British English

five

five [number]

The number 5

US /faɪv/ 
UK /faɪv/ 
Example: 

I work five days a week.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

five

 number
5

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

five

five /faɪv/ BrE AmE number, noun
[Language: Old English; Origin: fif]
1. the number 5:
There is also a golf course five miles away.
I’ll be back by five (=five o'clock).
The family moved to Canada when he was five (=five years old).
2. [countable] a piece of paper money that is worth five dollars or five pounds ⇨ fiver:
Do you have two fives for a ten?
3. give somebody (a) five informal to hit the inside of someone’s hand with your hand to show that you are very pleased about something
4. take five spoken used to tell people to stop working for a few minutes
5. fives [uncountable] a British ball game in which the ball is hit with the hand against any of three walls ⇨ handball
⇨ ↑high five, ↑nine to five
 

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

five

five [five fives]   [faɪv]    [faɪv]  number
5
There are only five cookies left.
five of Sweden's top financial experts
Ten people were invited but only five turned up.
Do you have change for five dollars?
a five-month contract
Look at page five.
Five and four is nine.
Three fives are fifteen.
I can't read your writing— is this meant to be a five?
The bulbs are planted in threes or fives (= groups of three or five).
We moved to America when I was five (= five years old).
Shall we meet at five (= at five o'clock), then?
see also  high five
more at nine to five at  nine
Idiom: give somebody five  
Word Origin:

Old English fīf, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch vijf and German fünf, from an Indo-European root shared by Latin quinque and Greek pente.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

five / faɪv / number

A1 the number 5:

Five, four, three, two, one, blast-off!

I work five days a week.

 

→  See also high five

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

five

[fa͟ɪv]
 
 fives

 1) NUM Five is the number 5.
 2) N-UNCOUNT Fives is a British ball game in which you hit a small hard ball with a glove or bat against three walls of a court.
 3) → See also high five

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

five

five /ˈfaɪv/ noun, pl fives
1 [count] : the number 5
2 [count] : the fifth in a set or series
• the five of clubs
• page five
3 [noncount] : five o'clock
• I get off work at five.
• The store is open until five.
4 [count]
a US : a five-dollar bill
• The total cost was $3.83 and she gave him a five.
b Brit : a five-pound note : fiver
- five adj
five years
- five pronoun
Five (of them) are missing.

four

four [number]

The number 4

US /fɔːr/ 
UK /fɔːr/ 
Example: 

Most animals have four legs.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

four

 number
4

on all fours with your hands and knees on the ground:
We went through the tunnel on all fours.

>> fourth pronoun, adjective, adverb 4th

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

four

four /fɔː $ fɔːr/ BrE AmE number, noun
[Language: Old English; Origin: feower]
1. the number 4:
She is married with four children.
They arrived just after four (=four o'clock).
Luke will soon be four (=four years old).
2. on all fours supporting your body with your hands and knees:
He was down on all fours playing with the puppy.
3. in fours in groups of four people or things:
The boxes were stacked in fours. ⇨ ↑foursome
4. [countable] a hit in ↑cricket that scores four ↑runs because it goes over the edge of the playing area
5. [countable] a team of four people who row a racing boat, or the boat that they row
6. the four corners of the Earth/world literary places or countries that are very far away from each other:
People from the four corners of the world have come to Ontario to make it their home.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

four

four [four fours]   [fɔː(r)]  ;   [fɔːr] 

1. number 4  There are examples of how to use numbers at the entry for five.

2. noun a group of four people or things
to make up a four at tennis

a coach and four (= four horses)

3. noun (in cricket) a shot that scores four runs

4. noun a team of four people who row a long narrow boat in races; the boat that they row 

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

four / fɔː r /   / fɔːr / number

A1 the number 4:

Most animals have four legs.

Their little girl is nearly four.

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

four

[fɔ͟ː(r)]
 
 fours

 1) NUM Four is the number 4.
  Judith is married with four children.
 2) N-COUNT In cricket, if a player hits a four, they score four runs by hitting the ball along the ground so that it crosses the boundary at the edge of the playing area.
  Taylor hit 13 fours and batted for 140 minutes.
 3) N-COUNT A four is a narrow racing boat that is rowed by a team of four people.
 4) PHRASE: PHR after v, v-link PHR If you are on all fours, your knees, feet, and hands are on the ground.
  She crawled on all fours over to the window.

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

four

four /ˈfoɚ/ noun, pl fours
1 [count] : the number 4
2 [count] : the fourth in a set or series
• the four of hearts
3 [noncount] : four o'clock
• “What time is it?” “It's four.”
• I leave each day at four.

- see also all fours

- four adj
• waiting for four hours
- four pronoun
Four (of them) are broken.

three

three [number]

The number 3

US /θriː/ 
UK /θriː/ 
Example: 

I've got three sisters.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

three

 number
3

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

three

three S1 /θriː/ BrE AmE number
[Language: Old English; Origin: thrie, threo]
1. the number 3:
They’ve won their last three games.
We’d better go. It’s almost three (=three o'clock).
My little sister’s only three (=three years old).
2. in threes in groups of three people or things:
Teachers taking part will be asked to work in threes. ⇨ ↑threesome, ↑third

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

three

three [three threes]   [θriː]    [θriː]  number
3  There are examples of how to use numbers at the entry for five.
more at in twos and threes at  two
Idiom: three Rs  
Word Origin:

Old English thrīe (masculine), thrīo, thrēo (feminine), of Germanic origin; related to Dutch drie and German drei, from an Indo-European root shared by Latin tres and Greek treis.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

three / θriː / number

A1 the number 3:

I've got three sisters.

School finishes at three (o'clock).

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

three

[θri͟ː]
 
 threes
 NUM

 Three is the number 3.
  We waited three months before going back to see the specialist.

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

three
 

three /ˈɵriː/ noun, pl threes
1 [count] : the number 3
2 [count] : the third in a set or series
• the three of hearts
3 [noncount] : three o'clock
• “What time is it?” “It's three.”
• I leave each day at three.
in threes : in groups of three
• You'll be working in threes.
three sheets to the wind
- see 2sheet
two's company, three's a crowd
- see company
- three adj
three feet/dollars/weeks
- three pronoun
• I'll take three, please.
• Seven students passed the test and three failed.

two

two [number]

The number 2

US /tuː/ 
UK /tuː/ 
Example: 

They've got two houses.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

two

 number
2

in two into two pieces:
The cup fell on the floor and broke in two.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

two

two /tuː/ BrE AmE number
[Language: Old English; Origin: twa]
1. the number 2:
I’ll be away for almost two weeks.
We have to be there by two (=two o'clock).
His family moved to Australia when he was two (=two years old).
2. in twos in groups of two people or things:
I’d like you to line up in twos, please. ⇨ ↑twosome
3. put two and two together to guess the meaning of something you have heard or seen:
I saw him leaving her house and I put two and two together.
4. that makes two of us spoken used to tell someone that you are in the same situation and feel the same way:
‘But I don’t know anything about children!’ ‘Well, that makes two of us.’
5. two can play at that game spoken used to tell someone that they will not have an advantage over you by doing something because you can do it too
6. a year/a week/a moment/an hour etc or two spoken one or a few years, weeks etc
7. two sides of the same coin used to talk about two ways of looking at the same situation
8. two heads are better than one used to say that two people are more likely to solve a problem or think of an idea than one person working alone
9. be in two minds (about something) British English, be of two minds (about something) American English to be unable to decide what to do, or what you think about something:
I was in two minds about whether to go with him.
10. two cents (worth) American English informal your opinion or what you want to say about a subject:
Everyone had to put in their two cents worth.
11. two’s company, three’s a crowd used to say that it is better to leave two people alone to spend time with each other
don’t care two hoots at ↑hoot1(5), ⇨ two/three etc of a kind at ↑kind1(5), ⇨ be two/ten a penny at ↑penny(11), ⇨ in ones and twos at ↑one1(3), ⇨ it takes two to tango at ↑tango2(2), ⇨ kill two birds with one stone at ↑kill1(13), ⇨ no two ways about it at ↑way1(54), ⇨ fall between two stools at ↑fall1(32)
• • •
THESAURUS
pair two things of the same type that you use together. Also used about two people who do something together or who you often see together: a pair of shoes | a pair of socks | Winners will receive a pair of tickets for the show. | The pair were arrested six days after the killing. | They're a funny pair! | The British pair will be playing in the final on Saturday.
a couple (of something) two things of the same type, or a very small number of things: There were a couple of empty seats at the table. | Do you have any stamps? I just need a couple.
couple noun [countable] two people who are married or having a sexual relationship: a married couple | The couple met at university.
twins noun [plural] two children who were born on the same day to the same mother: The twins look very alike. | identical twins
duo noun [countable] two people who perform together or who are often seen together: a comedy duo
duet noun [countable] a piece of music written for two people to play: They played a duet by Brahms.
twice two times adverb: The group meets twice a week. | She sneezed twice.
■ for two people
for two for two people: A table for two, please.
double bed/double room a bed for two people, or a room that has a bed for two people in it: I'd like to book a double room.
twin beds/twin room two separate single beds, or a room with two separate single beds: We asked for a twin room, and they've give us a double room.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

two

two [two twos]   [tuː]    [tuː]  number
2  There are examples of how to use numbers at the entry for five.
more at be in two minds about sth/doing sthbe of two minds about sth/doing sth at  mind  n., in two shakesin a couple of shakes at  shake  n.
Idioms: day/moment/pound or two  fall between two stools  in two  in twos and threes  it takes two to do something  not have two beans/brain cells to rub together  put two and two together  that makes two of us  two sides of the same coin  
Word Origin:

