multiplied together:

The product of 6 and 3 is 18.

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

product

[prɒ̱dʌkt]
 
 products
 1) N-COUNT A product is something that is produced and sold in large quantities, often as a result of a manufacturing process.
  Try to get the best product at the lowest price...
  South Korea's imports of consumer products jumped 33% in this year.
 2) N-COUNT: N of n If you say that someone or something is a product of a situation or process, you mean that the situation or process has had a significant effect in making them what they are.
  We are all products of our time...
  The bank is the product of a 1971 merger of two Japanese banks.

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

product

prod·uct /ˈprɑːˌdʌkt/ noun, pl -ucts
1 : something that is made or grown to be sold or used

[count]

• dairy/software products
• my favorite skin-care products
• The company's newest product is selling well.

[noncount]

• (technical) The company needs to find a way to sell more product.
- often used before another noun
product design/development
- see also gross domestic product, gross national product
2 [count] : something that is the result of a process
• The sap used to make maple syrup is a natural product.
• This book is the product of many years of hard work.
• The finished/end product was a beautiful vase.
- see also by-product, waste product
3 [count] : someone or something that is produced or influenced by a particular environment or experience - + of
• People are often products of their surroundings and upbringing.
• Her politeness is a product of good parenting.
• My grandfather was a product of his times. [=my grandfather was like other people who grew up with him]
4 [count] mathematics : the number that is the result of multiplying two or more numbers
• 15 is the product of 3 and 5.

shrimp

shrimp [noun] (ANIMAL)

a small sea creature with a thin shell, ten legs, and a long tail, or its flesh eaten as food

US /ʃrɪmp/ 
UK /ʃrɪmp/ 

میگو

مثال: 

shrimp paste

Oxford Essential Dictionary

shrimp

 noun

1 (British) a small sea animal with a shell and a lot of legs that turns pink when you cook it. Shrimps are smaller than prawns.

2 American English for prawn

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

shrimp

shrimp /ʃrɪmp/ BrE AmE noun (plural shrimp or shrimps) [countable]

1. a small sea creature that you can eat, which has ten legs and a soft shell SYN prawn British English
2. someone who is very small – used humorously

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

shrimp

shrimp [shrimp shrimps shrimped shrimping]   [ʃrɪmp]    [ʃrɪmp]  noun

(pl. shrimps or shrimp)

1. a small shellfish that can be eaten, like a prawn but smaller. Shrimps turn pink when cooked.

2. (NAmE) =  prawn
grilled shrimp  
Word Origin:

Middle English: probably related to Middle Low German schrempen ‘to wrinkle’, Middle High German schrimpfen ‘to contract’, also to scrimp.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

shrimp / ʃrɪmp / noun [ C or U ] ( plural shrimps or shrimp ) ( UK also prawn ) (ANIMAL)

B1 a small sea creature with a thin shell, ten legs, and a long tail, or its flesh eaten as food:

shrimp paste

 

shrimp / ʃrɪmp / noun [ C ] ( plural shrimps ) informal disapproving (PERSON)

an extremely short person

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

shrimp

[ʃrɪ̱mp]
 shrimps
 N-COUNT
 (shrimp can also be used as the plural form.)
 Shrimps are small shellfish with long tails and many legs.
  Add the shrimp and cook for 30 seconds...
  I'm going to have shrimps for my tea.
 Syn:
 prawn

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

shrimp

shrimp /ˈʃrɪmp/ noun, pl shrimp or shrimps [count]
1 : a small shellfish that has a long body and legs and that is eaten as food - see color picture
- compare prawn
2 informal : a very small or unimportant person
• He's a little shrimp of a boy.

live

live [adjective] (AS IT HAPPENS)

(of a performance) broadcast, recorded, or seen while it is happening

US /laɪv/ 
UK /laɪv/ 

زنده

مثال: 

This evening there will be a live broadcast of the debate.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

live

 adjective

1 not dead:
Have you ever touched a real live snake?

2 If a radio or television programme is live, you see or hear it at the same time as it happens:
The match is going out live on TV.

3 with electricity passing through it:
Don't touch that wire – it's live!

