music

English translation unavailable for .

music

US /ˈmjuː.zɪk/ 
UK /ˈmjuː.zɪk/ 

Oxford Essential Dictionary

music

 noun (no plural)

1 the sounds that you make by singing, or by playing instruments:
What sort of music do you like?

2 signs on paper to show people what to sing or play:
Can you read music?

word building
There are many different types of music. Here are some of them: classical, heavy metal, jazz, opera, reggae, rock. Do you know any others?

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

music S1 W1 /ˈmjuːzɪk/ BrE AmE noun [uncountable]
[Word Family: noun: music, musical, musician, musicianship, musicology, musicologist; adjective: musical, unmusical; adverb: musically]
[Date: 1200-1300; Language: Old French; Origin: musique, from Latin, from Greek mousike 'art of the Muses', from Mousa; ⇨ muse2]
1. a series of sounds made by instruments or voices in a way that is pleasant or exciting:
I often listen to classical music when I’m in the car.
A new piece of music was specially written for the occasion.
2. the art of writing or playing music:
Peter’s studying music at college.
music lessons
music business/industry etc
a career in the music business
3. a set of written marks representing music, or paper with the written marks on it:
I left my music at home.
McCartney never learned to read music. ⇨ ↑sheet music
4. be music to your ears if someone’s words are music to your ears, they make you very happy or pleased
5. set/put something to music to write music so that the words of a poem, play etc can be sung
face the music at face2(7)
• • •
COLLOCATIONS
■ verbs
listen to music Ella was listening to music on her iPod.
play music A small band was playing jazz music.
write/compose music He composed the music for the 'Lord of the Rings' films.
make music (=play or compose music) We began making music together about five years ago.
■ ADJECTIVES/NOUN + music
loud/soft/quiet They were kept awake by loud music from next door.
pop/rock/classical etc music Johnny Cash was one of country music’s greatest stars.
live music (=played by musicians on stage) Most of the bars have live music.
recorded music Live music can sound very different from recorded music.
background music (=that you hear but do not listen to) the soft background music in the restaurant
choral music (=sung by choirs) We perform a wide variety of choral music.
instrumental music (=with no singing) a programme of instrumental music
chamber music (=classical music played by a small group of musicians) a performance of Schumann’s chamber music
orchestral music (=classical music played by a large group of musicians) He has a large CD collection, mostly orchestral music.
piano/organ music I love listening to piano music.
■ music + NOUN
a music lover Her recordings delighted music lovers.
■ phrases
a piece of music It’s a beautiful piece of music.
■ COMMON ERRORS
► Do not say 'classic music'. Say classical music.
• • •
THESAURUS
music the sounds made by musical instruments or people singing: The music was really loud.
tune the main series of musical notes in a piece of music: a folk song with a pretty tune
melody the main series of notes in a piece of music that has many notes being played at the same time, especially in classical music: The soprano sang the melody.
harmony the chords or notes in a piece of music that support the melody: the rich harmonies in the symphony
piece (also piece of music) an arrangement of musical notes – use this about music without words: It’s a difficult piece to play.
composition formal a piece of music that someone has written: This is one of his own compositions.
work a piece of music, especially classical music: one of Mozart’s best-known works
track one of the songs or pieces of music on a CD: the album’s title track
number a piece of popular music that forms part of a concert or show: the show’s first number

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

music [music musics]   [ˈmjuːzɪk]   [ˈmjuːzɪk]  noun
uncountable
1. sounds that are arranged in a way that is pleasant or exciting to listen to. People sing music or play it on instruments
pop/dance/classical/church music
• to listen to music
• She could hear music playing somewhere.
• It was a charming piece of music.
• the popularity of Mozart's music
• He wrote the music but I don't know who wrote the words.
• The poem has been set to music.
• Every week they get together to make music (= to play music or sing).

see also  chamber music, country music, rock music, soul music

2. the art of writing or playing music
• to study music
• a career in music
• music lessons

