B2 (Upper-intermediate)

turn someone off

turn someone off [idiom]

To displease someone; make someone detest something greatly (can have sexual or physical implications)

Example: 

Martha really turned me off when she ate salad with her unwashed hands. It was really disgusting the way she picked cucumbers with her fingernails!

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

urn-off 4 turn somebody ↔ off to make someone decide they do not like something :

Any prospective buyer will be turned off by the sight of rotting wood.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

turn sb off informal — phrasal verb with turn / tɜːn /   / tɝːn / verb

to stop someone feeling interested or excited, especially sexually:

I should think the smell of her breath would turn any man off.

© Cambridge University Press 2013

realistic

realistic [adjective]

accepting things as they are in fact and not making decisions based on unlikely hopes for the future

US /ˌriː.əˈlɪs.tɪk/ 
UK /ˌrɪəˈlɪs.tɪk/ 
Example: 

Let's be realistic (about this) - I just can't afford to pay that much money.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

realistic

 adjective
sensible and accepting what is possible in a particular situation:
We have to be realistic about our chances of winning.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

realistic

realistic S3 /rɪəˈlɪstɪk/ BrE AmE adjective
[Word Family: noun: ↑realism, ↑realist, ↑reality, ↑unreality, ↑realization; adverb: ↑real, ↑really, ↑realistically ≠ ↑unrealistically; adjective: ↑real, ↑unreal, ↑realistic ≠ ↑unrealistic; verb: ↑realize]
1. judging and dealing with situations in a practical way according to what is actually possible rather than what you would like to happen OPP unrealistic
it is not realistic to do something
It’s just not realistic to expect a promotion so soon.
realistic about
You need to be realistic about the amount you can do in a day.
2. a realistic aim or hope is something that it is possible to achieve OPP unrealistic:
Is this a realistic target?
I don’t think they have a realistic chance of winning.
3. realistic pictures or stories show things as they are in real life:
a realistic portrayal of life in Victorian Britain

COLLOCATIONS (for Meaning 2)
■ nouns
a realistic chance/prospect We felt we had a realistic chance of beating England.
a realistic option/alternative We do not believe there is any realistic alternative.
a realistic goal/target Set realistic goals for yourself.
a realistic expectation There are no realistic expectations of improvement.
a realistic figure/price A more realistic figure for energy saving would be 20 percent.
a realistic solution Compromise is the only realistic solution.

THESAURUS
possible if something is possible, it can be done or achieved: I think it’s possible that we could win the race. | I want to get back by 5 o'clock if possible. | Please let me know your answer as soon as possible.
feasible if an idea or plan is feasible, it is possible and you can find a practical way of doing it: We need to find out first if the idea is technically feasible. | It is not feasible to have security cameras in every part of the building. | Da Silva considered it feasible that uranium could be produced on an industrial scale.
viable possible and likely to be successful, and therefore worth doing: Nuclear energy is the only viable alternative to coal or gas. | The product needs to be commercially viable. | We have yet to find a viable solution to the problem. | The company was no longer financially viable (=it could not make enough money to be able to continue).
workable a workable plan, system, or solution is one that can be done or used: By early morning, they had arrived at a workable and safe solution. | The company would have a tough job convincing people that the deal was workable.
doable informal if something is doable, you have enough money, energy, or skill to do it: This exercise programme is doable for most people. | Do you think the walk is doable? | Hosting great parties is fun, easy, and doable on any budget. | The book is full of interesting and doable recipes.
achievable (also attainable formal) able to be achieved: A 15% cut in carbon emissions is achievable. | Perfect democracy is not attainable, nor is perfect freedom or perfect justice.
realistic if something is realistic, it seems sensible to think that it can be done or achieved: a realistic target | Their expectations didn’t seem very realistic. | It is important to set yourself realistic goals.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

realistic

real·is·tic   [ˌriːəˈlɪstɪk]    [ˌrɪəˈlɪstɪk]    [ˌriːəˈlɪstɪk]  adjective
1. accepting in a sensible way what it is actually possible to do or achieve in a particular situation
a realistic assessment
We have to be realistic about our chances of winning.

• It is not realistic to expect people to spend so much money.

2. sensible and appropriate; possible to achieve
Syn:  feasible, Syn: viable
We must set realistic goals.
• a realistic target

• to pay a realistic salary

3. representing things as they are in real life
a realistic drawing
We try to make these training courses as realistic as possible.
realistic graphics
Opp:  unrealistic  
Thesaurus:
realistic [realistic] adj.
1. (usually approving)
We have to be realistic about our chances.
no-nonsensematter-of-fact|usually approving pragmaticpracticaldown-to-earthlevel-headed
Opp: unrealistic
realistic/matter-of-fact/pragmatic/practical/down-to-earth about sth
a realistic/non-nonsense/matter-of-fact/pragmatic/practical/down-to-earth/level-headed approach
a realistic/pragmatic/practical solution
2.
We must set realistic goals.
possibleachievablefeasiblepracticalworkable|especially business viable
Opp: unrealistic
be realistic/possible/feasible to do sth
a realistic/feasible/practical/workable/viable solution/policy/plan
a realistic/an achievable goal/objective/target
3.
a realistic drawing of a horse
authenticlifelike
look realistic/authentic/lifelike 
Example Bank:
He was realistic enough to know this success could not last.
It's not realistic to expect people to pay more.
My friends were quite realistic about my problems.
The special effects seem very realistic.
Try to keep your ambitions realistic.
You could make the hands a little more realistic.
You're not being very realistic in your expectations.
beautifully drawn, highly realistic flowers
being very realistic in their expectations
his grimly realistic first novel about drug addicts
If you want to retain good employees, you have to pay a realistic salary.
She made a very realistic drawing of a horse.
The realistic graphics really bring the game to life.
• This report takes a much more realistic view of the situation.