Old English twā (feminine and neuter) of Germanic origin; related to Dutch twee and German zwei, from an Indo-European root shared by Latin and Greek duo. Compare with twain.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

two / tuː / number

A1 the number 2:

They've got two houses.

He'll be two (years old) in February.

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

two

[tu͟ː]
 
 twos

 1) NUM Two is the number 2.
 2) PHRASE If you say it takes two or it takes two to tango, you mean that a situation or argument involves two people and they are both therefore responsible for it.
  Divorce is never the fault of one partner; it takes two...
  It takes two to tango and so far our relationship has been one-sided.
 3) PHRASE: V inflects If you put two and two together, you work out the truth about something for yourself, by using the information that is available to you.
  Putting two and two together, I assume that this was the car he used.
 4) to kill two birds with one stonesee bird
 two a pennysee penny

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

two

two /ˈtuː/ noun, pl twos
1 [count] : the number 2
2 [count] : the second in a set or series
• page two
3 [noncount] : two o'clock
• It was two in the morning.
a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush
- see bird
a thing or two
- see thing
in two : into two equal parts : in half
• He cut the apple in two.
in twos : in groups of two
• You will be working in twos. [=in pairs]
in two shakes
- see 2shake
it takes two, it takes two to tango
- see 1take
of two minds, in two minds
- see 1mind
put two and two together : to make a correct guess based on what you have seen or heard : to figure something out
• You weren't home so I put two and two together and went back to your office to find you.
put/stick two fingers up at someone
- see 1finger
serve two masters
- see 1serve
two by two : in groups of two : in pairs
• The children lined up two by two.
two cents
- see cent
two left feet
- see 1foot
two's company, three's a crowd
- see company
two sides of the same coin
- see 1coin

one

one [number,determiner] (NUMBER)

The number 1

US /wʌn/ 
UK /wʌn/ 
Example: 

You've got three bags and I've only got one.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

number, adjective

1 the number 1:
One and one make two (1 + 1 = 2).
Only one person spoke.

2 a person or thing, especially when they are part of a group:
One of my friends is ill.
I've lost one of my books.

3 only:
You are the one person I can trust.

4 used for talking about a particular time, without saying exactly when:
I'll come over one evening.

one by one first one, then the next, etc.; separately:
Please come in one by one.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

one

I. one1 S1 W1 /wʌn/ BrE AmE number
1. the number 1:
They had one daughter.
one hundred and twenty-one pounds
Come back at one (=one o'clock).
Katie’s almost one (=one year old).
2. one or two a small number of people or things SYN a few:
There are one or two things to sort out before I leave.
one or two of
One or two of us knew him quite well.
3. in ones and twos British English alone or in pairs, rather than in large numbers or groups:
Guests arrived in ones and twos.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

one

one [one ones] number, determiner, pronoun   [wʌn]    [wʌn]

number, determiner
1. the number 1
Do you want one or two?
There's only room for one person.
One more, please!
• a one-bedroomed apartment

• I'll see you at one (= one o'clock).

2. used in formal language or for emphasis before hundred, thousand, etc, or before a unit of measurement
• It cost one hundred and fifty pounds.

• He lost by less than one second.

3. used for emphasis to mean ‘a single’ or ‘just one’

• There's only one thing we can do.

4. a person or thing, especially when they are part of a group
• One of my friends lives in Brighton.

• One place I'd really like to visit is Bali.

5. used for emphasis to mean ‘the only one’ or ‘the most important one’
He's the one person I can trust.
• Her one concern was for the health of her baby.

• It's the one thing I can't stand about him.

6. used when you are talking about a time in the past or the future, without actually saying which one
• I saw her one afternoon last week.

One day (= at some time in the future) you'll understand.

7. the same

• They all went off in one direction.

8. (informal, especially NAmE) used for emphasis instead of a or an
• That was one hell of a game!

• She's one snappy dresser.

9. used with a person's name to show that the speaker does not know the person
Syn:  certain
He worked as an assistant to one Mr Ming.
more at all in one at  all  pron., be in a minority of one at  minority, back to square one at  square  n.  
Word Origin:
Old English ān, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch een and German ein, from an Indo-European root shared by Latin unus. The initial w sound developed before the 15th cent. and was occasionally represented in the spelling; it was not accepted into standard English until the late 17th cent.  
Grammar Point:
one / ones
One/ones is used to avoid repeating a countable noun, but there are some times when you should not use it, especially in formal speech or writing:
After a possessive (my, your, Mary’s, etc.), some, any, both or a number, unless it is used with an adjective: ‘Did you get any postcards?’ ‘Yes, I bought four nice ones.’ ◊ I bought four ones.
It can be left out after superlatives, this, that, these, those, either, neither, another, which, etc: ‘Here are the designs. Which (one) do you prefer?’ ‘I think that (one) looks the most original.’
These ones and those ones are not used in NAmE, and are unusual in BrE: Do you prefer these designs or those?
It is never used to replace uncountable nouns and is unusual with abstract countable nouns: The Scottish legal system is not the same as the English system, is better than …as the English one.

Idioms: as one  at one  for one  get one over somebody  get something in one  go one better  in one  one after the other  one and all  one and only  one and the same  one by one  one for something  one or two  one up  when you've seen/heard one/you've seen/heard them all

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

one / wʌn / number , determiner (NUMBER)

A1 the number 1:

You've got three bags and I've only got one.

She'll be one year old tomorrow.

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

one

[wʌ̱n]
 