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

II. live2 S3 W3 /laɪv/ BrE AmE adjective
[Word Family: verb: ↑live, ↑outlive, ↑relive, ↑liven, ↑up; adjective: ↑live, ↑lively, ↑living, ↑liveable; noun: ↑liveliness, ↑living, ↑livelihood; adverb: ↑live]
[Date: 1500-1600; Origin: alive]
1. LIVING [only before noun] not dead or artificial SYN living OPP dead:
experiments on live animals
Protesters want to stop the export of live sheep and cattle.
the number of live births per 1,000 population
We were so excited to see real live elephants.
2. TV/RADIO a live television or radio programme is seen or heard on television or radio at the same time as it is actually happening OPP prerecorded:
a live radio phone-in show
There will be live TV coverage of tonight’s big match.
3. MUSIC/THEATRE a live performance is one in which the entertainer performs for people who are watching, rather than a film, record etc:
A lot of the bars have live music.
The band will be giving a live concert performance next week.
We’ll be playing you a track from his new live album (=↑album that was recorded from a live performance).
It’s always different when you perform in front of a live audience (=an audience watching a live performance).
4. ELECTRICITY a wire or piece of equipment that is live has electricity flowing through it:
Be careful – those wires are live.
5. BOMBS a live bomb still has the power to explode because it has not been used:
They came across a field of live, unexploded mines.
6. BULLETS live bullets are real ones that are made of metal and can kill people OPP blank:
Troops fired live ammunition to disperse the crowd.
7. ISSUE a live subject or problem is one that still interests or worries people:
Drink-driving is still very much a live issue.
8. live coals pieces of coal that are burning:
She threw the paper onto the live coals.
9. YOGHURT live ↑yoghurt contains ↑bacteria that are still alive
III. live3 /laɪv/ BrE AmE adverb
[Word Family: verb: ↑live, ↑outlive, ↑relive, ↑liven, ↑up; adjective: ↑live, ↑lively, ↑living, ↑liveable; noun: ↑liveliness, ↑living, ↑livelihood; adverb: ↑live]
1. if something is broadcast live, it is broadcast on television or radio as it is actually happening ⇨ prerecorded:
The ceremony will be broadcast live on television.
The match will be shown live by the BBC.
2. if people perform live, they perform in front of people who have come to watch, rather than for a film, record etc:
I love their music, but I’ve never seen them perform live.
The band is playing live in Birmingham tonight.
Their latest CD was recorded live (=recorded at a live performance) in New York.
3. go live when a system or project goes live, people start to use it after it has been planned and discussed for a long time:
Their new information retrieval system went live last month.
a new security project which will go live in October

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

▪ II. live 2 [live lives lived living] adjective, adverb   [laɪv]    [laɪv] 

see also  live1

adjective usually before noun  

NOT DEAD
1. living; not dead
live animals
the number of live births (= babies born alive)

• We saw a real live rattlesnake!  

 

NOT RECORDED

2. (of a broadcast) sent out while the event is actually happening, not recorded first and broadcast later

• live coverage of the World Cup

3. (of a performance) given or made when people are watching, not recorded
The club has live music most nights.
a live recording made at Wembley Arena
• the band's new live album

• It was the first interview I'd done in front of a live audience (= with people watching).  

 

ELECTRICITY

4. (of a wire or device) connected to a source of electrical power

• That terminal is live.  

 

BULLETS/MATCHES

5. still able to explode or light; ready for use

• live ammunition  

 

COALS

 

6. live coals are burning or are still hot and red  

YOGURT

7. live yogurt still contains the bacteria needed to turn milk into yogurt  

QUESTION/SUBJECT
8. of interest or importance at the present time

• Pollution is still very much a live issue.  