• the music business/industry

3. the written or printed signs that represent the sounds to be played or sung in a piece of music
• Can you read music (= understand the signs in order to play or sing a piece of music)?
• I had to play it without the music.
• The music was still open on the piano (= the paper or book with the musical notes on it).
see also  sheet music
more at face the music at  face  v.
Idiom: music to your ears  
Word Origin:
Middle English: from Old French musique, via Latin from Greek mousikē (tekhnē) ‘(art) of the Muses’, from mousa ‘muse’.  
Thesaurus:
music noun U
• pop/dance/classical music
singing • • song • • melody • • harmony
(a) beautiful music/singing/songharmony/melody
listen to/hear music/singing/a song/the melody/the harmony 
Collocations:
Music
Listening
listen to/enjoy/love/be into music/classical music/jazz/pop/hip-hop, etc.
listen to the radio/an MP3 player/a CD
put on/play a CD/a song/some music
turn down/up the music/radio/volume/bass
go to a concert/festival/gig/performance/recital
copy/burn/rip music/a CD/a DVD
download music/an album/a song/a demo/a video
Playing
play a musical instrument/the piano/percussion/a note/a riff/the melody/a concerto/a duet/by ear
sing an anthem/a ballad/a solo/an aria/the blues/in a choir/soprano/alto/tenor/bass/out of tune
hum a tune/a theme tune/a lullaby
accompany a singer/choir
strum a chord/guitar
Performing
form/start/get together/join/quit/leave a band
give a performance/concert/recital
do a concert/recital/gig
play a concert/gig/festival/venue
perform (BrE) at/in a concert/(especially NAmE) a concert
appear at a festival/live
go on/embark on a (world) tour
Recording
write/compose music/a ballad/a melody/a tune/a song/a theme song/an opera/a symphony
land/get/sign a record deal
be signed to/be dropped by a record company
record/release/put out an album/a single/a CD
be top of/top the charts
get to/go straight to/go straight in at/enter the charts at number one 
Example Bank:
• Birmingham's live music scene
• Calypso music played faintly in the distance.
• Can you read music?
• Could you turn that music down?
• He got into music by chance.
• He made up the words and music for the song.
• He played the piece without music.
• Heavy music thundered from the basement.
• Her taste in music was eclectic.
• I pulled the lyrics out and laid them on the music stand.
• I use my laptop to burn music to a CD.
• Listening to music is a great way to relax.
• Music filled the air.
• Put some music on, would you?
• Put your music on the music stand.
• Schubert set several poems by Goethe to music.
• She could hear loud music from the party upstairs.
• She is a rising star in the music world.
• She's really into indie music.
• The ability to appreciate music is largely learnt.
• The album has been praised in the music press.
• The band are number one in the music charts.
• The city has produced a lot of good music.
• The movie uses appropriate period music.
• The music sounded vibrant and loud.
• The music was coming from next door.
• The soft background music made her feel sleepy.
• The sound of pop music drifted through the open window.
• They did their exercises in time to the music.
• We bought a new television and music centre at the weekend.
• We love to make music as a family.
• With the guidance of the conductor, an orchestra creates music and harmonies.
• a beach party with music provided by a local band
• an evening of Scottish music and song
• bars and nightclubs blaring music late into the night
• disco music blaring out of the open windows of a car
• music for piano, cello and voice
• music legend, Elvis Presley
• software that rips music from CDs
• the choir's music director
• the incidental music for a radio play
• the music emerging from the cities of America
• the music which accompanied the dance
• to dance to the music
• Every week they get together to make music.
• He wrote the music but I don't know who wrote the words.
• It was a charming piece of music.
• Many people believe that listening to Mozart's music can improve memory and learning.
• People often choose to listen to music that suits their moods and activities.
• The poem has been set to music.

• pop/dance/classical/church music

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

music / ˈmjuː.zɪk / noun [ U ]

A1 a pattern of sounds made by musical instruments, voices, or computers, or a combination of these, intended to give pleasure to people listening to it:

classical/pop/dance/rock music

a beautiful piece of music

What sort of music do you listen to?

They play good music on this (radio) station.

I just like making music (= playing an instrument or singing) .

Shall I put on some music (= play a recording) ?

the art or study of music:

I studied music at college.

the music business/industry

music lessons

the written system of symbols representing musical notes:

Can you read music?

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

[mju͟ːzɪk]
 
 1) N-UNCOUNT Music is the pattern of sounds produced by people singing or playing instruments.
  ...classical music.
  ...the music of George Gershwin.
  ...a mixture of music, dance, cabaret and children's theatre.
  ...a music critic for the New York Times.
 2) N-UNCOUNT Music is the art of creating or performing music.
  He went on to study music, specialising in the clarinet.
  ...a music lesson.
 3) N-UNCOUNT Music is the symbols written on paper which represent musical sounds.
 → See also sheet music
  He's never been able to read music.
 4) PHRASE: v-link PHR (feelings) If something that you hear is music to your ears, it makes you feel very happy.
  Popular support - it's music to the ears of any politician.
 5) PHRASE: V inflects If you face the music, you put yourself in a position where you will be criticized or punished for something you have done.
  Sooner or later, I'm going to have to face the music.

