wait

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wait

wait [verb]
US /weɪt/ 
UK /weɪt/ 
Example: 

The dentist kept me waiting for ages.

to allow time to go by, especially while staying in one place without doing very much, until someone comes, until something that you are expecting happens or until you can do something

Persian equivalent: 

صبر كردن‌، منتظر شدن‌ يا بودن‌

Example: 

Don't go, wait for me, too!

نرو، صبر كن‌ من‌ هم‌ بيايم‌!

Oxford Essential Dictionary

 verb (waits, waiting, waited)
to stay in one place until something happens or until somebody or something comes:
If I'm late, please wait for me.
Have you been waiting long?
The doctor kept me waiting (= made me wait) for half an hour.

can't wait used when somebody is very excited about something that is going to happen:
I can't wait to see you again!

wait and see to be patient and find out later:
'What are we having for dinner?' 'Wait and see!'

wait up to not go to bed until somebody comes home:
I'll be home late tonight so don't wait up for me.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

wait

I. wait1 S1 W1 /weɪt/ BrE AmE verb
[Date: 1100-1200; Language: Old North French; Origin: waitier 'to watch']
1. NOT GO/START SOMETHING [intransitive] to stay somewhere or not do something until something else happens, someone arrives etc:
Hurry up! Everyone’s waiting.
Would you mind waiting outside?
wait for
a queue of people waiting for a bus
Wait for me!
wait for somebody/something to do something
She paused, waiting for Myles to say something.
I sat waiting patiently for the wedding to end.
wait until/till
I’ll wait till you come back.
wait (for) three hours/two weeks etc
Can you wait for five minutes?
We’ve been waiting ages.
wait to do something
Are you waiting to use the phone?
keep somebody waiting (=make someone wait, especially by arriving late)
I’m sorry to have kept you waiting.
► Do not say that you ‘are waiting’ someone or something. Say that you are waiting for someone or something.
2. SOMETHING HAS NOT HAPPENED [intransitive] if you are waiting for something that you expect or hope will happen or arrive, it has not happened or arrived yet:
‘Have you heard about the job?’ ‘No, I’m still waiting.’
wait for
I’m still waiting for my results.
wait for somebody/something to do something
I’m waiting for him to realize how stupid he’s been.
3. wait a minute/second/moment etc spoken
a) used to ask someone not to leave or start doing something immediately:
Wait a second, I’ll get my coat and come with you.
Wait a moment, just let me think.
b) used to interrupt someone, especially because you do not agree with what they are saying:
Wait a minute! That’s not what we agreed!
c) used when you suddenly think of, remember, or notice something:
Wait a minute, I’ve got a better idea.
4. somebody can’t wait/can hardly wait spoken
a) used to emphasize that someone is very excited about something and is eager for it to happen:
We’re going to Australia on Saturday – I can’t wait!
can’t wait to do something
I can’t wait to tell Gloria the good news.
Laura could hardly wait to see the twins again.
somebody can’t wait/can hardly wait for
I can’t wait for the summer.
b) used humorously to say that something seems likely to be very boring:
A lecture on transformational grammar? I can hardly wait!
5. something can/can’t wait spoken if something can wait, it is not very urgent. If something can’t wait, it is very urgent:
Go home. The report can wait till tomorrow.
6. wait and see spoken used to say that someone should be patient because they will find out about something later:
‘What’s for dinner?’ ‘Wait and see.’
We will just have to wait and see how things develop.
7. wait until/till ... spoken used when you are excited about telling or showing someone something:
Wait till you see Gaby’s new house!
8. be waiting (for somebody) if something is waiting for you, it is ready for you to use, collect etc:
There’ll be a rental car waiting for you at the airport.
Come round at eight and I’ll have dinner waiting.
9. wait your turn to stay calm until it is your turn to do something, instead of trying to move ahead of other people:
I’ve got two hands and there are three of you. So you’ll have to wait your turn!
10. something is (well) worth waiting for spoken used to say that something is very good, even though it takes a long time to come:
Their new album was worth waiting for.
11. (just) you wait spoken
a) British English used to warn or threaten someone:
I’ll get you back for what you’ve done, just you wait.
b) used to tell someone you are sure something will happen:
It’ll be a huge success. Just you wait.
12. what are you waiting for? spoken used to tell someone to do something immediately:
Well, what are you waiting for? Go and apologize.
13. what are we waiting for? spoken used to say in a cheerful way that you think everyone should start doing something immediately:
What are we waiting for? Let’s go eat.
14. wait for it British English spoken
a) used just before you tell someone something that is funny or surprising:
His name was – wait for it – Mr Bacon.
b) used to tell someone not to do something until the correct time because they seem very impatient to do it now
15. be waiting in the wings to be ready to do something if it is necessary or if a suitable time comes:
Other firms are waiting in the wings, ready to step in and make an offer should the current deal fall through.
16. wait tables American English to work in a restaurant serving food and drink to people at their tables:
I spent the summer waiting tables.
17. (play) a/the waiting game if you play a waiting game, you try to gain an advantage for yourself in a particular situation by deliberately doing nothing until you have seen what other people do
• • •
COLLOCATIONS
■ adverbs
wait two hours/ten minutes etc William waited an hour for his sister to arrive.
wait long (=wait a long time – used especially in questions or negative sentences) She did not have to wait long for a train.
wait ages informal especially British English (=wait a long time) I had to wait ages for a bus.
patiently They patiently waited for the rain to stop.
impatiently He waited impatiently for a reply.
anxiously All his friends were waiting anxiously for their exam results.
wait expectantly (=hoping that something good or exciting will happen soon) He took out his camera and waited expectantly.
■ phrases
keep somebody waiting He kept us waiting for half an hour.
wait with bated breath (=while feeling very anxious or excited) She waited with bated breath to see what he would say.
wait in vain (=wait for something that never happens) They waited in vain for their son to come home.
• • •
THESAURUS
wait to stay somewhere or not do something until something else happens, someone arrives etc: I’ll wait here while you call him. | He said he was waiting for a friend.
hang around (also hang about British English) informal to wait in a place not doing anything, especially so that you are wasting time: They kept us hanging around for hours at the hospital.
hold on/hang on to wait because you are hoping that something will happen: The captain decided it was best to hold on and wait for the other ship to arrive. | We hung on until the very last moment.
can you hold on/hang on? spoken used when telling someone to wait: Can you hang on a minute? I just want to finish this email.
stand by/be on standby to wait and be ready to do something if needed – used especially about soldiers, police, medical teams etc: The army are standing by. | Emergency services were on standby after someone called to say there was a bomb in the city centre.
await formal to wait for something – used about something that you know will happen or arrive: I will await your reply (=in a formal letter). | In February, nearly 200,000 prisoners were awaiting trial. | The soldiers awaited the order to advance.
wait around (also wait about British English) phrasal verb
to stay in the same place and do nothing while you are waiting for something to happen, someone to arrive etc:
Movie-making involves acting for ten minutes and then waiting around for two hours.
We’d better be going. We can’t wait about like this any longer.
wait behind phrasal verb British English
to stay somewhere after other people have left:
She waited behind to help Debbie with the clearing up.
wait in phrasal verb British English
to stay at home and wait there for someone to arrive:
I have to wait in for the repair man.
wait on somebody/something phrasal verb
1. to serve food and drink to someone at their table, especially in a restaurant
2. to wait for a particular event, piece of information etc, especially before doing something or making a decision:
We’re waiting on the blood test results.
3. wait on somebody hand and foot to do everything for someone while they do nothing – used to show disapproval:
His wife waits on him hand and foot.
wait something ↔ out phrasal verb
if you wait out an event, period, or time, especially an unpleasant one, you wait for it to finish:
Let’s find a place where we can wait out the storm.
wait up phrasal verb
1. to wait for someone to return before you go to bed
wait up for
Don’t wait up for me; I may be late.
2. Wait up! American English used to tell someone to stop, so that you can talk to them or go with them:
‘Wait up!’ he called.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