 

INTERNET

9. (of an electronic link) functioning correctly, so that it is connected to another document or page on the Internet
Here are some live links to other aviation-related web pages.  
Word Origin:
mid 16th cent. alive
 
Example Bank:
I can watch the games live on TV.
This programme comes to you live from the Albert Hall.
In those days the broadcasts all went out live.
Is the show live or recorded?
Later we'll talk live with the former New York police commissioner.
The CD was recorded live at a concert given last year.
The band have never played this song live before.
The game will be televised live this evening.
The new website is expected to go live in October.
The show was filmed live at the Arena.
The show will air live on June 10.
The trial was carried live on a Chicago radio station.
This concert comes to you live from Carnegie Hall.
We'll be reporting live from Beijing.
Customs officials seized 400 live snakes packed in crates.
I need to talk to a live person.
The victim's pockets were full of live ammunition.
• the number of live births

Idioms: go live  live wire 

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

live / laɪv / adjective (AS IT HAPPENS)

B1 (of a performance) broadcast, recorded, or seen while it is happening:

This evening there will be a live broadcast of the debate.

a live recording

 

live / laɪv / adjective [ before noun ] (HAVING LIFE)

having life:

Millions of live animals are shipped around the world each year.

There was a tank of live lobsters in the restaurant.

 

live / laɪv / adjective (ELECTRICITY)

(of a wire) carrying or charged with electricity:

a live wire

 

live / laɪv / adjective (ABLE TO EXPLODE)

able to explode:

live rounds of ammunition

live shells

 

live / laɪv / adjective (BURNING)

(of a fire, coals, or a match) still burning or able to burn:

There are live coals in the fireplace.

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

live

I VERB USES
 

 lives, living, lived

 (Pronounced [lɪ̱v] in live 1, and [la͟ɪv] in live 2.)
 1) VERB If someone lives in a particular place or with a particular person, their home is in that place or with that person.
  [V adv/prep] She has lived here for 10 years...
  [V adv/prep] She always said I ought to live alone...
  [V adv/prep] Where do you live?...
  [V adv/prep] He still lives with his parents.
 2) VERB If you say that someone lives in particular circumstances or that they live a particular kind of life, you mean that they are in those circumstances or that they have that kind of life.
  [V adv/prep] We lived quite grandly...
  [V adv/prep] Compared to people living only a few generations ago, we have greater opportunities to have a good time...
  [V n] We can start living a normal life again now.
  [V-ing] ...the local support group for people living with HIV and AIDS.
 3) VERB If you say that someone lives for a particular thing, you mean that it is the most important thing in their life.
  [V for n] He lived for his work.
 4) VERB To live means to be alive. If someone lives to a particular age, they stay alive until they are that age.
  [V adv] He's got a terrible disease and will not live long...
  [V adv] A perennial is a plant that lives indefinitely...
  [V to-inf] He lived to be 103...
  [V to-inf] My father died nigh on ten years ago, but he lived to see his first grandson...
  [V to n] Matilda was born in northern Italy in 1046 and apparently lived to a ripe old age...
  [V-ing] The blue whale is the largest living thing on the planet...
  [V-ing] Ian was her only living relative.
 5) VERB: no cont If people live by doing a particular activity, they get the money, food, or clothing they need by doing that activity.
  [V by -ing/n] ...the last indigenous people to live by hunting...
  [V by -ing/n] These crimes were committed largely by professional criminals who lived by crime.
 6) VERB If you live by a particular rule, belief, or ideal, you behave in the way in which it says you should behave.
  [V by n] They live by the principle that we are here to add what we can to life, not to get what we want from it.
 7) VERB: no cont If a person or occasion lives in someone's mind or in history, they are remembered for a long time.
  [V with n] The memory of that will live with me for many years to come...
  [V in n] His name will live in history as one of the greatest bowlers of all time...
 PHRASAL VERB
 Live on means the same as live. Also V P V P in n Lenin lives on in the minds and hearts of millions of people.
 8) → See also living
 9) PHRASE: Vs inflect, PHR n (emphasis) If you say that someone lives and breathes a particular subject or activity, you are emphasizing that they are extremely enthusiastic about it.
  He has lived and breathed polo since he was seven.
 10) PHRASE: have inflects, usu PHR with cl If you tell someone that they haven't lived unless they experience a particular thing, you are telling them that thing is extremely good and should be experienced.
  If you have never been to an opera, you haven't lived...
  You haven't lived until you've used their new micro system.
 11) PHRASE: V inflects, usu PHR of -ing/n You can use expressions such as to live in fear and to live in terror to indicate that someone is always thinking about an unpleasant or frightening event, because they think that it might happen.
  One in 10 Californians is unemployed and thousands more live in fear of losing their jobs.
 12) CONVENTION You say live and let live as a way of saying that you should let other people behave in the way that they want to and not criticize them for behaving differently from you.
 13) PHRASE: V inflects If you live it up, you have a very enjoyable and exciting time, for example by going to lots of parties or going out drinking with friends. [INFORMAL]
  There is no reason why you couldn't live it up once in a while.
 14) to live hand to mouthsee hand
 to live a liesee lie
 to live beyond your meanssee means
 to live in sinsee sin
  Phrasal Verbs:
  - live down
  - live off
  - live on
  - live off
  - live on
  - live out
  - live through
  - live together
  - live up toII ADJECTIVE USES
 ♦♦♦