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

music

 

mu·sic /ˈmjuːzɪk/ noun [noncount]
1 : sounds that are sung by voices or played on musical instruments
• listening to live/recorded music
• This is one of my favorite pieces of music.
• performing music in front of an audience
• dancing to the music of a big band
• They are writing/composing music for a new album.
• a song with music by George Gershwin and words/lyrics by Ira Gershwin
• classical/popular music
• They like to make music [=play or sing music] with friends.
• The play/poem was set to music. [=music was written to go with the words of the play/poem]
background music [=music played while something else is happening]
- often used before another noun
• the music industry
• a music video [=a video recording of a performance of popular music]
- see also chamber music, country music, folk music, soul music
2 : written or printed symbols showing how music should be played or sung
• He is learning to read music.
• a music stand [=a holder on which printed music is placed so that a musician can see it while playing or singing]
- see also sheet music
3 : the art or skill of creating or performing music
• She studied music in college.
music theory
4 : a pleasant sound
• the music of a brook
• Her words were music to my ears. [=I was very happy to hear what she said]
face the music
 

record

US /rɪˈkɔːrd/ 
UK /rɪˈkɔːd/ 

 to store music, sound, television programmes etc on tape or discs so that people can listen to them or watch them again

Persian equivalent: 

ضبط‌ كردن‌

Example: 

I’ll record the film and we can all watch it later.

من آن فیلم را ضبط می کنم و همگی می توانیم آن را بعداً ببینیم.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

record

I. record1 S1 W1 /ˈrekɔːd $ -ərd/ noun
[Word Family: nounrecordrecorderrecording; verbrecord; adjective: recorded ≠ unrecorded]
1. INFORMATION [countable] information about something that is written down or stored on computer, film etc so that it can be looked at in the future
record of
I try to keep a record of everything I spend.
According to official records, five people were killed last year near that road junction.
2. HIGHEST/BEST EVER [countable] the fastest speed, longest distance, highest or lowest level etc that has ever been achieved or reached, especially in sport:
The American team set a new world record in the sprint relay.
3. MUSIC [countable] a round flat piece of plastic with a hole in the middle that music and sound are stored on ⇒ vinyl:
I spent a lot of time listening to records.
My dad’s got a huge record collection.
a major British record company ⇒ record player
4. PAST ACTIVITIES [singular] the facts about how successful, good, bad etc someone or something has been in the past
record of/in (doing) something
Chemistry graduates have a good record in finding employment.
the company’s track record in improving conditions
record on
Mr Davis defended the government’s record on unemployment (=what they have done about unemployment).
5. CRIME [countable] (also criminal/police record) information kept by the police that shows someone has committed a crime:
He’s only 18 and he already has a record.
They won’t employ anyone with a criminal record.
6. the record books if someone is in the record books, they have achieved more than anyone else in a particular way:
She hopes to get into the record books by becoming the youngest woman to hold a pilot’s licence.
7. in record time very quickly:
She was out of bed and ready for school in record time that morning.
8. off the record if you say something off the record, you do not want people to repeat what you say, for example in newspapers or meetings:
May I talk to you, strictly off the record?
9. be/go on (the) record as saying (that) to say something publicly or officially, so that it may be written down and repeated:
She is on record as saying that teachers are under too much pressure.
10. for the record spoken used to tell someone that what you are saying should be remembered or written down:
For the record, the police never charged me.
11. set/put the record straight to tell people the truth about something, because you want to be sure that they understand what the truth really is:
I would like to set the record straight on a few points.
• • •

COLLOCATIONS (for Meaning 1)
verbs

the records show something Official records show that 44 businesses have stopped trading in the last 12 months.
keep a record Teachers keep a record of students’ progress.
maintain a record formal The directors are responsible for maintaining adequate accounting records.
place/put something on record (=officially say something or write it down) I wish to put on record my objection to the scheme.
access records (also have/gain access to records) (=be able to look at them) Every citizen has the right to access their medical records.