 ones

 1) NUM One is the number 1.
  They had three sons and one daughter.
  ...one thousand years ago...
  Scotland beat England one-nil at Wembley.
  ...one of the children killed in the crash.
 2) ADJ: det ADJ (emphasis) If you say that someone or something is the one person or thing of a particular kind, you are emphasizing that they are the only person or thing of that kind.
  They had alienated the one man who knew the business...
  His one regret is that he has never learned a language.
  Syn:
  only
 3) DET: DET sing-n (emphasis) One can be used instead of `a' to emphasize the following noun.
  There is one thing I would like to know - What is it about Tim that you find so irresistible?...
  One person I hate is Russ.
 4) DET: DET adj sing-n (emphasis) You can use one instead of `a' to emphasize the following adjective or expression. [INFORMAL]
  If we ever get married we'll have one terrific wedding...
  It's like one enormous street carnival here.
 5) DET: DET n-proper You can use one in front of someone's name to indicate that you have not met them or heard of them before. [FORMAL]
  It seems that the fifth man is one John Cairncross.
  Syn:
  a certain
 6) DET: DET sing-n You can use one to refer to the first of two or more things that you are comparing.
  Prices vary from one shop to another...
  The road hugs the coast for hundreds of miles, the South China Sea on one side, jungle on the other.
 ADJ: det ADJ
 One is also an adjective. We ask why peace should have an apparent chance in the one territory and not the other.
 PRON
 One is also a pronoun. The twins were dressed differently and one was thinner than the other.
 7) PRON You can use one or ones instead of a noun when it is clear what type of thing or person you are referring to and you are describing them or giving more information about them.
  They are selling their house to move to a smaller one...
  We test each one to see that it flies well.
 8) PRON You use ones to refer to people in general.
  We are the only ones who know.
 9) PRON: PRON of n, PRON that You can use one instead of a noun group when you have just mentioned something and you want to describe it or give more information about it.
  His response is one of anger and frustration...
  The issue of land reform was one that dominated Hungary's parliamentary elections.
 10) DET: DET sing-n You can use one when you have been talking or writing about a group of people or things and you want to say something about a particular member of the group.
  `A college degree isn't enough', said one honors student.
 PRON
 One is also a pronoun. Some of them couldn't eat a thing. One couldn't even drink.
 11) QUANT: QUANT of adj-superl You use one in expressions such as `one of the biggest airports' or `one of the most experienced players' to indicate that something or someone is bigger or more experienced than most other things or people of the same kind.
  Subaru is one of the smallest Japanese car makers.
 12) DET: DET sing-n You can use one when referring to a time in the past or in the future. For example, if you say that you did something one day, you mean that you did it on a day in the past.
 one daysee day
  How would you like to have dinner one night, just you and me?...
  Then one evening Harry phoned, asking me to come to their flat as soon as possible.
 13) PRON: with supp You can use one to refer to a question, joke, remark, or subject of discussion.
  This is a tricky one to answer...
  Have you heard the one about the Irishman, the Englishman and the American?...
  I told him I'd have to think about that one.
 14) PRON You can use one to refer to an alcoholic drink. [INFORMAL]
  Other members of the committee drifted in for a quick one before closing time.
 15) PRON You use one to make statements about people in general which also apply to themselves. One can be used as the subject or object of a sentence. [FORMAL]
  If one looks at the longer run, a lot of positive things are happening...
  Where does one go from there?...
  Shares and bonds can bring one quite a considerable additional income.
 16) PHRASE: PHR after v If a group of people does something as one, all the people do the same thing at the same time or in the same way. [WRITTEN]
  The 40,000 crowd rose as one.
 17) PHRASE: oft with brd-neg, v-link PHR n/-ing If you say that someone is one for or is a one for something, you mean that they like or approve of it or enjoy doing it.
  I'm not one for political discussions...
  She was a real one for flirting with the boys.
 18) PHRASE: PHR before v (emphasis) You can use for one to emphasize that a particular person is definitely reacting or behaving in a particular way, even if other people are not.
  I, for one, hope you don't get the job.
 19) PHRASE: usu PHR pl-n (emphasis) You can use expressions such as a hundred and one, a thousand and one, and a million and one to emphasize that you are talking about a large number of things or people.
  There are a hundred and one ways in which you can raise money.
 20) PHRASE: pl-n PHR, PHR after v You can use in one to indicate that something is a single unit, but is made up of several different parts or has several different functions.
  ...a love story and an adventure all in one...
  This cream moisturises and repairs in one.
 21) PHRASE: PHR with cl You can use in ones and twos to indicate that people do things or something happens gradually and in small groups.
  They lose interest and start drifting away in ones and twos.
 22) PHRASE: PHR with cl You use one after the other or one after another to say that actions or events happen with very little time between them.
  My three guitars broke one after the other...
  One after another, people described how hard it is for them to get medical care.
 23) PHRASE: PHR n-proper The one and only can be used in front of the name of an actor, singer, or other famous person when they are being introduced on a show.
  ...one of the greatest ever rock performers, the one and only Tina Turner.
 24) PHRASE: PHR with cl You can use one by one to indicate that people do things or that things happen in sequence, not all at the same time.
  We went into the room one by one...
  One by one the houses burst into flames.
 25) PHRASE: usu PHR of pl-n You use one or other to refer to one or more things or people in a group, when it does not matter which particular one or ones are thought of or chosen.
  One or other of the two women was wrong.
 26) PHRASE: oft PHR pl-n, PHR of pl-n One or two means a few.
  We may make one or two changes...
  I've also sold one or two to an American publisher...
  I asked one or two of the stallholders about it.
  Syn:
  a few
 27) PHRASE: PHR to-inf, usu v-link PHR If you say that someone is not one to do something, you think that it is very unlikely that they would do it because it is not their normal behaviour.
  I'm not one to waste time on just anyone.
 28) PHRASE: PHR n, usu v-link PHR, PHR after v If you try to get one up on someone, you try to gain an advantage over them.
  ...the competitive kind who will see this as the opportunity to be one up on you.

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

1one /ˈwʌn/ noun, pl ones
1 [count] : the number 1
one, two, three, four, …
2 [count] US : a one-dollar bill
• I don't have any ones. Can you break a five?
3 [noncount] : one o'clock
• I'll be there at one.
4 [count] : the first in a set or series
• On day one of his diet, he cut out sweets.
• She wears a size one.
as one formal
1 : at the same time : all together
• They rose as one and cheered her.
2 : in agreement with each other
• We are as one on this issue.
at one with
1 : in a peaceful state as a part of something else
• I feel at one with nature. [=I feel very closely connected to nature]
2 formal : in a state of agreement with another person
• I am at one with you on this issue.
for one : as an example
• I, for one, disagree. [=I disagree]
• There were many spelling mistakes in the essay. “There” for “their,” for one.
in one : combined in a single thing
• a dictionary and thesaurus (all) in one
• a DVD and VCR player in one
the odd one out
- see 1odd

zero

zero [number]

(the number) 0; nothing

US /ˈzɪr.oʊ/ 
UK /ˈzɪə.rəʊ/ 
Example: 

The number one million is written with a one and six zeros.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

zero

 noun (plural zeros or zeroes)

1 the number 0

2 freezing point; 0°C:
The temperature is five degrees below zero.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

zero

I. zero1 /ˈzɪərəʊ $ ˈziːroʊ/ BrE AmE number (plural zeros or zeroes)
[Date: 1600-1700; Language: French; Origin: zéro, from Arabic sifr 'empty, nothing']
1. the number 0 SYN nought British English:
Make x greater than or equal to zero.
2. the point between + and – on a scale for measuring something, or the lowest point on a scale that shows how much there is left of something:
The petrol gauge was already at zero.
3. a temperature of 0º on the Celsius or Fahrenheit scale
above/below zero
It was five degrees below zero last night. ⇨ ↑absolute zero, ↑sub-zero
4. none at all, or the lowest possible amount
sb’s chances are zero (=they have no chance of success)
Mike’s chances of winning are virtually zero.
From 1971 to 1976 West Vancouver experienced zero population growth.
• • •
THESAURUS
zero the number 0. Also used when saying there is nothing at all: A million is written as one followed by six zeros. | a temperature of zero degrees | Our chances of success are virtually zero.
nil British English zero - used especially in the results of sports games: United won the game three-nil. | In rural areas, employment opportunities are almost nil.
nought British English spoken zero – used in calculations and figures: It has increased by nought point seven five per cent (=0.75%).
O used to say the number 0 like the letter O: The code for Oxford is 0 one eight six five (=01865).

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

zero

zero [zero zeros] number, verb   [ˈzɪərəʊ]    [ˈzɪroʊ]    [ˈziːroʊ]

number
1. (pl. zeros) (BrE also nought) 0

Five, four, three, two, one, zero… We have lift-off.

2. a temperature, pressure, etc. that is equal to zero on a scale
It was ten degrees below zero last night (= −10°C).

The thermometer had fallen to zero.

3. the lowest possible amount or level; nothing at all
I rated my chances as zero.
zero inflation  
Word Origin:
early 17th cent.: from French zéro or Italian zero, via Old Spanish from Arabic ṣifr ‘cipher’.

Derived: zero in on somebody 

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

zero / ˈzɪə.rəʊ /   / ˈzɪr.oʊ / number ( plural zeros )

A2 [ C or U ] (the number) 0; nothing:

Five, four, three, two, one, zero.

The number one million is written with a one and six zeros.

Heavy rain has reduced visibility almost to zero (= its lowest point) .

B1 [ U ] on a set of numbers for comparing temperature in degrees Celsius, the level of temperature at which water freezes:

The temperature is expected to drop to ten degrees below zero tonight.

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

zero

[zɪ͟əroʊ]
 zeros, zeroes (plural & 3rd person present), zeroing, zeroed
 1) NUM Zero is the number 0.
  Visibility at the city's airport came down to zero, bringing air traffic to a standstill.
  ...a scale ranging from zero to seven.
  Syn:
  nought, nil
 2) N-UNCOUNT Zero is a temperature of 0°. It is freezing point on the Centigrade and Celsius scales, and 32° below freezing point on the Fahrenheit scale.
  It's a sunny late winter day, just a few degrees above zero...
  That night the mercury fell to thirty degrees below zero.
 3) ADJ You can use zero to say that there is none at all of the thing mentioned.
  This new ministry was being created with zero assets and zero liabilities.
  ...zero inflation...
  His chances are zero.