• a realistic alternative/demand/estimate/goal/hope/option/plan/solution/target

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

realistic / ˌrɪəˈlɪs.tɪk /   / ˌriː.ə- / adjective

B2 accepting things as they are in fact and not making decisions based on unlikely hopes for the future:

Let's be realistic ( about this) - I just can't afford to pay that much money.

It isn't realistic to expect people to work for so little money.

→  See also Realpolitik

B2 seeming to exist or be happening in fact:

The special effects were so realistic.

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

realistic

[ri͟ːəlɪ̱stɪk]
 1) ADJ-GRADED: usu v-link ADJ, oft ADJ about n, it v-link ADJ to-inf If you are realistic about a situation, you recognize and accept its true nature and try to deal with it in a practical way.
  Police have to be realistic about violent crime...
  It's only realistic to acknowledge that something, some time, will go wrong.
  ...a realistic view of what we can afford.
  Derived words:
  realistically ADV-GRADED usu ADV with v, also ADV adj As an adult, you can assess the situation realistically.
 2) ADJ-GRADED: usu ADJ n Something such as a goal or target that is realistic is one which you can sensibly expect to achieve.
  Is EC membership a realistic goal for Eastern European countries?...
  A more realistic figure is eleven million...
  Establish deadlines that are more realistic.
  Syn:
  sensible
 3) ADJ-GRADED You say that a painting, story, or film is realistic when the people and things in it are like people and things in real life.
  ...extraordinarily realistic paintings of Indians...
  The language is foul and the violence horribly realistic.
  Derived words:
  realistically ADV-GRADED usu ADV with v The film starts off realistically and then develops into a ridiculous fantasy.

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

realistic

re·al·is·tic /ˌriːjəˈlɪstɪk/ adj [more ~; most ~]
1 : able to see things as they really are and to deal with them in a practical way
• He tried to be realistic about the situation.
• We have to be realistic and accept the fact that these problems cannot be solved easily.
- opposite unrealistic
2 : based on what is real rather than on what is wanted or hoped for : sensible and appropriate
• The plan is not very realistic.
• a realistic approach/goal
• It's not realistic to expect people to spend that much money on wedding gifts.
- opposite unrealistic
3 : showing people and things as they are in real life
• a realistic painting/novel/description
• The battle scene in the movie was very realistic. [=it seemed very much like a real battle]
- opposite unrealistic
- re·al·is·ti·cal·ly /ˌriːjəˈlɪstɪkli/ adv
• We need to deal with these problems realistically.
• We can't realistically expect the war to end soon. = Realistically, we can't expect the war to end soon.
• The movie portrayed the battle very realistically.

timely

timely [adjective]

happening at a suitable moment

US /ˈtaɪm.li/ 
UK /ˈtaɪm.li/ 
Example: 

a timely decision

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

timely

timely /ˈtaɪmli/ BrE AmE adjective
[Word Family: noun: ↑time, ↑overtime, ↑timer, ↑timing, ↑timelessness; adjective: ↑timeless, ↑timely ≠ ↑untimely; verb: ↑time; adverb: ↑timelessly]
done or happening at exactly the right time:
The fight ended only with the timely arrival of the police.
in a timely manner/fashion (=as quickly as is reasonable in a particular situation)
We aim to settle all valid claims in a timely manner.
a timely reminder (of something) British English (=one that makes you remember something important)
The crash served as a timely reminder of the dangers of drinking and driving.
 

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

timely

time·ly [timely timelier timeliest]   [ˈtaɪmli]    [ˈtaɪmli]  adjective
happening at exactly the right time
Syn:  opportune
A nasty incident was prevented by the timely arrival of the police.
This has been a timely reminder to us all.
I was grateful for your timely intervention.
Opp:  untimely
Derived Word: timeliness  
Example Bank:
• All claims must be dealt with in a professional and timely manner.

• The timely intervention of a teacher meant a fight was avoided.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

timely / ˈtaɪm.li / adjective

happening at a suitable moment:

a timely reminder

The change in the exchange rate provided a timely boost to the company's falling profits.

timeliness / -nəs / noun [ U ]

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

timely

[ta͟ɪmli]
 ADJ-GRADED (approval)
 If you describe an event as timely, you approve of it because it happens exactly at the moment when it is most useful, effective, or relevant.
  The recent outbreaks of cholera are a timely reminder that this disease is still a serious health hazard...
  The exhibition is timely, since `self-taught' art is catching on in a big way.
 Syn:
 opportune

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

timely

time·ly /ˈtaɪmli/ adj time·li·er; -est [or more ~; most ~] : happening at the correct or most useful time : not happening too late
• Her very timely book examines the effects of global warming on the world's climates.
• a timely decision/warning
• She always responds to my requests in a timely fashion/manner.
- opposite untimely
- time·li·ness noun [noncount]
• the timeliness of the warning

measurable

measurable [adjective]

able to be measured, or large enough to be noticed

US /ˈmeʒ.ɚ.ə.bəl/ 
UK /ˈmeʒ.ər.ə.bəl/ 
Example: 