ADJECTIVES/NOUN + record

a written record Where written records do survive, they are incomplete.
historical records Using historical records, we have produced an image of the temple.
official records This has been the wettest winter since official records began.
an accurate record Many hospitals did not keep accurate records.
a detailed record Edwardian travellers left detailed records of their journeys.
a proper record Failure to maintain proper records would be a criminal offence.
confidential records They were transferring confidential student records onto computer.
a permanent record You will have a permanent record of your work.
medical/hospital/health etc records The hospital could not find my mother’s medical records. | Patients’ hospital records are kept on a database.
financial records The company’s financial records must be up-to-date.
public records (=records of births, deaths etc, that the public are allowed to look at) He found the information while examining public records.
police records Violent assaults rose 39 percent, according to police records.

phrases

the biggest/highest etc on record Last summer was one of the hottest on record.
a matter of public record formal (=something that has been written down so that anyone can know it) His salary is a matter of public record.
• • •

COLLOCATIONS (for Meaning 2)
verbs

break/beat a record (=do better or be greater than an existing record) He broke the world record twice.
smash/shatter a record (=beat it easily) She smashed the record by a massive 28 seconds.
hold a record (=have it) Davies holds the record for most points in a season.
set a record (=achieve it for the first time) The twenty-year-old set a new British record of 44.47 secs.
equal a record (also tie a record American English) (=do as well as the record) Woods equalled the course record and finished eleven under par. | Davis tied a team record by hitting six field goals.
a record stands (=is not beaten) His record stood for 42 years.
a record falls (=is beaten) Another record will fall on the last day of the season, if Arsenal win their final game.

adjectives

an all-time record The price of oil has hit an all-time record.
a world record Powell equalled the 100 metres world record with a time of 9.77 seconds.
an Olympic record He won a gold medal and broke the Olympic record by 44 records.
a British/American/Italian etc record Jones won in 10.93 seconds, a new British record.
a course/track record (=the best score for a particular golf course or time for a racecourse or track) Lewis set the fastest lap with a new track record.
a club/team record Irvin holds a team record with 111 catches this season.

record + NOUN

a record number/level/time etc Pollution in the lake has reached record levels.
a record high/low The stock market reached a record high on August 21.
a record attempt (=an attempt to break a record) They will make another record attempt next year.
• • •

THESAURUS

record information about something that is written down: your medical records | the public records office | I have to keep a record of all my spending when I’m travelling on business.
file a set of written records, or information stored on a computer under a particular name: He began reading the file on the case. | I think I may have accidentally deleted the file.
accounts (also books informal) an exact record of the money that a company has received and spent: Companies are required by law to publish their annual accounts. | Someone had been falsifying the accounts. | The company’s books all seemed to be in order.
ledger one of the official books in which a company’s financial records are kept, which show how much it has received and spent: The costs have been moved from one column of the ledger to another.
minutes an official written record of what is said and decided at a meeting: Both points are mentioned in the minutes of the last meeting on August 3rd.
diary a book in which you regularly write down the things that have happened to you: In his diary he wrote, ‘It s lovely having him here, we’ve had so many cosy talks.’ | I’ll just check in my diary to see if I’m free.
blog a web page on the Internet on which someone regularly writes about their life, opinions, or a particular subject: I may not always agree with David, but I always read his blog.
register an official list of names of people, organizations etc: Guests must sign the hotel register. | the national register of births, deaths, and marriages | Lloyds Register of Shipping
roll an official list of names, especially of people who are allowed to do something such as vote or be in a class at school: the electoral roll (=list of people who can vote in an area) | The teacher called the roll (=read out the list of the names of the students, who then have to say if they are present).
log an official record that is kept on a ship or plane: Mr Appleby said he complained to a senior officer, who made a note in the ship’s log.
II. record2 S3 W2 /rɪˈkɔːd $ -ɔːrd/ verb
[Word Family: nounrecordrecorderrecording; verbrecord; adjective: recorded ≠ unrecorded]
[Date: 1100-1200; Language: Old French; Origin: recorder 'to bring to mind', from Latin recordari, from cor 'heart']
1. [transitive] to write information down or store it in a computer or on film so that it can be looked at in the future:
Her husband made her record every penny she spent.
record that
He recorded that the operation was successful.
In 1892 it is recorded that the weather became so cold that the river froze over.
The coroner recorded a verdict of accidental death.
2. [intransitive and transitive] to store music, sound, television programmes etc on tape or discs so that people can listen to them or watch them again:
The group has just recorded a new album.
Is the machine still recording?
I’ll record the film and we can all watch it later.
3. [transitive] if an instrument records the size, speed, temperature etc of something, it measures it and keeps that information:
Wind speeds of up to 100 mph have been recorded.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

record

re·cord [record records recorded recording] noun, verb

 

noun   [ˈrekɔːd] Click to play;   [ˈrekərd] Click to play 

 

WRITTEN ACCOUNT

1. countable ~ (of sth) a written account of sth that is kept so that it can be looked at and used in the future

You should keep a record of your expenses.

medical/dental records

Last summer was the wettest on record.