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

1ze·ro /ˈziroʊ/ noun, pl ze·ros also ze·roes
1 : the number 0

[count]

• One million is a one with six zeros [=(Brit) noughts] after it.

[noncount]

• Two minus two equals zero.
2 [noncount] : the temperature shown by the zero mark on a thermometer
• It's supposed to fall below zero tonight.
• The temperature is 10° above/below zero.
- see also absolute zero, subzero
3 [noncount] : nothing at all
• They are working to reduce the mortality rate to zero.
• Her contribution to the project was close to zero. [=she did almost nothing on the project]
• The car can go from zero to 60 in 10 seconds. [=from not moving at all to going 60 miles per hour in 10 seconds]
• (informal) I know zero [=nada, zilch] about fixing computers.
• You'll have to start from zero [=from scratch] if you can't find your notes.
4 [count] informal : a person who is not important, interesting, popular, etc. - usually singular
• Her new boyfriend's a real zero. [=loser]

slippery

slippery [adjective]

If something is slippery, it is wet or smooth so that it slides easily or causes something to slide

US /ˈslɪp.ɚ.i/ 
UK /ˈslɪp.ər.i/ 
Example: 

Snow and ice have made roads slippery.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

slippery

 adjective
so smooth or wet that you cannot move on it or hold it easily:
a slippery floor
The road was wet and slippery.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

slippery

slippery /ˈslɪpəri/ BrE AmE adjective
[Word Family: noun: ↑slip, ↑slipper, ↑slippage, ↑slipperiness; verb: ↑slip; adjective: ↑slippery]
[Date: 1500-1600; Origin: slipper 'slippery' (11-19 centuries), from Old English slipor]
1. something that is slippery is difficult to hold, walk on etc because it is wet or ↑greasy:
In places, the path can be wet and slippery.
Harry’s palms were slippery with sweat.
2. informal someone who is slippery cannot be trusted:
Martin is a slippery customer (=someone you should not trust) so be careful what you say to him.
3. not having one clear meaning and able to be understood in different ways:
the slippery notion of ‘standards’
4. (be on) a/the slippery slope British English informal used to talk about a process or habit that is difficult to stop and which will develop into something extremely bad
(be on) a/the slippery slope to/towards
He is on the slippery slope to a life of crime.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

slippery

slip·pery   [ˈslɪpəri]    [ˈslɪpəri]  adjective
1. (also informal slippy) difficult to hold or to stand or move on, because it is smooth, wet or polished
slippery like a fish
In places the path can be wet and slippery.

His hand was slippery with sweat.

2. (informal) (of a person) that you cannot trust

Don't believe what he says— he's a slippery customer.

3. (informal) (of a situation, subject, problem, etc.) difficult to deal with and that you have to think about carefully
Freedom is a slippery concept (= because its meaning changes according to your point of view).
Idiom: slippery slope
See also: slippy  
Word Origin:
[slippery] late 15th cent.: from dialect slipper ‘slippery’, probably suggested by Luther's schlipfferig.  
Example Bank:
International law is notoriously slippery.
The concrete gets slippery when it's wet.
The oil made the ground slippery and treacherous to walk on.
The track was wet and slippery for the race.
Watch out— the floor's a bit slippery.

rocks that were slippery with seaweed

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

slippery / ˈslɪp. ə r.i /   / -ɚ- / adjective

C1 If something is slippery, it is wet or smooth so that it slides easily or causes something to slide:

slippery soap

a slippery floor

The road was wet and slippery.

informal disapproving Someone who is slippery cannot be trusted:

He's as slippery as an eel - you can never get a straight answer out of him.

He's a slippery customer (= person) , that Tim, I've never felt comfortable with him.

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

slippery

[slɪ̱pəri]
 1) ADJ-GRADED Something that is slippery is smooth, wet, or oily and is therefore difficult to walk on or to hold.
  The tiled floor was wet and slippery...
  Motorists were warned to beware of slippery conditions.
 2) ADJ-GRADED (disapproval) You can describe someone as slippery if you think that they are dishonest in a clever way and cannot be trusted.
  He is a slippery customer, and should be carefully watched.
 3) PHRASE: N inflects, usu down/on PHR, oft PHR to n If someone is on a slippery slope, they are involved in a course of action that is difficult to stop and that will eventually lead to failure or trouble.
  The company started down the slippery slope of believing that they knew better than the customer.

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

slippery

slip·pery /ˈslɪpəri/ adj slip·per·i·er; -est [also more ~; most ~]
1 : difficult to stand on, move on, or hold because of being smooth, wet, icy, etc.
• The trails were muddy and slippery.
• The floor looks slippery.
• Fish are slippery to hold.
• The sign cautions: “Slippery when wet.”
2 : not easy to understand or identify in an exact way
• a slippery definition
slippery concepts/notions
3 informal : not able to be trusted : tricky
slippery politicians
- slip·per·i·ness noun [noncount]

duck

duck [verb]

To move your head or the top part of your body quickly down, especially to avoid being hit

US /dʌk/ 
UK /dʌk/ 
Example: 

duck your head or you'll bang it on the doorframe.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

duck

 verb (ducks, ducking, ducked )
to move your head down quickly, so that something does not hit you or so that somebody does not see you:
He saw the ball coming towards him and ducked.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

II. duck2 BrE AmE verb
1. (also duck down) [intransitive and transitive] to lower your head or body very quickly, especially to avoid being seen or hit:
If she hadn’t ducked, the ball would have hit her.
duck behind/under etc
Jamie saw his father coming and ducked quickly behind the wall.
Tim ducked down to comb his hair in the mirror.
She ducked her head to look more closely at the inscription.
2. [intransitive always + adverb/preposition] to move somewhere very quickly, especially to avoid being seen or to get away from someone
duck into
The two men ducked into a block of flats and disappeared.
duck out of
She ducked out of the door before he could stop her.
duck back
‘Wait a minute’, he called, ducking back inside.
3. [transitive] informal to avoid something, especially a difficult or unpleasant duty SYN dodge:
The ruling body wanted to duck the issue of whether players had been cheating.
Glazer ducked a question about his involvement in the bank scandal.
4. [transitive] to push someone under water for a short time as a joke
duck somebody under something
Tom grabbed him from behind to duck him under the surface.
duck out of something phrasal verb
to avoid doing something that you have to do or have promised to do:
I always ducked out of history lessons at school.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

verb
1. intransitive, transitive to move your head or body downwards to avoid being hit or seen
He had to duck as he came through the door.
~ (down) (behind/under sth) We ducked down behind the wall so they wouldn't see us.
He ducked under the overhanging branches.
He just managed to duck out of sight.

~ sth She ducked her head and got into the car.

2. transitive ~ sth to avoid sth by moving your head or body out of the way
Syn:  dodge

• He ducked the first few blows then started to fight back.

3. intransitive + adv./prep. to move somewhere quickly, especially in order to avoid being seen

• She ducked into the adjoining room as we came in.

4. intransitive, transitive (rather informal) to avoid a difficult or unpleasant duty or responsibility
~ out of sth It's his turn to cook dinner, but I bet he'll try to duck out of it.

~ sth The government is ducking the issue.

5. (NAmE also dunk) transitive ~ sb to push sb underwater and hold them there for a short time
The kids were ducking each other in the pool.
 
Word Origin:
n. senses 1 to 3 Old English duce Germanic duck ‘diving bird’
v. Middle English Germanic Dutch duiken German tauchen ‘dive, dip, plunge’ duck
n. sense 5 mid 19th cent. duck's egg
n. sense 4 late 16th cent. duck
 
Example Bank:
He had to duck through the low doorway.
He just managed to duck out of sight.
I ducked down behind the table.
She ducked under the railings and ran towards him.
He ducked the first few blows, then started to fight back.
• It's his turn to cook dinner, but I bet he'll try to duck out of it.

• We ducked down behind the wall.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

duck / dʌk / verb

[ I or T ] to move your head or the top part of your body quickly down, especially to avoid being hit:

I saw the ball hurtling towards me and ducked (down) .

Duck your head or you'll bang it on the doorframe.

[ T ] to push someone underwater for a short time:

The boys were splashing about and ducking each other in the pool.

[ I + adv/prep ] to move quickly to a place, especially in order not to be seen:

When he saw them coming, he ducked into a doorway.