The service produces clear, measurable benefits to people's health.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

measurable

measurable /ˈmeʒərəbəl/ BrE AmE adjective
[Word Family: adjective: ↑measurable ≠ ↑immeasurable, ↑measured, ↑measureless; noun: ↑measure, ↑measurement; verb: ↑measure; adverb: ↑measurably ≠ ↑immeasurably]
1. large or important enough to have an effect that can be seen or felt SYN noticeable:
The law has had little measurable effect since it was introduced two years ago.
2. able to be measured OPP immeasurable:
measurable results
—measurably adverb:
The company is working to make its environmental performance measurably better.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

measurable

meas·ur·able   [ˈmeʒərəbl]    [ˈmeʒərəbl]  adjective
1. that can be measured

• measurable amounts of pollution in the atmosphere

2. usually before noun large enough to be noticed or to have a clear and noticeable effect
measurable improvements
Derived Word: measurably  
Word Origin:

[measurable measurably] Middle English (in the sense ‘moderate’): from Old French mesurable, from late Latin mensurabilis, from Latin mensurare ‘to measure’.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

measurable / ˈmeʒ. ə r.ə.bl̩ /   / -ɚ- / adjective

able to be measured, or large enough to be noticed:

The service produces clear, measurable benefits to people's health.

 

measurably / -bli / adverb

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

measurable

[me̱ʒərəb(ə)l]
 1) ADJ: usu ADJ n If you describe something as measurable, you mean that it is large enough to be noticed or to be significant. [FORMAL]
  Both leaders seemed to expect measurable progress.
  Derived words:
  measurably ADV-GRADED ADV adj/adv, ADV with v The old man's voice was measurably weaker than the last time they'd talked... After this, the pace of events quickened measurably.
 2) ADJ-GRADED Something that is measurable can be measured.
  Economists emphasize measurable quantities - the number of jobs, the per capita income...
  So far the effect is barely measurable.

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

measurable

mea·sur·able /ˈmɛʒərəbəl/ adj : large enough to be measured or noticed
• We haven't had a measurable amount of rain in the past several weeks.
• There has been a measurable [=significant] improvement in the company's performance.
- mea·sur·ably /ˈmɛʒərəbli/ adv
• His job performance has improved measurably.

 

weakness

weakness [noun]

the fact or state of not being strong or powerful

US /ˈwiːk.nəs/ 
UK /ˈwiːk.nəs/ 
Example: 

economic weakness

Oxford Essential Dictionary

weakness

 noun

1 (no plural) the state of not being strong:
He thought that crying was a sign of weakness.

2 (plural weaknesses) something that is wrong or bad in a person or thing
 opposite strength

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

weakness

weakness W3 /ˈwiːknəs, ˈwiːknɪs/ BrE AmE noun
[Word Family: noun: ↑weakling, ↑weakness; verb: ↑weaken; adverb: ↑weakly; adjective: ↑weak]
1. FAULT [countable] a fault in someone’s character or in a system, organization, design etc:
The legislation has a fundamental weakness.
The plan has strengths and weaknesses.
2. LACK OF POWER [uncountable] lack of strength, power, or influence
weakness in
weakness in the economy
weakness of
the growing weakness of local government
3. BODY [uncountable] the state of being physically weak:
muscular weakness
weakness in
weakness in the right arm
4. CHARACTER [uncountable] lack of determination shown in someone’s behaviour:
He couldn’t explain his weakness in giving in to her demands.
I dared not cry or show any sign of weakness.
weakness of
his weakness of character
5. MONEY [uncountable] the condition of not being worth a lot of money
weakness of
the weakness of the pound against the dollar
6. a weakness for something if you have a weakness for something, you like it very much even though it may not be good for you:
I have a real weakness for fashionable clothes.

THESAURUS
■ something wrong
fault a problem in a machine, system, design etc that causes damage or makes it not work properly: The fire was caused by an electrical fault. | a fault in the engine
defect a fault in something such as a product or machine, resulting from the way it was made or designed: Cars are tested for defects before they leave the factory.
weakness a part of a plan, system, or argument that is not as good as the other parts, and makes it likely to fail: What are the strengths and weaknesses of each method?
flaw a fault in a plan, system, argument etc, especially one that makes it useless or not effective: Your argument has a fundamental flaw. | There was one major flaw in his suggestion – we didn’t have enough money.
bug a fault in a computer program: A bug in the system was quickly fixed.
glitch a small fault in the way something works, that can usually be easily corrected: I noticed a small glitch when installing the software.
mistake something that is wrong in someone’s spelling, grammar, calculations etc: The article was full of spelling mistakes.
there’s something wrong with something used when saying that there is a problem in a machine, car etc, but you do not know what it is: There’s something wrong with the computer – it won’t close down.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

weakness

weak·ness [weakness weaknesses]   [ˈwiːknəs]    [ˈwiːknəs]  noun
1. uncountable lack of strength, power or determination
The sudden weakness in her legs made her stumble.
the weakness of the dollar against the pound
He thought that crying was a sign of weakness.