It was the worst flood since records began.  

 

MUSIC

2. countable a thin round piece of plastic on which music, etc. is recorded

to play a record

a record collection

see also  vinyl  (2)

3. countable a piece or collection of music released as a record, or on CD, the Internet, etc

a record company (= one which produces and sells records)

During her career Billie Holiday made over 100 records.

His new record is available on CD or as a download.

see also  album  (2) 

 

HIGHEST/BEST

4. countable the best result or the highest or lowest level that has ever been reached, especially in sport

She holds the world record for the 100 metres.

to break the record (= to achieve a better result than there has ever been before)

to set a new record

There was a record number of candidates for the post.

I got to work in record time.

record profits

Unemployment has reached a record high (= the highest level ever).  

 

OF SB/STH'S PAST

5. singular ~ (on sth) the facts that are known about sb/sth's past behaviour, character, achievements, etc

The report criticizes the government's record on housing.

The airline has a good safety record.

He has an impressive record of achievement.

see also  track record  

 

OF CRIMES

6. (also ˌcriminal ˈrecord) countable the fact of having committed crimes in the past

Does he have a record?

more at a matter of record at  matter  n.

 

Word Origin:

Middle English: from Old French record ‘remembrance’, from recorder ‘bring to remembrance’, from Latin recordari ‘remember’, based on cor, cord- ‘heart’. The noun was earliest used in law to denote the fact of being written down as evidence. The verb originally meant ‘narrate orally or in writing’, also ‘repeat so as to commit to memory’.

 

Thesaurus:

record noun

1. C

You should keep a record of your expenses.

logminutesdiaryjournalblog

in a/the record/log/minutes/diary/journal/blog

a daily record/log/diary/journal/blog

keep a record/log/diary/journal/blog

2. sing.

The report criticizes the government's record on housing.

track recordhistorybackgroundpast

sb has a record/track record/history/background of sth

record/track record/background in sth

a/an proven/impressive/excellent/poor record/track record

 

Collocations:

Music

Listening

listen to/enjoy/love/be into music/classical music/jazz/pop/hip-hop, etc.

listen to the radio/an MP3 player/a CD

put on/play a CD/a song/some music

turn down/up the music/radio/volume/bass

go to a concert/festival/gig/performance/recital

copy/burn/rip music/a CD/a DVD

download music/an album/a song/a demo/a video

Playing

play a musical instrument/the piano/percussion/a note/a riff/the melody/a concerto/a duet/by ear

sing an anthem/a ballad/a solo/an aria/the blues/in a choir/soprano/alto/tenor/bass/out of tune

hum a tune/a theme tune/a lullaby

accompany a singer/choir

strum a chord/guitar

Performing

form/start/get together/join/quit/leave a band

give a performance/concert/recital

do a concert/recital/gig

play a concert/gig/festival/venue

perform (BrE) at/in a concert/(especially NAmE) a concert

appear at a festival/live

go on/embark on a (world) tour

Recording

write/compose music/a ballad/a melody/a tune/a song/a theme song/an opera/a symphony

land/get/sign a record deal

be signed to/be dropped by a record company

record/release/put out an album/a single/a CD

be top of/top the charts

get to/go straight to/go straight in at/enter the charts at number one

 

Example Bank:

Apart from a parking ticket ten years before, she had an unblemished driving record.

Bob Beamon's long-standing record for the long jump was eventually broken.

Bubka rewrote the pole-vault record books during his career.

Do you have a record of how much you spent?

Fossil records suggest that the region was covered in water until relatively recently.

Given the patchy track record of previous international declarations, is it worthwhile to have such ambitious goals?

He compiled a lifetime record of 209–161.

He has a long arrest record.

He has a spotty military record.

He has always kept an accurate record of his spending.

He has an appalling record for dishonesty.

He has an unenviable record of ill-health.

He has equalled the Olympic record.

He hopes to equal the Olympic record.

He is the latest public figure to go on (the) record about corruption in politics.

Her record shows that she is able to compete under great pressure.

Her walls became lined with gold and platinum records.

His mile record stood for twelve years.

I checked the records but nobody by that name has worked here.

I got to work in record time.

I'll put on one of my favourite records.

If she continues like this she could beat the record.