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

duck

[dʌ̱k]
 ducks, ducking, ducked
 1) N-VAR A duck is a very common water bird with short legs, a short neck, and a large flat beak.
  Chickens and ducks scratch around the outbuildings.
 N-UNCOUNT
 Duck is the flesh of this bird when it is eaten as food. ...honey roasted duck.
 2) N-COUNT A duck is a female duck. The male is called a drake.
  I brought in one drake and three ducks.
 3) VERB If you duck, you move your head or the top half of your body quickly downwards to avoid something that might hit you, or to avoid being seen.
  He ducked in time to save his head from a blow from the poker...
  [V n] He ducked his head to hide his admiration...
  [V adv/prep] I wanted to duck down and slip past but they saw me.
 4) VERB If you duck something such as a blow, you avoid it by moving your head or body quickly downwards.
  [V n] Hans deftly ducked their blows.
  Syn:
  dodge
 5) VERB If you duck into a place, you move there quickly, often in an attempt to avoid danger or to avoid being seen. [mainly INFORMAL]
  [V prep/adv] Matt ducked into his office...
  [V prep/adv] He ducked through the door and looked about frantically.
  Syn:
  dart
 6) VERB (disapproval) You say that someone ducks a duty or responsibility when you disapprove of the fact that they avoid it. [INFORMAL]
  [V n] The Opposition reckons the Health Secretary has ducked all the difficult decisions...
  [V n] He had ducked the confrontation with United Nations inspectors last summer.
  Syn:
  shirk
 7) VERB If someone ducks someone else, they force them or their head under water for a short time.
  [V n] She splashed around in the pool with Mark, rowdily trying to duck him.
 8) → See also dead duck, lame duck, sitting duck
 9) N-VOC (feelings) Some people call other people duck or ducks as a sign of affection. [BRIT]
  Oh, I am glad to see you, duck.
 10) PHRASE: v-link PHR (emphasis) You say that criticism is like water off a duck's back or water off a duck's back to emphasize that it is not having any effect on the person being criticized.
  All the criticism is water off a duck's back to me.
 11) PHRASE: V inflects If you take to something like a duck to water, you discover that you are naturally good at it or that you find it very easy to do.
  Some mothers take to breastfeeding like a duck to water, while others find they need some help to get started.

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

duck

2duck verb ducks; ducked; duck·ing
1 a [no obj] : to lower your head or body suddenly to avoid being seen or hit
• The ceiling was so low I had to duck.
- often + down
• Quick, duck down before they see us!
b [+ obj] : to lower (your head) suddenly
• The ceiling was so low I had to duck my head.
• He ducked his head so they wouldn't see him.
c [+ obj] : to avoid (something, such as a punch) by lowering your head or body suddenly
• He ducked the punch.
2 [+ obj] : to avoid (something or someone you do not want to see or deal with)
• We can't afford to duck the issue any longer.
• He managed to duck [=evade] the question.
• They've been ducking each other for months.
3 always followed by an adverb or preposition [no obj] : to move quickly
• She ducked into a store when it started to rain.
• He ducked around a corner.
4 [+ obj] Brit : to push (someone or something) underwater : dunk
• The children were ducking each other in the pool.
duck out [phrasal verb] informal : to leave suddenly and usually without telling anyone that you are leaving
• We ducked out after the first act of the play.
- often + on or of
• They ducked out on us without even saying goodbye.
• I had to duck out of the meeting to take a phone call.
- often used figuratively
• He wants to duck out of the contract. [=to get out of the contract]
• She ducked out on paying the bill for the meal. [=she avoided paying the bill in a sneaky or improper way]

dream

dream [noun] (HOPE)

Something that you want to happen very much but that is not very likely

US /driːm/ 
UK /driːm/ 
Example: 

It's always been my dream to have flying lessons.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

noun

1 pictures or events which happen in your mind when you are asleep:
I had a dream about school last night.

word building
A bad or frightening dream is called a nightmare.

2 something nice that you hope for:
His dream was to give up his job and live in the country.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

dream

I. dream1 S2 W2 /driːm/ BrE AmE noun [countable]
[Word Family: adjective: dream, ↑dreamless, ↑dreamy; noun: ↑dream, ↑dreamer; verb: ↑dream; adverb: ↑dreamily]
[Language: Old English; Origin: dream 'noise, great happiness']
1. WHILE SLEEPING a series of thoughts, images, and feelings that you experience when you are asleep ⇨ daydream:
I had lots of dreams last night.
dream about
a dream about drowning
in a dream
In my dream I flew to a forest of enormous trees.
2. WISH a wish to do, be, or have something – used especially when this seems unlikely:
Her dream is to make a movie.
dream of (doing) something
She had dreams of university.
fulfil/realize a dream
I fulfilled a childhood dream when I became champion.
I have just met the man of my dreams (=the perfect man)!
beyond your wildest dreams (=better than anything you imagined or hoped for)
3. dream house/home/job etc something that seems perfect to someone:
I’ve finally found my dream house.
Win a dream holiday for two in San Francisco!
4. in a dream having a state of mind in which you do not notice or pay attention to things around you:
Ruth went about her tasks in a dream.
5. be a dream come true if something is a dream come true, it happens after you have wanted it to happen for a long time:
Marriage to her is a dream come true.
6. like a dream extremely well or effectively:
The plan worked like a dream.
7. be/live in a dream world to have ideas or hopes that are not correct or likely to happen:
If you think that all homeless people have it as easy as me, then you are living in a dream world.
8. be a dream be perfect or very desirable:
Her latest boyfriend is an absolute dream.
Some performers are a dream to work with; others are not.
sb’s dream (=something someone would really like)
She’s every adolescent schoolboy’s dream.
9. in your dreams spoken used to say in a rude way that something is not likely to happen:
‘I’m going to ask her to go out with me.’ ‘In your dreams!’
• • •
COLLOCATIONS (for Meaning 1)
■ verbs
have a dream I had a dream about you last night.
■ adjectives
a bad dream (=unpleasant or frightening) The movie gave the kids bad dreams.
a strange/weird dream Sometimes I have a strange dream in which I try to speak but I can’t.
a vivid dream (=very clear) In a vivid dream he saw a huge coloured bird flying above his head.
a recurrent/recurring dream (=that you have many times) Having recurrent dreams is a very common experience.
■ phrases
be/seem like a dream (=seem unreal) That summer was so wonderful it seemed like a dream.
Sweet dreams! (=said to someone who is going to bed) Good night, Sam! Sweet dreams!
• • •
COLLOCATIONS (for Meaning 2)
■ verbs
have a dream/dreams I had dreams of becoming a doctor.
achieve/fulfil/realize a dream (=do or get what you want) He had finally achieved his dream of winning an Olympic gold medal.
pursue/follow a dream (=try to do or get what you want) She left her home town to pursue her dreams.
dream a dream literary (=have a wish) We can dream great dreams for ourselves and others.
■ ADJECTIVES/NOUN + dream
big/great dreams (=a wish to achieve great things) She was a little girl with big dreams.
an impossible dream (=about something that cannot happen) Having a number one record had seemed an impossible dream.
a childhood dream (=that you had when you were a child) I had a childhood dream of becoming an astronaut.
a lifelong dream (=that you have had all your life) His lifelong dream had been to write a novel.
a distant dream (=that it will take a long time to achieve) Peace in this area may still be a distant dream.
■ phrases
a dream comes true (=something you want happens) I’d always wanted to go to Africa and at last my dream came true.
the man/woman/house etc of your dreams (=the perfect one for you) We can help you find the house of your dreams.
not/never in your wildest dreams (=used to say that you had never expected something to happen) Never in my wildest dreams did I think I would win the competition.
beyond your wildest dreams (=better or more than you ever hoped for) Suddenly he was wealthy beyond his wildest dreams.
• • •
THESAURUS
■ when you are sleeping
dream the thoughts, images, and feelings that go through your mind while you are asleep: I had a strange dream last night -- you and I were in some sort of forest.
nightmare a very unpleasant and frightening dream: She still has terrible nightmares about the accident.
daydream a series of pleasant thoughts that go through your mind when you are awake, so that you do not notice what is happening around you: Neil was in a daydream, and didn’t hear the teacher call his name.
reverie formal a state of imagining or thinking about pleasant things, that is like dreaming: The doorbell rang, shaking her from her reverie.
■ something that you want to do
dream something very special that you want to do and that you think about a lot, especially something that is not very likely to happen: As a teenager, his dream was to become a professional footballer.
ambition something that you want to achieve and that you work hard to achieve, especially in your work: My ambition had always been to start my own business.
aspirations the important things that people want from their lives – used especially about the things a society or a large group of people wants: It’s important that young people think seriously about their career aspirations.
fantasy something exciting that you imagine happening to you, which is extremely unlikely to happen and often involves sex: schoolboy fantasies
pipe dream a dream that is impossible or is extremely unlikely to happen: Is world peace no more than a pipe dream?