 (Pronounced [lɪ̱v] in live 1, and [la͟ɪv] in live 2.)
 1) ADJ: ADJ n Live animals or plants are alive, rather than being dead or artificial.
  ...a protest against the company's tests on live animals.
  ...baskets of live chickens.
  Ant:
  dead
 2) ADJ A live television or radio programme is one in which an event or performance is broadcast at exactly the same time as it happens, rather than being recorded first.
  Murray was a guest on a live radio show.
  ...we were laughing and gossiping, oblivious to the fact that we were on live TV...
  They watch all the live matches...
  A broadcast of the speech was heard in San Francisco, but it is not known if this was live.
  Ant:
  pre-recorded
 ADV: ADV after v
 Live is also an adverb. It was broadcast live in 50 countries... We'll be going live to Nottingham later in this bulletin.
 3) ADJ: usu ADJ n A live performance is given in front of an audience, rather than being recorded and then broadcast or shown in a film.
  The Rainbow has not hosted live music since the end of 1981...
  A live audience will pose the questions...
  The band was forced to cancel a string of live dates.
  Ant:
  recorded
 ADV: ADV after v
 Live is also an adverb. Kat Bjelland has been playing live with her new band.
 4) ADJ: usu ADJ n A live recording is a recording of a band playing at a concert, rather than in a studio.
  This is my favourite live album of all time...
  The LP features live recordings from the `Great Xpectations' all-day show.
 5) ADJ: usu ADJ n A live wire or piece of electrical equipment is directly connected to a source of electricity.
  The plug broke, exposing live wires...
  He warned others about the live electric cables as they climbed to safety.
 6) ADJ: usu ADJ n Live bullets are made of metal, rather than rubber or plastic, and are intended to kill people rather than injure them.
  They trained in the jungle using live ammunition.
 7) ADJ: usu ADJ n A live bomb or missile is one which has not yet exploded.
  A live bomb had earlier been defused.
 8) PHRASE: V inflects If a system, campaign, or other course of action goes live, it starts to be used. [mainly BRIT]
  The new system went live earlier this year...
  The service should go live this summer.
 9) PHRASE: PHR n You use real live to say that someone or something is present or exists, when you want to indicate that you think this is exciting and unusual or unexpected. [INFORMAL]
  He had never met a real live admiral...
  She has the best pet of all - a real live tiger.

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

2live /ˈlaɪv/ adj
1 a always used before a noun : having life : living or alive
• They object to the use of live animals in scientific experiments.
• a live birth [=a birth of a living child or animal]
b informal : not imaginary : actually existing - used in the phrase real live
• Everyone was excited about seeing a real live celebrity. [=an actual celebrity]
2 a : done in front of an audience : of or involving a play, concert, etc., that is performed in front of people
• a nightclub with live music/entertainment
• The group has just released a live album. [=an album made by recording a performance before an audience]
b : watching a performance as it happens
• a television program filmed before a live (studio) audience
c : broadcast while a performance, event, etc., is happening : not recorded earlier
• a live television/radio program
• She was nervous about being interviewed on live radio.
• The network is providing live coverage of the debate.
3 : carrying an electric current : connected to electric power
• Use caution when you are working near live electrical wires.
• a live microphone
- see also live wire
4 always used before a noun
a : carrying a charge and capable of exploding or being shot
• a live bomb
live ammunition
• We had thought the guns were loaded with blanks, but the soldiers were actually shooting live bullets.
b : burning without a flame : glowing
live coals
5 : not yet decided or settled : still causing discussion, disagreement, or concern
• a live issue
• a live controversy
6 US sports : still in play
• The ball is live until it goes out of bounds.
7 Brit of yogurt : containing living bacteria
• We sell live yogurt.