Opp:  strength

2. countable a weak point in a system, sb's character, etc
It's important to know your own strengths and weaknesses.
• Can you spot the weakness in her argument?

Opp:  strength

3. countable, usually singular ~ (for sth/sb) difficulty in resisting sth/sb that you like very much
He has a weakness for chocolate.  
Example Bank:
He saw compromise as a sign of weakness.
He worries a lot about his weight, but can't overcome his weakness for fatty foods.
I have a real weakness for chocolate.
In a moment of weakness I let him drive my car.
Make companies aware of potential weaknesses so they know what steps to take.
Service conditions soon revealed the inherent weaknesses in the vehicle's design.
She didn't seem to have any obvious weaknesses.
The appraisal system seeks to assess employees' strengths and weaknesses.
The criminals exploit apparent weaknesses in the system.
The greatest weakness of the plan lies in its lack of government support.
The management had to address specific weaknesses in training.
The team doesn't have any glaring weaknesses.
They know their strengths and weaknesses.
a fatal weakness in his theory
a position of relative weakness
business leaders who refuse to admit their weaknesses
humanity's moral weakness and capacity for evil
the primary methodological weakness of this study
the underlying weakness of the coalition's position
Can you spot the weakness in that argument?
Certain structural weaknesses have to be overcome before the economy can recover.
He regarded asking for help as a sign of weakness.
She admits that her love of luxury is one of her greatest weaknesses.
The fundamental weakness of the organization is its lack of effective communication.
There are a number of weaknesses in this approach.
Try to consider the relative strengths and weaknesses of your work.
We all have our weaknesses.
We are all subject to some form of human weakness.
• You need to be aware of your own strengths and weaknesses.

• Young recruits were urged to overcome their own innate weaknesses.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition

weakness     / wik.nəs /   noun   
  
    B2   [ U ]   the fact or state of not being strong or powerful:  
  Any change of policy will be interpreted as a sign of weakness. 
    B2   [ C ]   a particular part or quality of someone or something that is not good or effective:  
  There are definite weaknesses in their security arrangements. 
  His main weakness as a manager is his inability to delegate. 
  The later novels show none of the weaknesses of his earlier work. 
  weakness for 
    C2     a strong liking, usually for something that might have unpleasant or unwanted effects:  
  My diet would be fine if only I didn't have this weakness for sweet things. 

 
© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

weakness

[wi͟ːknəs]
 weaknesses
 N-COUNT: usu sing, oft N for n
 If you have a weakness for something, you like it very much, although this is perhaps surprising or undesirable.
 → See also weak
  Stephen himself had a weakness for cats...
  His one weakness, apart from aeroplanes, is ice cream.

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

weakness

weak·ness /ˈwiːknəs/ noun, pl -ness·es
1 [noncount] : the quality or state of being weak
• muscle weakness
• The weakness of her voice surprised me.
• The incident exposed his weakness as a leader.
• Some see compromise as a sign of weakness.
• moral weakness
• the weakness of a radio signal/Internet connection
• the weakness of the dollar/economy
• I told them my secret in a moment of weakness.
2 [count] : a quality or feature that prevents someone or something from being effective or useful
• The tutor assessed the student's strengths and weaknesses.
• The basketball team has few weaknesses.
3 [count]
a : something that you like so much that you are often unable to resist it
• Chocolate is my greatest weakness.
b : a strong feeling of desire for something
• He has a weakness for desserts.

pessimism

pessimism [noun]

emphasizing or thinking of the bad part of a situation rather than the good part, or the feeling that bad things are more likely to happen than good things

US /ˈpes.ə.mɪ.zəm/ 
UK /ˈpes.ɪ.mɪ.zəm/ 
Example: 

There is now a mood of deepening pessimism  about/over  the economy.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

pessimism

 noun (no plural)
thinking that bad things will happen opposite optimism

>> pessimist noun:
Lisa's such a pessimist.
 opposite optimist

>> pessimistic adjective:
Don't be so pessimistic – of course it's not going to rain!
 opposite optimistic

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

pessimism

pessimism /ˈpesəmɪzəm, ˈpesɪmɪzəm/ BrE AmE noun [uncountable]
[Date: 1700-1800; Language: French; Origin: pessimisme, from Latin pessimus 'worst']
a tendency to believe that bad things will happen OPP optimism
pessimism about/over
There is deep pessimism about the future.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

pessimism

pes·sim·ism   [ˈpesɪmɪzəm]    [ˈpesɪmɪzəm]  noun uncountable ~ (about/over sth)
a feeling that bad things will happen and that sth will not be successful; the tendency to have this feeling
There is a mood of pessimism in the company about future job prospects.
This widespread pessimism does not seem justified.
Opp:  optimism  
Word Origin:
[pessimism] late 18th cent.: from Latin pessimus ‘worst’, on the pattern of optimism.  
Example Bank:
He warned against the dangers of undue pessimism.
The article reflects the pessimism of its author.
• There were good grounds for pessimism about future progress.

• the widespread pessimism among young people today

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition

pessimism     / pes.ɪ.mɪ.z ə m /   noun   [ U ]   
  
        emphasizing or thinking of the bad part of a situation rather than the good part, or the feeling that bad things are more likely to happen than good things:  
  There is now a mood of deepening pessimism  about/over  the economy. 
  An underlying pessimism infuses all her novels.   
 →  Opposite     optimism 
  
pessimist     / -mɪst /   noun   [ C ]   
      
  Don't be such a pessimist! 