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

dream

dream [dream dreams dreamed dreamt dreaming] noun, verb   [driːm]    [driːm] 

noun
1. countable a series of images, events and feelings that happen in your mind while you are asleep
I had a vivid dream about my old school.
I thought someone came into the bedroom, but it was just a dream.
‘Goodnight. Sweet dreams.’
Don't think about it. You'll only give yourself bad dreams.
compare  nightmare 

see also  wet dream

2. countable a wish to have or be sth, especially one that seems difficult to achieve
Her lifelong dream was to be a famous writer.
He wanted to be rich but it was an impossible dream.
If I win, it will be a dream come true.
She tried to turn her dream of running her own business into reality.
a dream car/house/job, etc.
I've finally found the man of my dreams.
a chance to fulfil a childhood dream
• It was the end of all my hopes and dreams.

see also  pipe dream

3. singular a state of mind or a situation in which things do not seem real or part of normal life
She walked around in a dream all day.

see also  daydream

4. singular (informal) a beautiful or wonderful person or thing
That meal was an absolute dream.
more at beyond your wildest dreams at  wild  adj.  
Word Origin:
Middle English: of Germanic origin, related to Dutch droom and German Traum, and probably also to Old English drēam ‘joy, music’.  
Thesaurus:
dream noun C
1.
I had a vivid dream about my old school.
nightmarehallucination|especially written vision
a dream/nightmare about sth
have (a) dream/nightmare/hallucinations/vision
a dream/vision fades
2. C
Her lifelong dream was to be a famous writer.
ambitionhopeaspirationfantasyexpectation|especially written wishdesire
have (a/an) dream/ambition/aspirations/hopes/fantasy/expectations/wish/desire
harbour a/an dream/ambition/hope/fantasy/wish/desire
fulfil your dreams/ambitions/hopes/aspirations/fantasies/expectations/wishes/desires
abandon/give up a/an dream/ambition/hope
3. C
She wandered round the house in a dream.
daydreamdazetrancestupor|formal literary reverie
be in a dream/daydream/daze/trance/stupor/reverie
be lost in a dream/daydream/reverie 
Example Bank:
After Betty retired, she and her husband designed and built their dream house.
After Betty retired, she designed and built her dream house.
At last I feel I'm living the dream.
At last his dreams were fulfilled.
Born a poor boy in Kansas, he lived the American dream as a successful inventor.
He had a prophetic dream about a train crash the night before the disaster.
He left his job to pursue his dream of opening a restaurant.
He never abandoned his dream of finding his real mother.
He put all his efforts into making his dream of a united country come true.
He spent his life chasing pipe dreams= fantasies that are unlikely to come true.
Her biggest dream was to become a singer.
His plans to travel the world now seemed like a distant dream.
His waking dream was rudely interrupted by the telephone.
I had a very disturbing dream last night.
I hardly ever remember my dreams.
I hope my dream about prison won't come true!
I was awoken from my dream by a knock at the door.
Images of the crash still haunted his dreams years later.
In her dream, she was on board a ship heading for America.
Peace no longer seemed an impossible dream.
She confided in him all her hopes and dreams.
She fell asleep and dreamed strange dreams.
She found herself standing in front of the crowded hall and making her speech, as if in a dream.
She had this romantic dream of living in a windmill.
She is plagued by strange dreams.
She opened her eyes and the dream faded.
The government is living in a dream world if they think voters will agree to higher taxes.
The injury shattered her dream of running in the Olympics.
The victory keeps San Marino's dream of a World Cup place alive.
Their cruise in the Bahamas was a dream come true.
Their dream turned into a nightmare as the cruise ship began to sink.
They achieved a success beyond their wildest dreams.
a child frightened by a bad dream
a recurrent dream about being late for an exam
her lifelong dream of swimming with dolphins
the girl of his dreams
the great utopian dream that they have cherished for so long
the house of her dreams
their dream of a fairer world
vivid dreams that regularly haunted him
‘Good night. Sweet dreams.’
I've finally found the man of my dreams.
If I win it will be a dream come true.
If he thinks it's easy to get a job he's living in a dream world.
This is a chance to fulfil a childhood dream.
What would be your dream job?
Idioms: go like a dream  in your dreams  like a bad dream

Derived: dream on  dream something away  dream something up

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

dream / driːm / noun [ C ] (SLEEP)

A2 a series of events or images that happen in your mind when you are sleeping:

a good/bad dream

a recurring dream

I had a very odd dream about you last night.

[ + that ] Paul had a dream that he won the lottery.
 

dream / driːm / noun [ C ] (HOPE)

B1 something that you want to happen very much but that is not very likely:

It's always been my dream to have flying lessons.

Winning all that money was a dream come true .

of your dreams the best that you can imagine:

Win the house of your dreams in our fantastic competition!

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

dream

[dri͟ːm]
 ♦♦
 dreams, dreaming, dreamed, dreamt

 (American English uses the form dreamed as the past tense and past participle. British English uses either dreamed or dreamt.)
 1) N-COUNT A dream is an imaginary series of events that you experience in your mind while you are asleep.
  He had a dream about Claire...
  I had a dream that I was in an old study, surrounded by leather books.
 2) VERB When you dream, you experience imaginary events in your mind while you are asleep.
  [V that] Ivor dreamed that he was on a bus...
  [V about/of n] She dreamed about her baby. [Also V]
 3) N-COUNT: usu with supp You can refer to a situation or event as a dream if you often think about it because you would like it to happen.
  He had finally accomplished his dream of becoming a pilot...
  My dream is to have a house in the country...
  You can make that dream come true.
  Syn:
  ambition
 4) VERB If you often think about something that you would very much like to happen or have, you can say that you dream of it.
  [V of/about n/-ing] As a schoolgirl, she had dreamed of becoming an actress...
  [V of/about n/-ing] For most of us, a brand new designer kitchen is something we can only dream about...
  [V that] I dream that my son will attend college and find a good job.
 5) ADJ: ADJ n You can use dream to describe something that you think is ideal or perfect, especially if it is something that you thought you would never be able to have or experience.
  He had his dream house built on the banks of the river Bure.
  ...a dream holiday to Jamaica.
 6) N-SING: poss N If you describe something as a particular person's dream, you think that it would be ideal for that person and that he or she would like it very much.
  Greece is said to be a botanist's dream...
  He's every girl's dream!
 7) N-SING: a N If you say that something is a dream, you mean that it is wonderful. [INFORMAL]
 8) N-COUNT: usu sing, with supp You can refer to a situation or event that does not seem real as a dream, especially if it is very strange or unpleasant.
  When the right woman comes along, this bad dream will be over.
 9) VERB: with neg (emphasis) If you say that you would not dream of doing something, you are emphasizing that you would never do it because you think it is wrong or is not possible or suitable for you.
  [V of -ing/n] I wouldn't dream of making fun of you...
  [V of -ing/n] My sons would never dream of expecting their clothes to be ironed.
 10) VERB: with brd-neg (emphasis) If you say that you never dreamed that something would happen, you are emphasizing that you did not think that it would happen because it seemed very unlikely.
  [V that] I never dreamed that I would be able to afford a home here...
  [V of n] Who could ever dream of a disaster like this?...
  I find life more charming and more astonishing than I'd ever dreamed.
 11) → See also pipe dream, wet dream
 12) PHRASE If you tell someone to dream on, you mean that something they are hoping for is unlikely to happen.
  `Perhaps one day I may go on a relaxing holiday.' - `Yeah, dream on.'
 13) PHRASE: PHR after v, v-link PHR If you say that you are in a dream, you mean that you do not concentrate properly on what you are doing because you are thinking about other things.
  All day long I moved in a dream, my body performing its duties automatically.
 14) PHRASE: PHR after v If you say that someone does something like a dream, you think that they do it very well. If you say that something happens like a dream, you mean that it happens successfully without any problems.
  She cooked like a dream...
  His ship had sailed like a dream.
 15) PHRASE: n PHR If you describe someone or something as the person or thing of your dreams, you mean that you consider them to be ideal or perfect.
  This could be the man of my dreams.
 16) PHRASE: with brd-neg, PHR with cl (emphasis) If you say that you could not imagine a particular thing in your wildest dreams, you are emphasizing that you think it is extremely strange or unlikely.
  Never in my wildest dreams could I imagine there would be this kind of money in the game.
 17) PHRASE: n PHR, PHR after v, v-link PHR (emphasis) If you describe something as being beyond your wildest dreams, you are emphasizing that it is better than you could have imagined or hoped for.
  She had already achieved success beyond her wildest dreams.

