commute

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commute

US /kəˈmjuːt/ 
UK /kəˈmjuːt/ 

a regular journey between work and home

Persian equivalent: 

(عاميانه‌) رفت‌ و آمد روزانه‌

Example: 

I have only a short commute to work.

من فقط یک سفر کوتاه به محل کارم دارم.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

II. commute2 BrE AmE noun [countable usually singular]
the journey to work every day:
My morning commute takes 45 minutes.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

noun
the journey that a person makes when they commute to work
a two-hour commute into downtown Washington
I have only a short commute to work.
Today most commutes are not suburb to city to suburb but from one suburb to another.  
Word Origin:

late Middle English (in the sense ‘interchange (two things)’): from Latin commutare, from com- ‘altogether’ + mutare ‘to change’. Sense 1 originally meant to buy and use a commutation ticket, the US term for a season ticket (because the daily fare is commuted to a single payment).

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

commute / kəˈmjuːt / noun [ C ] informal

a regular journey between work and home:

It's at least an hour's commute to work.

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

commute

[kəmju͟ːt]
 commutes, commuting, commuted
 1) VERB If you commute, you travel a long distance every day between your home and your place of work.
  [V to/from n] Mike commutes to London every day...
  [V between n and n] McLaren began commuting between Paris and London...
  He's going to commute.
  Derived words:
  commuter plural N-COUNT The number of commuters to London has dropped by 100,000. ...a commuter train.
 2) N-COUNT A commute is the journey that you make when you commute. [mainly AM]
  The average Los Angeles commute is over 60 miles a day.
 3) VERB: usu passive If a death sentence or prison sentence is commuted to a less serious punishment, it is changed to that punishment.
  [be V-ed to n] His death sentence was commuted to life imprisonment...
  [be V-ed] Prison sentences have been commuted.

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

commute

 

2commute noun, pl -mutes [count] : the journey that you make when you travel to or from a place that you go to regularly (such as the place where you work) - usually singular
• She has a long commute to work/school.
• There is always a lot of traffic on my morning commute.

commute

US /kəˈmjuːt/ 
UK /kəˈmjuːt/ 

to make the same journey regularly between work and home

Persian equivalent: 

رفت‌ و آمد روزانه‌ يا مكرر كردن‌

Example: 

He commuted to Karaj every day.

او هر روز به‌ كرج‌ رفت‌ و آمد مى‌كرد.‏

Oxford Essential Dictionary

commute

 verb (commutes, commuting, commuted)
to travel a long way from home to work every day:
She lives in the country and commutes to London.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

commute

I.   verb

I. commute1 /kəˈmjuːt/ verb
 [Date: 1400-1500; Language: Latin; Origin: commutare 'to exchange, change', from com- ( ⇨ COM-) + mutare 'to change']
 1. [intransitive] to regularly travel a long distance to get to work
  commute to/from/between
   • Jim commutes to Manhattan every day.
 2. commute a sentence (to something) technical to change the punishment given to a criminal to one that is less severe:
   • Baldry’s 20-year prison sentence was commuted to three years.
 3. commute something for/into something technical to exchange one thing, especially one kind of payment, for another:
   • He commuted his pension for a lump sum.
     • • •

THESAURUS■ to travel

   ▪ travel to go from one place to another, especially places that are far apart: • We travelled to Russia by train. | • I love to travel.
   ▪ go to go somewhere – often used instead of travel: • We’re going to Greece for our holidays this year. | • He’s gone to London on business. | • It’s quicker to go by plane.
   ▪ commute to travel to work or school: • She commutes to work by bicycle.
   ▪ cross to travel across a very large area, for example a desert or ocean: • The slaves crossed the Atlantic in the holds of the ships.
   ▪ tour to travel in order to visit many different places, especially as part of a holiday: • They’re touring Europe by coach.
   ▪ go trekking to do a long and difficult walk in a place far from towns and cities: • They went trekking in the mountains. | • She’s been trekking in Nepal a couple of times.
   ▪ go backpacking to travel to a lot of different places, carrying your clothes with you in your rucksack: • He went backpacking in Australia.
   ▪ roam especially written to travel or move around an area with no clear purpose or direction, usually for a long time: • When he was young, he roamed from one country to another. | • The tribes used to roam around freely, without any fixed territory.
   ▪ journey literary to travel, especially a long distance: • He journeyed on horseback through Palestine.

 

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

commute

 

com·mute[commutecommutescommutedcommuting]verb,noun [kəˈmjuːt] [kəˈmjuːt]

 

verb

 

1. intransitive, transitive to travel regularly by bus, train, car, etc. between your place of work and your home

~ (from A) (to B) She commutes from Oxford to London every day.

~ between A and B He spent that year commuting between New York and Chicago.

• I live within commuting distance of Dublin.

~ sth People are prepared to commute long distances if they are desperate for work.