 
© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

pessimism

[pe̱sɪmɪzəm]
 N-UNCOUNT: oft N about/over n
 Pessimism is the belief that bad things are going to happen.
  ...universal pessimism about the economy...
  My first reaction was one of deep pessimism.
 Ant:
 optimism

 

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

pessimism

 

pes·si·mism /ˈpɛsəˌmɪzəm/ noun [noncount] : a feeling or belief that bad things will happen in the future : a feeling or belief that what you hope for will not happen
• She has expressed pessimism over the outcome of the trial. [=she thinks the outcome will be bad]
• Although the economy shows signs of improving, a sense of pessimism remains.
• He expressed his pessimism about politics and politicians. [=his belief that politics and politicians are generally bad]
- opposite optimism

 

God forbid

God forbid [idiom]

a way of saying that you hope something does not happen

Example: 

God forbid (that) his parents should ever find out.

media: 

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

2. God/Heaven forbid spoken used to emphasize that you hope that something will not happen:
‘Supposing I had an accident.’ ‘God forbid!’

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

God forbid (that …)

God/Heaven forˈbid (that…) idiom
(informal) used to say that you hope that sth will not happen
‘Maybe you'll end up as a lawyer, like me.’ ‘God forbid!’  Some people find this use offensive.

 

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition

heaven forbid     ( also   God forbid ) 
  
        a way of saying that you hope something does not happen:  
  Heaven forbid  (that)  his parents should ever find out. 

 
© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

6) PHRASE: PHR with cl (feelings) If you say God forbid, you are expressing your hope that something will not happen.
  If, God forbid, something goes wrong, I don't know what I would do.
  Syn:
  heaven forbid

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

God/heaven forbid
- used in speech to say that you hope a bad thing will not happen
• This is the number you should call if, God forbid, you should get into an accident.
Heaven forbid that something bad should happen.

rejoice

rejoice [verb]

to feel or show great happiness about something

US /rɪˈdʒɔɪs/ 
UK /rɪˈdʒɔɪs/ 
Example: 

People rejoiced at seeing their leader.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

rejoice

rejoice /rɪˈdʒɔɪs/ BrE AmE verb [intransitive]
[Date: 1300-1400; Language: Old French; Origin: rejoir, from Latin gaudere 'to rejoice']
1. literary to feel or show that you are very happy
rejoice at/over/in
His family rejoiced at the news.
We rejoiced in our good fortune.
2. rejoice in the name/title (of) something British English to have a name or title that is silly or amusing:
He rejoices in the name of Pigg.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

rejoice

 

re·joice [rejoice rejoices rejoiced rejoicing]   [rɪˈdʒɔɪs]    [rɪˈdʒɔɪs]  verb intransitive, transitive (formal)
to express great happiness about sth
When the war ended, people finally had cause to rejoice.
~ at/in/over sth The motor industry is rejoicing at the cut in car tax.
~ to do sth They rejoiced to see their son well again.
~ that… I rejoice that justice has prevailed.
Idiom: rejoice in the name of …
Verb forms:

 
Word Origin:

Middle English (in the sense ‘cause joy to’): from Old French rejoiss-, lengthened stem of rejoir, from re- (expressing intensive force) + joir ‘experience joy’.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

rejoice / rɪˈdʒɔɪs / verb [ I ] formal

to feel or show great happiness about something:

Everyone rejoiced at the news of his safe return.

She rejoiced in her good fortune.

[ + to infinitive ] I rejoiced to see that she had made such a quick recovery.

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

rejoice

[rɪʤɔ͟ɪs]
 rejoices, rejoicing, rejoiced
 1) VERB If you rejoice, you are very pleased about something and you show it in your behaviour.
  [V in/at n] Garbo plays the Queen, rejoicing in the love she has found with Antonio...
  [V in/at n] A Foreign Ministry statement said that the French government rejoiced at the happy outcome to events...
  [V that] Party activists in New Hampshire rejoiced that the presidential campaign had finally started. [Also V]
  Derived words:
  rejoicing N-UNCOUNT There was general rejoicing at the news.
 2) PHRASE: V inflects If you say that a person or thing rejoices in the name of something, you mean that they have a silly or amusing name.
  ...their tortoise, who rejoiced in the name of Carruthers.

 

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

rejoice

 

re·joice /rɪˈʤoɪs/ verb -joic·es; -joiced; -joic·ing [no obj] : to feel or show that you are very happy about something
• We all rejoiced over/about/in/at our friend's good luck.
• The fans rejoiced when their team finally won the World Series. = The fans rejoiced in their team's World Series victory.
rejoice in the name/title of Brit humorous : to have a name/title that makes people laugh or smile
• a woman who rejoices in the name of Eugenia Whelpbottom
- rejoicing noun [noncount]
• There was much rejoicing when the soldiers returned home.

expect

expect [verb] (DEMAND)

to think that someone should behave in a particular way or do a particular thing

US /ɪkˈspekt/ 
UK /ɪkˈspekt/ 
Example: 

I expected you to write me letters.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

expect

 verb (expects, expecting, expected)

1 to think that somebody or something will come or that something will happen:
I'm expecting a letter.
We expected it to be hot in South Africa, but it was quite cold.
She's expecting a baby (= she is going to have a baby) in June.