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

1dream /ˈdriːm/ noun, pl dreams
1 [count] : a series of thoughts, visions, or feelings that happen during sleep
• He had a dream about climbing a mountain.
• You were in my dream last night.
• Scary movies always give me bad dreams. [=nightmares]
• “Good night, my love. Sweet dreams.” [=I hope you will sleep well and have pleasant dreams]
- see also wet dream
2 [count] : an idea or vision that is created in your imagination and that is not real
• She indulged in dreams [=fantasies] of living in a palace.
• I've found the man/woman of my dreams.
• They succeeded beyond their wildest dreams.
Never in my wildest dreams did I imagine it would be so much fun.
• If you think the work will be easy, you're living in a dream world.
3 a [count] : something that you have wanted very much to do, be, or have for a long time
• He has had a lifelong dream of becoming an actor.
• It's a dream of mine to own a house in the country.
• Tell me your hopes and dreams.
• She followed/fulfilled her dreams.
• Making it to the Olympics was a dream come true.
• Many believe that worldwide peace is an impossible dream.
- see also american dream, pipe dream
b [singular] : someone or something that has the qualities that a person wants most
• The meal was a garlic lover's dream.
• He's every woman's dream.
- usually used before another noun
• She's still trying to find her dream husband.
• Managing a professional baseball team is his dream job.
• They just moved into their dream home.
- see also dream team
4 [singular] informal : something that is beautiful, excellent, or pleasing
• It's a dream of a house.
• The new car is a dream to drive. = The new car drives like a dream.
• My new computer works like a dream. [=works very well]
5 [singular] : a state or condition in which you are not thinking about or aware of the real things that are around you
• He was walking around in a dream.
in your dreams informal
- used to say that you do not think something that another person wants or expects will ever happen
• “Maybe my parents will lend me the car tonight.” “In your dreams.”

 

fear

fear [noun]

An unpleasant emotion or thought that you have when you are frightened or worried by something dangerous, painful, or bad that is happening or might happen

US /fɪr/ 
UK /fɪər/ 
Example: 

I have a fear of heights.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

noun
the feeling that you have when you think that something bad might happen:
I have a terrible fear of dogs.
He was shaking with fear.
My fears for his safety were unnecessary.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

fear

I. fear1 S3 W1 /fɪə $ fɪr/ BrE AmE noun
[Word Family: noun: ↑fear, ↑fearfulness ≠ ↑fearlessness; adjective: ↑fearful ≠ ↑fearless, ↑fearsome; verb: ↑fear; adverb: ↑fearfully ≠ ↑fearlessly]
[Language: Old English; Origin: fær 'sudden danger']
1. [uncountable and countable] the feeling you get when you are afraid or worried that something bad is going to happen
fear of
a fear of flying
fear that
There are fears that share prices could decrease still further.
fear for
The girl’s parents expressed fears for her safety.
in fear
The children looked at her in fear.
without fear
People must be able to express their views without fear of criticism.
2. for fear (that), for fear of something because you are worried that you will make something happen:
She finally ran away for fear that he would kill her.
for fear of doing something
He got to the station early, for fear of missing her.
3. no fear! British English informal used humorously to say that you are definitely not going to do something:
‘Are you going to Bill’s party tonight?’ ‘No fear!’
4. [uncountable] the possibility or danger that something bad might happen:
There’s no fear of revolt now.
5. put the fear of God into somebody informal to make someone feel that they must do something, by making sure they know what will happen if they do not do it:
The Italian manager must have put the fear of God into his team.
6. without fear or favour British English formal in a fair way:
The law must be enforced without fear or favour.
• • •
COLLOCATIONS
■ adjectives
sb’s worst/greatest fear Her worst fear was never seeing her children again.
an irrational fear (=one that is not reasonable) He grew up with an irrational fear of insects.
a deep-seated fear (=very strong and difficult to change) He exploited people’s deep-seated fears about strangers.
groundless (=without any reason) As it turned out, these fears were groundless.
■ verbs
conquer/overcome your fear (=stop being afraid) She managed to conquer her fear of flying.
shake/tremble with fear He was shaking with fear after being held at gunpoint.
show fear She was determined not to show fear.
be gripped by fear (=be very afraid) We were gripped by fear as the boat was tossed around by the waves.
be paralysed with fear (=be so afraid that you cannot move) Bruce was paralysed with fear when he saw the snake.
confirm sb’s fears (=show that what you were afraid of has actually happened) The look on Colin’s face confirmed all my worst fears.
ease/allay/dispel sb’s fears (=help someone stop being afraid) Frank eased my fears about not being able to speak the local language.
■ phrases
be in fear of/for your life (=be afraid that you may be killed) Celia was in fear of her life when she saw the truck coming toward her.
be full of fear The residents are too full of fear to leave their houses.
be/live in fear of something (=be always afraid of something) They were constantly in fear of an enemy attack.
have no fear of something He had no fear of death.
sb’s hopes and fears We each had different hopes and fears about the trip.
■ COMMON ERRORS
► Do not say that someone 'has fear'. Say that someone is frightened or is afraid.
• • •
THESAURUS
fear a feeling of being frightened: He was trembling with fear. | Fear of failure should not stop you trying.
terror a feeling of great fear, because you think that something terrible is about to happen: She let out a scream of pure terror.
fright a sudden feeling of fear, or a situation that makes you feel this: My body was shaking with fright. | You gave me a fright! | He’s had a bit of fright, that’s all.
panic a sudden feeling of fear or nervousness that makes you unable to think clearly or behave sensibly: She was in such a panic that she hardly knew what she was doing! | There were scenes of sheer panic immediately following the bomb blast.
alarm a feeling of fear or worry which shows in your voice or behaviour, because you think something bad might happen: When I mentioned her name, he looked up at me in alarm. | The streets were calm and there was no sign of alarm.
foreboding /fɔːˈbəʊdɪŋ $ fɔːrˈboʊ-/ a feeling that something bad or unpleasant might happen although there is no obvious reason why it should: She felt the same sense of foreboding she had before her father died.
phobia /ˈfəʊbiə $ ˈfoʊ-/ a permanent strong unreasonable fear of something: I had a phobia about going to the dentist.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

fear

fear [fear fears feared fearing] noun, verb   [fɪə(r)]    [fɪr]