create

create [verb] (MAKE)

to make something new, or invent something

US /kriˈeɪt/ 
UK /kriˈeɪt/ 

ايجاد كردن‌، به‌ وجود آوردن‌

مثال: 

Charles Schulz created the characters 'Snoopy' and 'Charlie Brown'.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

create

 verb (creates, creating, created)
to make something happen or exist:
Do you believe that God created the world?
The government plans to create more jobs for young people.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

create

create S2 W1 AC /kriˈeɪt/ BrE AmE verb [transitive]
[Word Family: noun: ↑creation, ↑creativity, ↑creator, ↑creativeness; verb: ↑create, ↑recreate; adverb: ↑creatively; adjective: ↑creative ≠ UNCREATIVE]
[Date: 1300-1400; Language: Latin; Origin: past participle of creare]
1. to make something exist that did not exist before:
Some people believe the universe was created by a big explosion.
Her behaviour is creating a lot of problems.
The new factory is expected to create more than 400 new jobs.
2. to invent or design something:
This dish was created by our chef Jean Richard.
Philip Glass created a new kind of music.
The software makes it easy to create colourful graphs.
3. create somebody something British English to officially give someone a special rank or title:
James I created him Duke of Buckingham.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

create

cre·ate AW [create creates created creating]   [kriˈeɪt]    [kriˈeɪt]  verb
1. ~ sth to make sth happen or exist
Scientists disagree about how the universe was created.
The main purpose of industry is to create wealth.
The government plans to create more jobs for young people.
• Create a new directory and put all your files into it.

• Try this new dish, created by our head chef.

2. ~ sth to produce a particular feeling or impression
The company is trying to create a young energetic image.
The announcement only succeeded in creating confusion.
• The reorganization has created a lot of bad feeling.

• They've painted it red to create a feeling of warmth.

3. to give sb a particular rank or title
~ sth The government has created eight new peers.
~ sth + noun He was created a baronet in 1715.
Verb forms:
 
Word Origin:
late Middle English (in the sense ‘form out of nothing’, used of a divine or supernatural being): from Latin creat- ‘produced’, from the verb creare.  
Thesaurus:
create verb
1. T
There are lots of different myths about how the world was created.
We need to create more jobs for young people.
makeproduceformbuildgeneratedevelopmanufacture|especially spoken do
Opp: destroy
create/make/produce/form/build/generate/develop/manufacture sth from/out of sth
create/make/produce/do a drawing/painting
create/produce/generate income/profits/wealth
Create or make? Make is a more general word, used especially for physical objects
make a table/dress/cake
create jobs/wealth
Use create to emphasize how unusual or original sth is
a new dish, created by our chef
2. T
The news created widespread confusion.
causeproducestimulatearouseresult in sthlead to sthbring sth aboutprovokeprompt|formal give rise to sth
create/cause/produce/stimulate/arouse/result in/lead to/provoke/prompt/give rise to speculation
create/cause/produce/result in/lead to/provoke/give rise to problems
create/cause/arouse/lead to/provoke/give rise to resentment  
Synonyms:
make
do create develop produce generate form
These words all mean to make sth from parts or materials, or to cause sth to exist or happen.
maketo create or prepare sth by combining materials or putting parts together; to cause sth to exist or happen: She makes her own clothes. She made a good impression on the interviewer.
do(rather informal) to make or prepare sth, especially sth artistic or sth to eat: He did a beautiful drawing of a house. Who's doing the food for the party?
createto make sth exist or happen, especially sth new that did not exist before: Scientists disagree about how the universe was created.
make or create?
Make is a more general word and is more often used for physical things: you would usually make a table/dress/cake but create jobs/wealth. You can use create for sth physical in order to emphasize how original or unusual the object is: Try this new dish, created by our head chef.
develop(used especially in business contexts) to think of and produce a new product: to develop new software
produceto make things to be sold; to create sth using skill: a factory that produces microchips
generateto produce or create sth, especially power, money or ideas: to generate electricity Brainstorming is a good way of generating ideas.
form[often passive] to make sth from sth else; to make sth into sth else: Rearrange the letters to form a new word. The chain is formed from 136 links.
to make/create/develop/produce/generate/form sth from/out of sth
to make/form sth into sth
to make/produce wine
to create/develop a new product
to create/produce/generate income/profits/wealth

to produce/generate electricity/heat/power

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

create / kriˈeɪt / verb [ T ] (MAKE)