2 If you are expected to do something, you must do it:
I am expected to work every Saturday.

3 (British, informal) to think that something will happen or is probably true:
I expect she'll be late. She usually is.
They haven't had lunch yet, so I expect they're hungry.
'Is Ian coming?' 'Oh yes, I expect so.'

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

expect

expect S1 W1 /ɪkˈspekt/ BrE AmE verb [transitive]
[Word Family: noun: ↑expectancy, ↑expectation; adverb: ↑expectantly, ↑unexpectedly; adjective: ↑expectant, expected ≠ ↑unexpected; verb: ↑expect]
[Date: 1500-1600; Language: Latin; Origin: exspectare 'to look forward to', from spectare 'to look at']
1. THINK SOMETHING WILL HAPPEN to think that something will happen because it seems likely or has been planned
expect to do something
I expect to be back within a week.
The company expects to complete work in April.
expect somebody/something to do something
Emergency repairs were expected to take three weeks.
I didn’t expect him to stay so long.
expect (that)
There’s the doorbell – I expect it’ll be my mother.
He will be hard to beat. I fully expect (=am completely sure about) that and I’m ready.
‘Who are you?’ he murmured, only half expecting (=thinking it was possible, but not likely) her to answer.
He didn’t get his expected pay rise.
as expected (=in the way that was planned or thought likely to happen)
As expected, the whole family was shocked by the news.
something is (only) to be expected (=used to say that you are not surprised by something, especially something unpleasant)
A little nervousness is only to be expected when you are starting a new job.
2. DEMAND to demand that someone does something because it is a duty or seems reasonable
expect something from somebody
The officer expects complete obedience from his troops.
expect somebody to do something
I can’t expect her to be on time if I’m late myself.
expect a lot of somebody/expect too much of somebody (=think someone can do more than may be possible)
The school expects a lot of its students.
3. THINK SOMEBODY/SOMETHING WILL ARRIVE to believe that someone or something is going to arrive:
We’re expecting Alison home any minute now.
Snow is expected by the weekend.
an expected crowd of 80,000 people
4. THINK to think that you will find that someone or something has a particular quality or does a particular thing:
I expected her to be taller than me, not shorter.
5. be expecting (a baby) if a woman is expecting, she is going to have a baby
6. what can/do you expect? spoken used to say that you are not surprised by something unpleasant or disappointing:
He was late, but what do you expect?
7. how do/can you expect ...? spoken used to say that it is unreasonable to think that something will happen or be true:
If I can’t help her, how can you expect to?
8. I expect British English spoken used to introduce or agree with a statement that you think is probably true:
I expect you’re right.
‘Do you think they’re going to attack?’ ‘I expect so.’

COLLOCATIONS
■ adverbs
fully expect (=completely) We fully expected to win.
confidently expect (=with a feeling of confidence) He confidently expected to be elected again.
half expect (=partly, but not completely) He walked slowly towards the box, half expecting it to explode.
really expect (=definitely) I didn’t really expect her to come.
honestly expect (=really expect) Do you honestly expect me to look after the kids while you go on holiday?
hardly expect (=almost not) You can hardly expect a child of three to know the difference between right and wrong.
rightly expect (=with good reason) The public rightly expects government officials to be honest.
■ phrases
as expected (=in the way that was planned or thought likely to happen) Tickets have not been selling as well as expected.
something is (only) to be expected (=used to say that you are not surprised by something unpleasant) After all this rain, some flooding is only to be expected.
something happens when you least expect it Bad luck tends to happen when you least expect it.
somebody is entitled to expect something (=have the right to think something will happen) You’re entitled to expect decent service at these prices.
it is reasonable/unreasonable to expect something It’s unreasonable to expect a tenant to pay for repairs to the outside of the house.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

expect

 

ex·pect [expect expects expected expecting]   [ɪkˈspekt]    [ɪkˈspekt]  verb
1. transitive to think or believe that sth will happen or that sb will do sth
~ sth We are expecting a rise in food prices this month.
~ sth from sb/sth Don't expect sympathy from me!
~ sth of sb/sth That's not the sort of behaviour I expect of you!
~ to do sth You can't expect to learn a foreign language in a few months.
I looked back, half expecting to see someone following me.
~ sb/sth to do sth House prices are expected to rise sharply.
I didn't expect him to become a successful writer.
Do you really expect me to believe you?
~ (that)… Many people were expecting (that) the peace talks would break down.

it is expected that… It is expected that the report will suggest some major reforms.

2. transitive (often used in the progressive tenses) to be waiting for sb/sth to arrive, as this has been arranged
~ sb/sth to expect a visit/call/letter from sb
Are you expecting visitors?
• We were expecting him yesterday.

~ sb to do sth We were expecting him to arrive yesterday.

3. to demand that sb will do sth because it is their duty or responsibility
~ sth (from sb) Her parents expected high standards from her.
He's still getting over his illness, so don't expect too much from him.
~ sth (of sb) Are you clear what is expected of you?
~ sb to do sth They expected all their children to be high achievers.
• We are expected to work on Saturdays.

~ to do sth I expect to be paid promptly for the work.