noun uncountable, countable
the bad feeling that you have when you are in danger, when sth bad might happen, or when a particular thing frightens you
Her eyes showed no fear.
The child was shaking with fear.
~ (of sb/sth) (a) fear of the dark/spiders/flying, etc.
We lived in constant fear of losing our jobs.
~ (for sb/sth) her fears for her son's safety
Alan spoke of his fears for the future.
~ (that…) the fear that he had cancer
The doctor's report confirmed our worst fears.
more at fools rush in (where angels fear to tread) at  fool  n., strike fear etc. into sb/sb's heart at  strike  v.  
Word Origin:
Old English fǣr ‘calamity, danger’, fǣran ‘frighten’, also ‘revere’, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch gevaar and German Gefahr ‘danger’.  
Thesaurus:
fear noun U, C
The child was shaking with fear.
frightdreadterroralarmpanicphobia
Opp: hope
a fear/dread/terror of sth
in fear/fright/dread/terror/alarm/panic
be filled with fear/dread/terror/alarm/panic
Fear or fright? Fright is a reaction to sth that is happening or has just happened. Use fear to talk about things that always frighten you and things that may happen in the future.:
She cried out in fear/fright.
I have a fear of spiders.
 ¤ I have a fright of spiders.  
Synonyms:
fear
terror panic alarm fright
These are all words for the bad feeling you have when you are afraid.
fearthe bad feeling that you have when you are in danger, when sth bad might happen, or when a particular thing frightens you: (a) fear of flying She showed no fear.
terrora feeling of extreme fear: Her eyes were wild with terror.
panica sudden feeling of great fear that cannot be controlled and prevents you from thinking clearly: I had a sudden moment of panic.
alarmfear or worry that sb feels when sth dangerous or unpleasant might happen: The doctor said there was no cause for alarm .
frighta feeling of fear, usually sudden: She cried out in fright.
fear or fright?
Fright is a reaction to sth that has just happened or is happening now. Use fear, but not fright, to talk about things that always frighten you and things that may happen in the future: I have a fright of spiders. ◊ his fright of what might happen
a fear/terror of sth
in fear/terror/panic/alarm/fright
fear/terror/panic/alarm that…
to be filled with fear/terror/panic/alarm
a feeling of fear/terror/panic/alarm 
Example Bank:
Doctors have voiced fears that we may be facing an epidemic.
Fears are growing of a new oil embargo.
He lied out of fear.
He ran away in fear.
His face was white with fear.
It was the first time she had experienced real fear.
My biggest fear was that my children would get sick.
My worst fears were confirmed.
Nobody refused for fear of being fired.
Nobody refused for fear of losing their job.
Our fears proved unfounded.
Public fears about the disease increased.
She did not know why she should feel such fear.
She managed to overcome her fear.
She stared at him without fear.
The boy showed no fear.
The government is anxious to allay the public's fears.
The men hesitated in fear of whatever was to come next.
The men set off in fear and trepidation.
The people live in fear of attack by the bandits.
The pupils obeyed through fear of punishment.
The sound of gunfire struck fear into the hearts of the villagers.
They have a terrible fear of failure.
This incident has fuelled fears of a full-scale war.
This stoked fears of financial difficulties.
When she heard the news, some of her fear subsided.
his fear about what might happen
my fear for her safety
new fears over terrorism
the constant fear of discovery
the fear that her mother had instilled in her
the girl's childhood fear of being eaten by monsters
the most primal fear, that of death
(a) fear of the dark/spiders/flying
He spoke of his fears for the future.
I had to run away for fear that he might one day kill me.
The child was shaking with fear.
The doctor's report confirmed our worst fears.
Idioms: for fear of of doing something  for fear …  in fear of your life  no fear  put the fear of God into somebody  without fear or favour

Derived: fear for somebody 

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

fear / fɪə r /   / fɪr / noun [ C or U ]

B1 an unpleasant emotion or thought that you have when you are frightened or worried by something dangerous, painful, or bad that is happening or might happen:

Trembling with fear, she handed over the money to the gunman.

Even when the waves grew big, the boy showed no (signs of) fear.

I have a fear of heights.

The low profit figures simply confirmed my worst fears.

[ + that ] There are fears that the disease will spread to other countries.

be in fear of your life to be frightened that you might be killed:

Lakisha sat inside, in fear of her life, until the police came.

be no fear of sth informal to be no possibility that a particular thing will happen:

Malcolm knows the city well, so there's no fear of us getting lost (= we will not get lost) .

for fear that/of sth C2 because you are worried that a particular thing might happen:

They wouldn't let their cat outside for fear (that) it would get run over.

I didn't want to move for fear of wak ing her up.

Word partners for fear noun

cause / fuel / raise / spark fears • express / voice your fears • allay / calm / ease (sb's) fears • heighten fears • overcome a fear • fears are growing / mounting • sth holds no fear for sb • sb's biggest / greatest / worst fear • fear of sth

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

fear

[fɪ͟ə(r)]
 
 fears, fearing, feared

 1) N-VAR: oft N of n/-ing Fear is the unpleasant feeling you have when you think that you are in danger.
  I was sitting on the floor shivering with fear because a bullet had been fired through a window.
  ...boyhood memories of sickness and fear of the dark...
  London Zoo is running hypnosis programmes to help people overcome their fear of spiders.
  Syn:
  terror, dread
 2) VERB If you fear someone or something, you are frightened because you think that they will harm you.
  [V n] It seems to me that if people fear you they respect you.
  Syn:
  be afraid of
 3) N-VAR: with supp, oft N of n/-ing, N that A fear is a thought that something unpleasant might happen or might have happened.
  These youngsters are motivated not by a desire to achieve, but by fear of failure...
  Then one day his worst fears were confirmed...
  His fears might be groundless.
  ...the fear that once a war began it would soon pass beyond the ability of either side to manage it.
 4) VERB If you fear something unpleasant or undesirable, you are worried that it might happen or might have happened.
  [V that] She had feared she was going down with pneumonia or bronchitis...
  [V n] More than two million refugees have fled the area, fearing attack by loyalist forces.
 5) N-VAR: oft N that, N of n/-ing If you say that there is a fear that something unpleasant or undesirable will happen, you mean that you think it is possible or likely.
  There was no fear that anything would be misunderstood...
  There is a fear that the freeze on bank accounts could prove a lasting deterrent to investors.
  Syn:
  risk, chance
 6) VERB If you fear for someone or something, you are very worried because you think that they might be in danger.
  [V for n] Carla fears for her son...
  [V for n] He fled on Friday, saying he feared for his life.
 7) N-VAR: N for n If you have fears for someone or something, you are very worried because you think that they might be in danger.
  He also spoke of his fears for the future of his country's culture.
  ...fear for her own safety.
 8) VERB If you fear to do something, you are afraid to do it or you do not wish to do it.
  [V to-inf] She pursed her lips together, as though fearing to betray her news...
  [V to-inf] Old people fear to leave their homes.
  Syn:
  be afraid
 9) VERB You say that you fear that a situation is the case when the situation is unpleasant or undesirable, and when you want to express sympathy, sorrow, or regret about it. [FORMAL]
  [V that] I fear that a land war now looks very probable...
  [V so/not] `Is anything left at all?' - `I fear not.'
  Syn:
  regret
 10) PHRASE: PHR n/-ing, usu v-link PHR, PHR after v If you are in fear of doing or experiencing something unpleasant or undesirable, you are very worried that you might have to do it or experience it.
  The elderly live in fear of assault and murder.
 11) PHRASE: PHR n/-ing, PHR with cl If you take a particular course of action for fear of something, you take the action in order to prevent that thing happening.
  She was afraid to say anything to them for fear of hurting their feelings...
  No one dared shoot for fear of hitting Pete.
 12) PHRASE: usu PHR with cl You say `fear not' or `never fear' to someone when you are telling them not to worry or be frightened. [OLD-FASHIONED]
  Fear not, Darlene will protect me...
  You'll get the right training, never fear.
  Syn:
  don't worry
 13) CONVENTION (emphasis) You use `no fear' to emphasize that you do not want to do something. [BRIT, INFORMAL]
  When I asked him if he wanted to change his mind, William said `No fear.'
  Syn:
  not likely
 14) PHRASE: V inflects If someone or something puts the fear of God into you, they frighten or worry you, often deliberately.
  At some time or other Eve had obviously put the fear of God into her.

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

1fear /ˈfiɚ/ noun, pl fears
1 : an unpleasant emotion caused by being aware of danger : a feeling of being afraid

[noncount]

• He was trembling with fear.
• an old story that still has the power to inspire fear [=to make people feel afraid]
• unable to walk the streets without fear of being mugged
• They regarded their enemies with fear and hatred/loathing.
• I've been trying to overcome my fear of flying.
• He won't say anything for fear of losing his job. [=because he is afraid of losing his job]
• She lived in fear of being caught. = She lived in fear that she would be caught. [=she was always afraid that she would be caught]
• They lived in (constant) fear of air raids during the war.
• an accident that struck fear into the hearts of [=frightened] skiers everywhere

[count]

• The doctor's diagnosis confirmed our worst fears.
• The government is trying to allay/alleviate/ease fears of a recession.
• Employees expressed fears that the company would go out of business.
• He told us about all his hopes and fears.
• She has a morbid fear of cats.
✦If you are in fear of your life or (US) in fear for your life, you are afraid of being killed.
• She claimed that she shot the burglar because she was in fear for her life.
2 [noncount] : a feeling of respect and wonder for something very powerful
fear of God
✦To put the fear of God into someone is to frighten someone very badly.
• The bad economic news has put the fear of God into investors.
no fear Brit informal
- used in speech to say that there is no reason to be afraid or worried
• “Are you going to tell her the truth?” “No fear [=never fear, fear not], mate: she won't hear a thing from me!” synonyms fear, dread, alarm, and fright mean painful emotion felt because of danger. fear is the most general word and suggests a continuing emotional state.
• people living in fear of violent crimes dread suggests a strong feeling of not wanting to accept or deal with something bad or unpleasant.
• the dread felt by people awaiting bad news alarm may suggest a strong emotion caused by an unexpected or immediate danger.
• They view the worsening food shortage with alarm. fright suggests a feeling caused by something unexpected and often suggests a brief emotion.
• The creaking door gave them a fright.

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