B1 to make something new, or invent something:

Charles Schulz created the characters 'Snoopy' and 'Charlie Brown'.

The Bible says that God created the world.

He created a wonderful meal from very few ingredients.

It's important to create a good impression when you meet a new client.

 

create / kriˈeɪt / verb [ I ] UK old-fashioned (BE ANGRY)

to show that you are angry:

If she sees you with an ice cream she'll only start creating.

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

create

[krie͟ɪt]
 
 creates, creating, created
 1) VERB To create something means to cause it to happen or exist.
  [V n] We set business free to create more jobs in Britain...
  [V n] She could create a fight out of anything...
  [V n] The lights create such a glare it's next to impossible to see anything behind them...
  [V n] Criticizing will only destroy a relationship and create feelings of failure.
  Syn:
  produce
  Ant:
  destroy
  Derived words:
  creation [krie͟ɪʃ(ə)n] N-UNCOUNT usu N of n These businesses stimulate the creation of local jobs... The creation of large parks and forests is of lower priority than some twenty years ago.
 2) VERB When someone creates a new product or process, they invent it or design it.
  [V n] It is really great for a radio producer to create a show like this...
  [V n] He's creating a whole new language of painting.
  Syn:
  invent

 

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

create

cre·ate /kriˈeɪt/ verb -ates; -at·ed; -at·ing [+ obj]
1 : to make or produce (something) : to cause (something new) to exist
• Several new government programs were created while she was governor.
• The President has announced a plan to create new jobs.
• the scientists who created the world's first atomic bomb
• The machine creates a lot of noise.
• According to the Bible, the world was created [=made] in six days.
2 : to cause (a particular situation) to exist
• You created [=made, caused] this mess, and now you'll have to fix it.
• We need everyone's help in creating [=developing] a better society.
• It can be hard to create a balance between work and family.
• She creates a friendly and welcoming atmosphere for her guests.
• The advertisements are intended to create demand for the product.
3 : to produce (something new, such as a work of art) by using your talents and imagination
• He creates beautiful paintings.
• I've been creating music for over 30 years.
• She enjoys creating new dishes by combining unusual ingredients.
4 chiefly Brit : to give (someone) a new title or rank
• She was created (the) Duchess of Cornwall.

exist

exist [verb] (BE)

to be, or to be real

US /ɪɡˈzɪst/ 
UK /ɪɡˈzɪst/ 

وجود داشتن‌، بودن‌

مثال: 

I don't think ghosts exist.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

exist

 verb (exists, existing, existed)
to be real; to live:
Does life exist on other planets?
That word does not exist.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

exist

exist S2 W1 /ɪɡˈzɪst/ BrE AmE verb [intransitive not in progressive]
[Word Family: noun: ↑existence ≠ ↑non-existence, ↑existent, ↑existentialism, ↑existentialist, ↑coexistence; adjective: ↑existent ≠ ↑nonexistent, ↑existing, ↑pre-existing, ↑existential, ↑existentialist; verb: ↑exist, ↑coexist]
[Date: 1600-1700; Language: Latin; Origin: exsistere 'to come into being, exist', from sistere 'to stand']
1. to happen or be present in a particular situation or place:
The custom of arranged marriages still exists in many countries.
Opportunities exist for students to gain sponsorship.
Stop pretending that the problem doesn’t exist.
The club will cease to exist if financial help is not found.
2. to be real or alive:
Do fairies really exist?
Tom acts as if I don’t exist at times.
3. to stay alive, especially in a difficult situation when you do not have enough money, food etc SYN survive
exist on
The hostages existed on bread and water.
• • •
COLLOCATIONS
■ adverbs
really/actually exist Do you think ghosts really exist?
already exist Legislation to protect us from terrorists already exists.
currently exist No treaty currently exists between the two countries.
still exist (=existing in the past and continuing to exist) A number of his early photographs still exist.
■ verbs
continue to exist We all hope the human race will continue to exist for millions of years.
cease to exist (=stop existing) Many of these companies will cease to exist in five years' time.
be known to exist Seven copies of the original book are still known to exist.
■ phrases
the right to exist The president issued a statement recognizing Kosovo's right to exist.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