It was the driest summer on record.

Lewis established a new world record with a time of 9.86 seconds.

Medical records should not be destroyed.

No formal record of the marriage now survives.

No record exists of a battle on this site.

Off the record, he told the interviewer what he thought of his colleagues.

On past records, she should have no problem passing the exam.

Our record compares favourably with that of any similar-sized company.

Prosecutors had subpoenaed his phone records.

She called a press conference to set the record straight about her disappearance.

She has just set a new world record.

She is on record as saying that she once took drugs.

The US saw its trade deficit shrink at a record pace in September.

The airline's accident record makes it among the safest.

The album earned him his second gold record.

The band had a hit record in 1973.

The band signed their first record deal a year after forming.

The company has maintained an accident-free record since it started business.

The historic agreement is preserved in the university records.

The ideal candidate will have a proven track record in project management.

The records contain the bank details of all employees.

The records showed that the building had not been inspected for ten years.

The teacher spoke to her about her poor attendance record.

The university records go back as far as the 13th century.

There are cell phone records that prove we were not even in the apartment.

There is no exact record of the number of accidents.

These viewing figures are an all-time record for a single broadcast.

They have a good record for recognizing emerging talent.

They have the worst human rights record among member countries.

They released their first record in 1963.

This period is poorly represented in the geological record.

This period of barbarian rule is poorly represented in the archaeological record.

Under the law, every citizen has access to their official records.

Unemployment has reached a record high.

We have no record of your conversation with Mr Smith.

When it comes to quality, our record speaks for itself.

Who holds the 100 metre sprint record?

a record of achievement

a verbatim record of the meeting

evidence in the geological record

records on children's progress

teenagers with a criminal record

the government's abysmal record on crime

Auditors inspected their financial records.

I asked them to check their records again.

I'm talking to you off the record

No record of the transaction existed.

She welcomed the opportunity to set the record straight.

The airline has a good safety record.

The body was identified from dental records.

The company's records were neither complete nor up-to-date.

The computer automatically updates my records every day.

The report criticizes the government's record on housing.

Their records date back to 1846.

This seems to be an authentic record of the events around that time.

Who has your medical records?

Would you go on (the) record as saying that?

Idioms: for the record  off the record  on record  put something on record  put the record straight 

 

verb   [rɪˈkɔːd] Click to play;   [rɪˈkɔːrd] Click to play 

 

KEEP ACCOUNT

1. transitive to keep a permanent account of facts or events by writing them down, filming them, storing them in a computer, etc

~ sth Her childhood is recorded in the diaries of those years.

You should record all your expenses during your trip.

~ how, what, etc… His job is to record how politicians vote on major issues.

~ that… She recorded in her diary that they crossed the Equator on 15 June.

it is recorded that… It is recorded that, by the year 630, four hundred monks were attached to the monastery.  

 

MAKE COPY

2. transitive, intransitive to make a copy of music, a film/movie, etc. by storing it on tape or a disc so that you can listen to or watch it again

~ (sth) Did you remember to record that programme for me?

a recorded concert

Tell me when the tape starts recording.

~ sb/sth doing sth He recorded the class rehearsing before the performance.  

 

MUSIC

3. transitive, intransitive ~ (sth) to perform music so that it can be copied onto and kept on tape

The band is back in the US recording their new album.  

 

MAKE OFFICIAL STATEMENT

4. transitive ~ sth | ~ that… to make an official or legal statement about sth

The coroner recorded a verdict of accidental death.  

 

OF MEASURING INSTRUMENT

5. transitive ~ sth | ~ what, how, etc… to show a particular measurement or amount

The thermometer recorded a temperature of 40°C.

 

Word Origin:

Middle English: from Old French record ‘remembrance’, from recorder ‘bring to remembrance’, from Latin recordari ‘remember’, based on cor, cord- ‘heart’. The noun was earliest used in law to denote the fact of being written down as evidence. The verb originally meant ‘narrate orally or in writing’, also ‘repeat so as to commit to memory’.

 

Thesaurus:

record verb T

The discussion was recorded in detail in his diary.

documentchartlogregisterenter|especially BrE minute

record/document/log/register/enter/minute sth as sth

record/document/register/enter sth in sth

record/document/chart how…

record/document/minute that…

 

Example Bank:

I recorded the film on video.

It was all there, faithfully recorded in his uncle's formal style.

She secretly recorded the conversation.

The circumstances of her death were graphically recorded in the local press.

The contract is witnessed by others and duly recorded.