4. intransitive, transitive (informal, especially BrE) (not used in the progressive tenses) used when you think sth is probably true
‘Will you be late?’ ‘ I expect so.’
‘Are you going out tonight?’ ‘ I don't expect so.’
~ (that…) ‘Who's eaten all the cake?’ ‘Tom, I expect/I expect it was Tom.’  ‘That’ is nearly always left out.
compare  unexpected 
Idioms: expecting a baby  to be expected  what do you expect?
Verb forms:

 
Word Origin:
mid 16th cent. (in the sense ‘defer action, wait’): from Latin exspectare ‘look out for’, from ex- ‘out’ + spectare ‘to look’ (frequentative of specere ‘see’).  
Thesaurus:
expect verb
1. T
They're not expecting to get any money from the government.
thinklook forward to sthanticipatebargain for/on sthlook for sthlook aheadwatch for sb/sth|formal await
expect/think/anticipate that…
It is expected/thought/anticipated that…
expect/look forward to/anticipate/look for/await results
2. T
They expect their children to be high achievers.
demandaskinsisthold out for sth|formal requirestipulate
expect/demand/ask/require sth from sb
expect/demand/ask/insist/require/stipulate that…
expect/ask/require sb to do sth
Expect, demand or ask? Ask is not as strong as expect or demand, both of which can be more like a command.
3. T (especially BrE, spoken)
I expect he'll be late, as usual.
supposeimaginesuspectassumepresume|especially spoken take it|especially BrE, spoken I dare say|especially AmE, spoken guess
expect/suppose/imagine/suspect/assume/presume/take it/dare say/guess that…
I expect/suppose/imagine/suspect/assume/presume/guess so
Language Bank:
expect
Discussing predictions
The number of people using mobile phones to purchase goods and services is expected / likely to more than double by the end of 2015.
Experts have predicted / forecast that the number of people using their mobile phones to pay for goods and services should exceed 190 million in 2015.
This figure is set to reach 200 million by 2016.
By 2015, 800 million mobile phone users worldwide will be participating in social networks via their phone.
Sales of mobile phones in 2009 were lower than expected .
The company's announcement of 1.26 billion handsets sold for the year is in line with predictions .
Language Banks at fall, illustrate, increase, proportion  
Synonyms:
demand
require expect insist ask
These words all mean to say that sb should do or have sth.
demandto ask for sth very firmly; to say very firmly that sb should have or do sth: She demanded an immediate explanation.
require[often passive] (rather formal) to make sb do or have sth, especially because it is necessary according to a law or set of rules or standards: All candidates will be required to take a short test.
expectto demand that sb should do, have or be sth, especially because it is their duty or responsibility: I expect to be paid promptly for the work.
insistto demand that sth happens or that sb agrees to do sth: I didn't want to go but he insisted. We insist on the highest standards at all times.
askto expect or demand sth: You're asking too much of him.
demand, expect or ask?
Ask is not as strong as demand or expect, both of which can be more like a command.
to demand/require/expect/ask sth of/from sb
to demand/require/expect/insist/ask that…
to require/expect/ask sb to do sth
to demand/require/expect/ask a lot/too much/a great deal
to be too much to expect/ask 
Example Bank:
As expected, they lost the election.
Did you honestly expect me to believe that?
I didn't really expect them to come.
I do not necessarily expect an easy answer to this question.
I think my parents always expected too much of me.
I was half expecting to see Jim at the concert.
I would expect the factory to be working again as normal by next week.
It would be foolish to expect this at his age.
It would be unreasonable to expect them to do all that work for free.
My parents fully expect us to get married.
She confidently expects to win.
The economy is widely expected to pick up in the first half of next year.
The wine list is excellent, as is to be expected from such a high-class restaurant.
They rightly expect to be obeyed.
This kind of behaviour is to be expected from a two-year-old.
Was she really naive enough to expect that he had changed?
We can expect to see an improvement in the weather over the next few days.
We expect good results from our employees.
You are entitled to expect certain minimum standards of accommodation.
You can hardly expect to learn a foreign language in a few months.
You can't seriously expect me to sympathize with you.
‘Are you going out tonight?’ ‘I don't expect so.’
‘Will Bill be there?’ ‘I expect so.’
Are you clear about what is expected of you?
Don't expect sympathy from me!
Don't expect too much from him.
Double the expected number of people came to the meeting.
Her parents expect high standards from her.
I didn't expect him to become a successful writer.
I expect he'll be late, as usual.
I'm expecting an important call.
• Many people were expecting that the peace talks would break down.

• That's not the sort of behaviour I expect of you.

 

 

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

expect / ɪkˈspekt / verb (THINK)

B1 [ T ] to think or believe something will happen, or someone will arrive:

We are expecting a lot of applicants for the job.

[ + (that) ] I expect (that) you'll find it somewhere in your bedroom.

I expect (that) he'd have left anyway.

[ + to infinitive ] He didn't expect to see me.

The financial performance of the business is fully expected (= almost certain) to improve.

We were half expecting you not to come back.

(only) to be expected normal and what usually happens:

All parents of small children get tired. It's to be expected.

 

expect / ɪkˈspekt / verb [ T ] (DEMAND)

B2 to think that someone should behave in a particular way or do a particular thing:

I expect punctuality from my students.

[ + to infinitive ] Borrowers are expected to (= should) return books on time.

 

expected / -ˈspek.tɪd / adjective [ before noun ]

B2

The expected counter-attack never happened.