exist

exist [exist exists existed existing]   [ɪɡˈzɪst]    [ɪɡˈzɪst]  verb
1. intransitive (not used in the progressive tenses) to be real; to be present in a place or situation
Does life exist on other planets?
The problem only exists in your head, Jane.
Few of these monkeys still exist in the wild.
On his retirement the post will cease to exist.

• The charity exists to support victims of crime.

2. intransitive ~ (on sth) to live, especially in a difficult situation or with very little money
We existed on a diet of rice.
They can't exist on the money he's earning.
Verb forms:

 
Word Origin:
early 17th cent.: probably a back-formation from existence.  
Thesaurus:
exist verb I (not used in the progressive tenses)
Do these creatures still exist in the wild?
be foundliveoccur|formal prevail
exist/be found/occur/prevail in/among sth
still exist/be found/occur/prevail
never exist/be found/occur 
Example Bank:
He argued that ideas do not exist independently of the language that expresses them.
I didn't think people like that existed any more.
The technology did not yet exist.
They appear to exist in significant numbers.
a species with only about a thousand believed to exist in the wild
companies that exist solely for the purpose of mortgage lending
the enormous volcanoes now known to exist on Mars
• A temple existed here hundreds of years ago.

• The problem only exists in your head, Ben.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

exist / ɪɡˈzɪst / verb [ I ] (BE)

B1 to be, or to be real:

I don't think ghosts exist.

Poverty still exists in this country

 

exist / ɪɡˈzɪst / verb [ I ] (LIVE)

C1 to live, or to live in difficult conditions:

Some species exist in this small area of forest and nowhere else on Earth.

Few people can exist without water for more than a week.

No one can be expected to exist on such a low salary.

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

exist

[ɪgzɪ̱st]
 exists, existing, existed
 1) VERB: no cont If something exists, it is present in the world as a real thing.
  He thought that if he couldn't see something, it didn't exist...
  Research opportunities exist in a wide range of pure and applied areas of entomology...
  [there V n] When Alfred Adler first postulated in 1908 that there existed an inborn instinct of aggression Freud argued against it.
 2) VERB To exist means to live, especially under difficult conditions or with very little food or money.
  I exist from one visit to the next...
  I was barely existing.
  [V on n] ...the problems of having to exist on unemployment benefit.

 

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

exist

ex·ist /ɪgˈzɪst/ verb -ists; -ist·ed; -ist·ing [no obj]
1 : to have actual being : to be real
• She believes that ghosts really do exist.
• It's the largest galaxy known to exist.
• Does life exist on Mars?
• The Internet didn't exist then.
• Those ideas only exist in your mind. [=they are only in your mind]
• We shouldn't ignore the problems that exist in our own community.
2 : to continue to be or to live
• as long as doubt exists [=persists]
• Racism still exists in our society.
• The organization may soon cease to exist if more funding isn't provided.
• We cannot exist [=live] without oxygen.
• They exist [=survive, subsist] on a diet of fruit, nuts, and leaves.
- existing adj
• ignore existing problems
• making changes to the existing structure [=the structure that is there now]

lamb

lamb [noun]

a young sheep, or the flesh of a young sheep eaten as meat

US /læm/ 
UK /læm/ 

بره، گوشت بره

مثال: 

lambs gambolling about in the fields

Oxford Essential Dictionary

lamb

 noun

1 (plural lambs)

pronunciation
The word lamb sounds like ham, because we don't say the letter b in this word.