2. transitive ~ sth (to sth) (law) to replace one punishment with another that is less severe

• The death sentence was commuted to life imprisonment.

3. transitive ~ sth (for/into sth) (finance) to exchange one form of payment, for sth else

 

Word Origin:

late Middle English (in the sense ‘interchange (two things)’): from Latin commutare, from com- ‘altogether’ + mutare ‘to change’. Sense 1 originally meant to buy and use a commutation ticket, the US term for a season ticket (because the daily fare is commuted to a single payment).

 

Culture:

commuting

Commuting is the practice of travelling a long distance to a town or city to work each day, and then travelling home again in the evening. The word commuting comes from commutation ticket, a US rail ticket for repeated journeys, called a season ticket in Britain. Regular travellers are called commuters.

The US has many commuters. A few, mostly on the East Coast, commute by train or subway, but most depend on the car. Some leave home very early to avoid the traffic jams, and sleep in their cars until their office opens. Many people accept a long trip to work so that they can live in quiet bedroom communities away from the city, but another reason is ‘ white flight ’. In the 1960s most cities began to desegregate their schools, so that there were no longer separate schools for white and black children. Many white families did not want to send their children to desegregated schools, so they moved to the suburbs, which have their own schools, and where, for various reasons, few black people live.

Millions of people in Britain commute by car or train. Some spend two or three hours a day travelling, so that they and their families can live in suburbia or in the countryside. Cities are surrounded by commuter belts. Part of the commuter belt around London is called the stockbroker belt because it contains houses where rich business people live. Some places are dormitory towns, because people sleep there but take little part in local activities.

Most commuters travel to and from work at the same time, causing the morning and evening rush hours, when buses and trains are crowded and there are traffic jams on the roads. Commuters on trains rarely talk to each other and spend their journey reading, sleeping or using their mobile phones. Increasing numbers of people now work at home some days of the week, linked to their offices by computer, a practice called telecommuting.

Cities in both Britain and the US are trying to reduce the number of cars coming into town each day. Some companies encourage car pooling (called car sharing in Britain), an arrangement for people who live and work near each other to travel together. Some US cities have a public service that helps such people to contact each other, and traffic lanes are reserved for car-pool vehicles. But cars and petrol/gas are cheap in the US, and many people prefer to drive alone because it gives them more freedom. Many cities have park-and-ride schemes, car parks on the edge of the city from which buses take drivers into the centre. In Britain in 2003 a scheme called congestion charging was introduced in London to make people who drive in the city centre pay a congestion charge.

 

Example Bank:

• She commutes from Peterborough to London every day.

• She commutes from Sunset Park to Manhattan each morning.

• The capital invested will be commuted to a loan.

 

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

commute / kəˈmjuːt / verb [ I ] (TRAVEL)

C1 to make the same journey regularly between work and home:

It's exhausting commuting from Brighton to London every day.

 

commute / kəˈmjuːt / verb (CHANGE)

[ T ] formal to change one thing into another:

People used to believe that you could commute base metals into gold.

[ T ] specialized to exchange one type of payment for a different type:

I think I'll commute my life insurance into an annuity.

[ T ] legal to change a punishment to one that is less severe:

Her sentence was commuted from death to life imprisonment.

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

commute

[kəmju͟ːt]
 commutes, commuting, commuted
 1) VERB If you commute, you travel a long distance every day between your home and your place of work.
  [V to/from n] Mike commutes to London every day...
  [V between n and n] McLaren began commuting between Paris and London...
  He's going to commute.
  Derived words:
  commuter plural N-COUNT The number of commuters to London has dropped by 100,000. ...a commuter train.
 2) N-COUNT A commute is the journey that you make when you commute. [mainly AM]
  The average Los Angeles commute is over 60 miles a day.
 3) VERB: usu passive If a death sentence or prison sentence is commuted to a less serious punishment, it is changed to that punishment.
  [be V-ed to n] His death sentence was commuted to life imprisonment...
  [be V-ed] Prison sentences have been commuted.

 

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

1com·mute /kəˈmjuːt/ verb -mutes; -mut·ed; -mut·ing
1 [no obj] : to travel regularly to and from a place and especially between where you live and where you work
• He commutes to work every day by train.
• She commutes 400 miles a week.
- compare telecommute
2 [+ obj] law : to change (a punishment) to a less severe one
• The judge commuted his death sentence to life imprisonment.
- com·mut·er /kəˈmjuːtɚ/ noun, pl -ers [count]
• busy commuters on their way to work
• a commuter train

Commuting

  1. How do you commute to work/school/University? How long does it take? How much does it usually cost? Is it the best way?
  2. How do you travel? Why?
  3. Did you think about commuting, when you were choosing your workplace?
  4. Would you accept to travel/commute to other cities to have a better job?
  5. Are there certain jobs which require commuting a longer distance in comparison to other jobs?
  6. What do you think is the fastest/slowest/cheapest, most expensive/safest/ most dangerous means of commuting?
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