The event is vividly recorded in his journal.

The geographical spread of the industry in the 16th century is hard to ascertain, for much of it is poorly recorded.

The mother's occupation was not routinely recorded on the birth certificate.

The names of those who died are recorded for posterity on a tablet at the back of the church.

The songs were originally recorded on tape.

The time of the accident is recorded as 6.23 p.m.

The weights must be recorded accurately.

This CD has been beautifully recorded.

a concert she had recorded from the radio

historically recorded events

movies recorded on videotape

the most famous and deadly influenza outbreak recorded in history

As a war artist she recorded the work of female volunteers.

Did you remember to record ‘House’ for me?

Examples can be found in every era of recorded history.

It is with great regret that we record the death of one of our founder members.

The discussion was recorded in detail in his diary.

The events recorded in this book took place more than a century ago.

The figures recorded for 2007 show an increase of 23 per cent.

The lists record how MPs voted on specific issues.

The register recorded the names and addresses of residents.

Their names are recorded for posterity on the monument.

There were five million crimes recorded in Britain last year.

These early experiments were all recorded on film, but this historic footage has sadly been lost.

a recorded programme/concert

 

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

record
record (BEST) /ˈrek.ɔːd/ US /-ɚd/
noun [C]
the best or fastest ever done:
He ran the 100 metres in 9.79 seconds and broke/smashed the world record.
She set/established a new European record in the high jump.

record /ˈrek.ɔːd/ US /-ɚd/
adjective
at a higher level than ever achieved before:
The long hot summer has led to a record harvest this year.
Inflation has reached record levels.
We finished the work in record time (= faster than had ever been done before).

 

x
record (STORE ELECTRONICALLY) /rɪˈkɔːd/ US /-ˈkɔːrd/
verb [T]
to store sounds or moving pictures using electronic equipment so that they can be heard or seen later:
Cliff Richard has recorded more number one hit songs than any other British pop star.
We recorded their wedding on video.
I tried to phone her, but all I got was a recorded message saying that she was away for the weekend.
Was the concert live or or was it recorded (= made before being broadcast)?

record /ˈrek.ɔːd/ US /-ɚd/
noun [C]
1 a flat plastic disc on which music is recorded:
Would you like to listen to some records?

2 a song or music which has been recorded and which is available for the public to buy:
The Beatles' first hit record was 'Love Me Do'.

recorder /rɪˈkɔː.dəʳ/ US /-ˈkɔːr.dɚ/
noun [C]
cassette recorder, a tape recorder or a video recorder

recording /rɪˈkɔː.dɪŋ/ US /-ˈkɔːr-/
noun
1 [C] a record, disc or tape on which you can hear speech or music or watch moving pictures:
I bought a recording of Maria Callas singing Verdi.

2 [U] the process or business of putting sounds, especially music, onto records or magnetic tapes using electronic equipment:
a recording studio

 

x
record (STORE INFORMATION) /rɪˈkɔːd/ US /-ˈkɔːrd/
verb [T]
1 to keep information for the future, by writing it down or storing it on a computer:
She records everything that happens to her in her diary.
Unemployment is likely to reach the highest total that has ever been recorded.
[+ that] In his journal, Captain Scott recorded that he and his companions were weakened by lack of food.
LEGAL The coroner recorded (= decided) a verdict of accidental death.

2 If a device records a measurement, it shows that measurement:
The thermometer recorded a temperature of 30 degrees Celsius.

record /ˈrek.ɔːd/ US /-ɚd/
noun
1 [C or U] a piece of information or a description of an event which is written on paper or stored on a computer:
The weather centre keeps a record of the weather.
This summer has been the hottest on record (= the hottest summer known about).

2 [C] information about someone or something which is stored by the police or by a doctor:
A person's medical records are confidential.
He is well known to the police and has a long criminal record (= a list kept by the police of his previous crimes).

3 [C] the facts that are known about a person or a company and the actions they have done in the past:
I won't fly with an airline that has a bad safety record (= whose aircraft have often had accidents).

recorded /rɪˈkɔː.dɪd/ US /-ˈkɔːr-/
adjective
The last recorded (= known) case of smallpox was in the 1970s.