wait

 

 

wait [wait waits waited waiting] verb, noun   [weɪt]    [weɪt] 

 

verb
1. intransitive, transitive to stay where you are or delay doing sth until sb/sth comes or sth happens
She rang the bell and waited.
The President agreed to speak to the waiting journalists.
+ adv./prep. Have you been waiting long?
I've been waiting (for) twenty minutes.
I'll wait outside until the meeting's over.
~ for sb/sth Wait for me!
~ for sb/sth to do sth We're waiting for the rain to stop before we go out.
~ to do sth Hurry up! We're waiting to go.

~ your turn You'll just have to wait your turn (= wait until your turn comes).

2. intransitive, transitive to hope or watch for sth to happen, especially for a long time
~ (for sth) Leeds United had waited for success for eighteen years.
This is just the opportunity I've been waiting for.
~ for sb/sth to do sth He's waiting for me to make a mistake.

~ your chance I waited my chance and slipped out when no one was looking.

3. be waiting intransitive (of things) to be ready for sb to have or use
~ (for sb) There's a letter waiting for you at home.

~ to do sth The hotel had a taxi waiting to collect us.

4. intransitive to be left to be dealt with at a later time because it is not urgent
I've got some calls to make but they can wait until tomorrow.
I'm afraid this can't wait. It's very important.
more at wait for the dust to settle at  dust  n., (waiting) in the wings at  wing  n.
Verb forms:

 
Word Origin:
Middle English: from Old Northern French waitier, of Germanic origin; related to the verb wake. Early senses included ‘lie in wait (for)’, ‘observe carefully’, and ‘be watchful’.  
Example Bank:
He waited patiently while she got ready.
Hey! Wait a minute! I'll come with you!
I can hardly wait for my holiday!
I can't wait to see their new baby.
I could hardly wait for the weekend.
I had to wait in line at the bank.
I waited with bated breath for what would happen next.
I'm waiting for a bus.
She had to wait a long time for the right man to come along.
Their parents waited anxiously for news.
They waited in vain for a response.
We can't wait forever.
We simply cannot afford to wait any longer.
We'll have to wait until it stops raining.
We'll wait and see what the weather's like before we make a decision.
You might have to wait a while before you get an answer.
You'll have to wait until you're older.
You'll have to wait your turn. These people all come before you.
You'll just have to wait and see what you present is.
He's waiting for me to make a mistake.
Hurry up! We're waiting to go.
I'll wait outside until the meeting's over.
I'm afraid this can't wait. It's very important.
I've been waiting (for) twenty minutes.
I've got some calls to make but they can wait until tomorrow.
The team had waited for success for eighteen years.
This is just the opportunity I've been waiting for.
We're waiting for the rain to stop before we go out.
You'll just have to wait your turn.
Idioms: I/they can't wait hardly wait  a disaster waiting to happen  keep somebody waiting  wait a minute  wait and see  wait at table  wait for it  wait on somebody hand and foot  wait tables  wait till  what are we waiting for?  what are you waiting for?  you wait

Derived: wait about  wait behind  wait in  wait on somebody  wait something out  wait up 

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

wait / weɪt / verb [ I ]

A1 to allow time to go by, especially while staying in one place without doing very much, until someone comes, until something that you are expecting happens or until you can do something:

I waited for her in the corridor, while she went in to see the doctor.

The dentist kept me waiting for ages.

[ + to infinitive ] There were a lot of people waiting to use the phone.

to be done or to happen at a later time:

The meeting will have to wait until tomorrow, because I'm too busy now.

The paperwork can't wait until tomorrow (= is urgent and must be done now) .

no waiting UK ( US no standing ) used on signs to mean vehicles are not allowed to park, even for short periods of time:

The sign by the side of the road said 'no waiting'.

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

wait

[we͟ɪt]
 
 waits, waiting, waited

 1) VERB: no passive When you wait for something or someone, you spend some time doing very little, because you cannot act until that thing happens or that person arrives.
  [V for n] I walk to a street corner and wait for the school bus...
  [V for n to-inf] Stop waiting for things to happen. Make them happen...
  [V to-inf] I waited to see how she responded...
  Angus got out of the car to wait...
  [V n] We will have to wait a week or so before we know whether the operation is a success...
  [V-ing] He told waiting journalists that he did not expect a referendum to be held for several months. [Also V n for n]
  Derived words:
  waiting N-UNCOUNT The waiting became almost unbearable.
 2) N-COUNT: usu sing A wait is a period of time in which you do very little, before something happens or before you can do something.
  ...the four-hour wait for the organizers to declare the result.
 3) VERB: usu cont If something is waiting for you, it is ready for you to use, have, or do.
  [V for n] There'll be a car waiting for you...
  [have n V-ing for n] When we came home we had a meal waiting for us...
  [V to-inf] Ships with unfurled sails wait to take them aboard...
  [V to-inf] Three-hundred railway wagons were waiting to be unloaded...
  [have n V-ing to-inf] He had a taxi waiting to take him to the train...
  [have n V-ing] The President had his plane waiting, 20 minutes' drive away. [Also V]
 4) VERB: no cont If you say that something can wait, you mean that it is not important or urgent and so you will deal with it or do it later.
  I want to talk to you, but it can wait...
  Any changes will have to wait until sponsors can be found.
 5) VERB: only imper You can use wait when you are trying to make someone feel excited, or to encourage or threaten them.
  [V until cl/n] If you think this all sounds very exciting, just wait until you read the book...
  As soon as you get some food inside you, you'll feel more cheerful. Just you wait.
 6) VERB: only imper Wait is used in expressions such as wait a minute, wait a second, and wait a moment to interrupt someone when they are speaking, for example because you object to what they are saying or because you want them to repeat something. [SPOKEN]
  [V n] `Wait a minute!' he broke in. `This is not giving her a fair hearing!'
  Syn:
  hold on, hang on
 7) VERB If an employee waits on you, for example in a restaurant or hotel, they take orders from you and bring you what you want.
  [V on n] There were plenty of servants to wait on her...
  [V at n] Each student is expected to wait at table for one week each semester.
 8) PHRASE: oft PHR to-inf (emphasis) If you say that you can't wait to do something or can hardly wait to do it, you are emphasizing that you are very excited about it and eager to do it. [SPOKEN]
  We can't wait to get started...
  It's gonna be great. I can hardly wait...
  I could hardly wait to get out of there.
 9) CONVENTION You say `wait for it' to stop someone from doing something too soon because you have not yet given them the command to do it. [BRIT]
  Arms bend. Arms upward. Wait for it. Stretch.
 10) PHRASE: PHR with group You can use `wait for it' to indicate that you are about to say something that is amusing or surprising. [BRIT, INFORMAL]
  A cool $500,000 is to be spent on obtaining genuine 17th-century air from the inside of, wait for it, an occupied lead coffin.
 11) PHRASE: oft PHR n, PHR wh If you tell someone to wait and see, you tell them that they must be patient or that they must not worry about what is going to happen in the future because they have no control over it.
  We'll have to wait and see what happens.
  ...a wait-and-see attitude.
 12) PHRASE If you say to someone `What are you waiting for?' you are telling them to hurry up and do something. [SPOKEN]
  Well, what are you waiting for? Do I have to ask you for a kiss?
 13) an accident waiting to happensee accident
 ready and waitingsee ready
  Phrasal Verbs:
  - wait around
  - wait in
  - wait on
  - wait up