 

expect / ɪkˈspekt / verb (BE PREGNANT)

be expecting (a baby) B2 to be pregnant:

She shouldn't be lifting those boxes if she's expecting.

Kate and Dom are expecting a baby.

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

expect

[ɪkspe̱kt]
 
 expects, expecting, expected

 1) VERB If you expect something to happen, you believe that it will happen.
  [V to-inf] ...a council workman who expects to lose his job in the next few weeks...
  [V n to-inf] They no longer expect corporate profits to improve...
  [V n to-inf] The talks are expected to continue until tomorrow...
  [V that] Few expected that he would declare his candidacy for the Democratic nomination for the presidency...
  [it be V-ed that] It is expected that the new owner will change the yacht's name...
  [V n] They expect a gradual improvement in sales of new cars.
 2) VERB: usu cont If you are expecting something or someone, you believe that they will be delivered to you or come to you soon, often because this has been arranged earlier.
  [V n] I am expecting several important letters but nothing has arrived...
  [V n] I wasn't expecting a visitor...
  [V adv n] We were expecting him home again any day now.
 3) VERB If you expect something, or expect a person to do something, you believe that it is your right to have that thing, or the person's duty to do it for you.
  [V n] He wasn't expecting our hospitality...
  [V to-inf] I do expect to have some time to myself in the evenings...
  [V n to-inf] I wasn't expecting you to help...
  [V n of n] Is this a rational thing to expect of your partner, or not?...
  [V amount of n] She realizes now she expected too much of Helen.
 4) VERB: with brd-neg If you tell someone not to expect something, you mean that the thing is unlikely to happen as they have planned or imagined, and they should not hope that it will.
  [V n] Don't expect an instant cure...
  [V to-inf] You cannot expect to like all the people you will work with...
  [V n to-inf] Don't expect me to come and visit you there.
 5) VERB: only cont If you say that a woman is expecting a baby, or that she is expecting, you mean that she is pregnant.
  [V n] She was expecting another baby...
  I hear Dawn's expecting again.
 6) PHRASE: PHR that, PHR so/not You say `I expect' to suggest that a statement is probably correct, or a natural consequence of the present situation, although you have no definite knowledge. [SPOKEN]
  I expect you can guess what follows...
  I expect you're tired...
  `Will Joe be here at Christmas?' - `I expect so.'...
  `I don't think you have much of a case.' - `I expect not.'
 7) PHRASE (emphasis) You can say `What can you expect?' or `What do you expect?' to emphasize that there is nothing surprising about a situation or a person's behaviour, especially if you find this disappointing. [SPOKEN]
  It tastes artificial, but at that price what can you expect?...
  If a guy hunts and owns guns, what do you expect?

 

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

expect

 

ex·pect /ɪkˈspɛkt/ verb -pects; -pect·ed; -pect·ing
1 [+ obj] : to think that something will probably or certainly happen
• We expect (that) the economy will improve. = We expect the economy to improve.
• As expected, the election was very close.
• Costs have been higher than expected. = Costs have been higher than they were expected to be.
• It's expected that the new products will be available next month.
• Prices are expected to rise.
• He's opposed to the new law, as you might expect.
• I expect (that) she won't like the news.
• We were half/fully expecting [=we thought there was a reasonable/good chance] that the game would be canceled.
• Good things sometimes happen when you least expect them.
- often followed by to + verb
• She expects to go to college.
• I expect to do well on the exam.
• Who do you expect to win? = Who do you expect will win?
2 [+ obj] : to think that (someone or something) will arrive or that (something) will happen
• We expect them (to arrive) any minute now.
• We expect rain tomorrow. = We expect it to rain tomorrow.
• I'll expect your letter (to arrive) next week.
• I'm expecting a phone call.
• The expected delivery date is next month.
3 [+ obj] : to consider (something) to be reasonable, required, or necessary
• He's a teacher who expects hard work from his students.
• Her latest film lacks the quality that we've come to expect (from her).
• We expected more from/of you.
• This is not the kind of behavior I expected of you.
• He expects a great deal from/of himself and from/of other people.
• I don't think it's too much to expect that you should get to work on time.
• The supplier expects to be paid on time.
• We expect you to pay your debts.
• “England expects every man to do his duty.” Lord Nelson (1805) -
4 always used in progressive tenses [no obj] : to be pregnant
• She's expecting. : to be due to give birth
• She's expecting next month. [=she will probably give birth next month; her baby will probably be born next month]
5 [+ obj] informal : to suppose or think - usually used after I
I expect [=guess] that these problems occur in other places too.
• She feels the same way, I expect.
• “Does she feel the same way?” “I expect so/not.”
- ex·pect·able /ɪkˈspɛktəbəl/ adj [more ~; most ~]
• an expectable [=predictable] reaction

in the air

in the air [idiom]

When something is in the air you can feel it and you know it is happening or will happen soon.

 

Example: 

look at the new boss and all his plans. Change is in the air.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

4 be in the air

a) if a feeling is in the air, a lot of people feel it at the same time :
There was a sense of excitement in the air.
b) to be going to happen very soon :
Change is in the air.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

in the ˈair

felt by a number of people to exist or to be happening There's romance in the air.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary 9th edition © Oxford University Press, 2015

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

in the air

If something is in the air, you feel that it is happening or about to happen:

Love/Change/Spring is in the air.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
© Cambridge University Press 2013

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