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

record
 
 records, recording, recorded

 (The noun is pronounced [re̱kɔː(r)d, AM -kərd]u>. The verb is pronounced [rɪkɔ͟ː(r)d]u>.)
 1) N-COUNT If you keep a record of something, you keep a written account or photographs of it so that it can be referred to later.
  Keep a record of all the payments...
  There's no record of any marriage or children...
  The result will go on your medical records.
 2) VERB If you record a piece of information or an event, you write it down, photograph it, or put it into a computer so that in the future people can refer to it.
  [V n] Her letters record the domestic and social details of diplomatic life in China.
  [V-ed] ...a place which has rarely suffered a famine in its recorded history.
 3) VERB If you record something such as a speech or performance, you put it on tape or film so that it can be heard or seen again later.
  [V n] There is nothing to stop viewers recording the films on videotape...
  [V-ed] The call was answered by a recorded message saying the company had closed early.
 4) VERB If a musician or performer records a piece of music or a television or radio show, they perform it so that it can be put onto record, tape, or film.
  [V n] It took the musicians two and a half days to record their soundtrack for the film...
  [V n] She has recently recorded a programme for television.
 5) N-COUNT A record is a round, flat piece of black plastic on which sound, especially music, is stored, and which can be played on a record player. You can also refer to the music stored on this piece of plastic as a record.
  This is one of my favourite records.
  ...the biggest and best-known record company in England.
 6) VERB If a dial or other measuring device records a certain measurement or value, it shows that measurement or value.
  [V n] The test records the electrical activity of the brain...
  [V n] The index of the performance of leading shares recorded a 16 per cent fall.
 7) N-COUNT A record is the best result that has ever been achieved in a particular sport or activity, for example the fastest time, the furthest distance, or the greatest number of victories.
  Roger Kingdom set the world record of 12.92 seconds...
  The painting was sold for ₤665,000 - a record for the artist.
  ...the 800 metres, where she is the world record holder.
 8) ADJ: ADJ n You use record to say that something is higher, lower, better, or worse than has ever been achieved before.
  Profits were at record levels...
  She won the race in record time.
 9) N-COUNT: with supp Someone's record is the facts that are known about their achievements or character.
  His record reveals a tough streak...
  He had a distinguished record as a chaplain...
  His country is making a big effort to improve its human rights record.
 10) N-COUNT If someone has a criminal record, it is officially known that they have committed crimes in the past.
  ...a heroin addict with a criminal record going back 15 years...
  Where the accused has a record of violence, they should always be kept in custody.
 11) → See also recordingtrack record
 12) PHRASE If you say that what you are going to say next is for the record, you mean that you are saying it publicly and officially and you want it to be written down and remembered.
  We're willing to state for the record that it has enormous value.
 13) PHRASE If you give some information for the record, you give it in case people might find it useful at a later time, although it is not a very important part of what you are talking about.
  For the record, most Moscow girls leave school at about 18...
  Perhaps you'd like to tell me what you were doing Monday. Just for the record.
 14) PHRASE: usu PHR after v, PHR n If something that you say is off the record, you do not intend it to be considered as official, or published with your name attached to it.
  May I speak off the record?...
  At the end of the lunch, I said I had some off-the-record comments.
 15) PHRASE If you are on record as saying something, you have said it publicly and officially and it has been written down.
  The Chancellor is on record as saying that the increase in unemployment is `a price worth paying' to keep inflation down.
 16) PHRASE If you keep information on record, you write it down or store it in a computer so that it can be used later.
  The practice is to keep on record any analysis of samples.
 17) PHRASE If something is the best, worst, or biggest on record, it is the best, worst, or biggest thing of its kind that has been noticed and written down.
  It's the shortest election campaign on record...
  The 1980s were the hottest decade on record.
 18) PHRASE If you set the record straight or put the record straight, you show that something which has been regarded as true is in fact not true.
  Let me set the record straight on the misconceptions contained in your article.

Entertainment

  1. What do you do for entertainment? How often do you do it?
  2. What are some seasonal entertainments in your country?
  3. Do you like to watch animations? What do you usually watch on TV?
  4. What kind of music do you listen to?
  5. How often do you go to the cinema or theater?
  6. Are there any theme parks in your city? How often do you go there?
  7. What kind of entertainments do you plan for your guests?
  8. Who's the most entertaining person you know? Are you an entertaining person?

Likes and Dislikes

  1. What kind of books do you like? Who's your favorite writer?
  2. What type of music do you like? Who's your favorite singer?
  3. What's your favorite sport? Use three adjectives to say why you like it?
  4. Do you like movies? What kind of movies do you enjoy? Who is your favorite actor/director?
  5. What's your favorite color?
  6. What's your favorite food and restaurant?
  7. Do you like to watch TV? What programs do you watch on TV? 
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