a young sheep

2 (no plural) meat from a lamb:
We had roast lamb for lunch.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

lamb

I. lamb1 S3 /læm/ BrE AmE noun
[Language: Old English]
1.
[countable] a young sheep
2. [uncountable] the meat of a young sheep ⇨ mutton:
roast lamb
a leg of lamb
lamb chop/cutlet/stew etc
3. [countable] spoken used to talk to or talk about someone who is gentle and lovable, especially a child:
Ben’s asleep now, the little lamb.
4. like a lamb to the slaughter used when someone is going to do something dangerous, but they do not realize it or have no choice
5. like a lamb quietly and without any argument:
Suzie went off to school like a lamb today.
mutton dressed as lamb at ↑mutton(2)

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

lamb

lamb [lamb lambs lambed lambing] noun, verb   [læm]    [læm] 

noun

1. countable a young sheep

2. uncountable meat from a young sheep
a leg of lamb
• lamb chops

compare  mutton

3. countable (informal) used to describe or address sb with affection or pity
You poor lamb!
more at mutton dressed as lamb at  mutton, (you, etc.) may/might as well be hanged/hung for a sheep as (for) a lamb at  well  adv.  
Word Origin:
Old English, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch lam and German Lamm.  
Example Bank:
• the traffic in illegally slaughtered lamb

Idiom: lamb to the slaughter

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

lamb / læm / noun [ C or U ]

B1 a young sheep, or the flesh of a young sheep eaten as meat:

lambs gambolling about in the fields

lamb chops

roast lamb

→  See also mutton

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

lamb

[læ̱m]
 lambs
 1) N-COUNT A lamb is a young sheep.
 N-UNCOUNT
 Lamb is the flesh of a lamb eaten as food. Laura was basting the leg of lamb.
 2) N-COUNT (feelings) People sometimes use lamb when they are addressing or referring to someone who they are fond of and who is young, gentle, or unfortunate.
  She came and put her arms around me. `You poor lamb. What's wrong?'
 3) PHRASE: lamb inflects, PHR after v If you say that people do something like lambs or like lambs to the slaughter, you mean that they do what someone wants them to do without complaining or fighting.
  The pair surrendered to him like lambs...
  We follow their every word like lambs to the slaughter.
 4) mutton dressed as lambsee mutton

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

1lamb /ˈlæm/ noun, pl lambs
1 a [count] : a young sheep
• She's as gentle as a lamb.
• a sacrificial lamb
- compare ewe, 1ram
b [noncount] : the meat of a lamb
• leg/rack of lamb
lamb chops
2 [count] informal : an innocent, weak, or gentle person
• You poor lamb.
like a lamb to the slaughter : in a very innocent way : without knowing that something bad will happen
• He walked into the meeting like a lamb to the slaughter.
mutton dressed as lamb
- see mutton

broccoli

broccoli [noun]

a vegetable with a thick green stem and a dark green top

US /ˈbrɑː.kəl.i/ 
UK /ˈbrɒk.əl.i/ 

بروکلی، گل کلم ایتالیایی

Oxford Essential Dictionary

broccoli

 noun (no plural)
a vegetable with green or purple flowers that you eat

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

broccoli

broccoli /ˈbrɒkəli $ ˈbrɑː-/ BrE AmE noun [uncountable]
[Date: 1600-1700; Language: Italian; Origin: plural of broccolo, from brocco 'small nail', from Latin broccus; ⇨ ↑brooch]
a green vegetable that has short branch-like stems

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

broccoli

broc·coli   [ˈbrɒkəli]    [ˈbrɑːkəli]  noun

uncountable
a vegetable with a thick green stem and several dark green or purple flower heads 
Word Origin:

[broccoli] mid 17th cent.: from Italian, plural of broccolo ‘cabbage sprout, head’, diminutive of brocco ‘shoot’, based on Latin brocchus, broccus ‘projecting’.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

broccoli / ˈbrɒk. ə l.i /   / ˈbrɑː.k ə l- / noun [ U ]

broccoli

B1 a vegetable with a thick green stem and a dark green top

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

broccoli

[brɒ̱kəli]
 N-UNCOUNT
 Broccoli is a vegetable with green stalks and green or purple tops.

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

broccoli

broc·co·li /ˈbrɑːkəli/ noun [noncount] : a common vegetable that has green branches and many small green or purple flowers - see color picture

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