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

1wait /ˈweɪt/ verb waits; wait·ed; wait·ing
1 [no obj] : to stay in a place until an expected event happens, until someone arrives, until it is your turn to do something, etc.
• I hate waiting in long lines.
• They waited at the train station together.
• You should have waited a little longer. He showed up right after you left.
• I don't have time to wait around. If he's not here in five minutes, I'm leaving.
• She waited behind after class to talk to the professor.
• I'm sorry to have kept you waiting. How may I help you?
• I waited and waited but he never showed up.
- often followed by to + verb
• I'm waiting to use the bathroom.
• The taxi is waiting to bring us to the airport.
• Doctors are ready and waiting to give aid.
- often + for
• She read the newspaper while waiting for the bus.
Wait for me! I'll go with you.
• Take a seat and wait for your name to be called.
• It can take over an hour to be served at the restaurant, but the food is worth waiting for.
2 : to not do something until something else happens

[no obj]

Wait! Don't start the engine yet.
• We waited for the sun to set before starting the fire.
- often + until
• We'll wait until you come back to start the movie. [=we will not start the movie until you come back]

[+ obj]

• You will have to wait your turn. [=you cannot do something until it is your turn]
3 [no obj]
a : to remain in a state in which you expect or hope that something will happen soon
• I know she was happy when I lost my job. She was waiting to see me fail.
• I have waited for this opportunity for a long time.
b : to remain in a state in which you expect to learn or find out something soon
• You will have to wait two weeks for the test results.
• She waited for his answer.
• We are waiting to hear back from the doctor.
• He'll be a star some day—just (you) wait. [=I feel sure that he will be a star some day]
• I have to wait and see whether or not I got the job.
• “What are you making?” “Wait and see.”
4 [no obj] : to be done or dealt with at a later time
• The other issues will just have to wait until our next meeting.
• “Can this wait until tomorrow?” “No, it can't wait.”
5 [no obj] : to be in a place ready to be dealt with, taken, etc. - always used as (be) waiting
• It's time to come inside. Dinner is waiting.
- often + for
• There is a package waiting for you at home.
• She had several messages waiting for her at the office.
accident waiting to happen
- see accident
can't wait or can hardly wait
✦If you can't wait or can hardly wait, you are very excited about doing something or eager for something to happen or begin.
• The concert is tomorrow, and we can hardly wait!
• The children can hardly wait for summer.
• I can't wait to try your apple pie.
hurry up and wait
- see 1hurry
wait a minute/moment/second
1
- used to tell someone to stop and wait briefly
Wait a minute. I need to tie my shoe.
• Please wait one moment while I take this call.
• If you would just wait a second, I could explain what happened.
2
- used to interrupt someone or something because you have noticed, thought of, or remembered something
Wait a second—that's not what she said.
Wait a minute. I just remembered where I put the keys.
wait at table Brit formal : to serve food or drinks as a waiter or waitress
• He waited at table for two years.
wait for it chiefly Brit informal
- used to emphasize that the following statement is foolish, surprising, funny, etc.
• He says he was fired because—wait for it—he refused to compromise his principles.
wait in [phrasal verb] Brit : to stay at home and wait for someone or something to arrive
• I can't go out. I've got to wait in for a delivery.
wait on also wait upon [phrasal verb]
1 wait on/upon (someone)
a : to serve food or drinks as a waiter or waitress to (someone)
• The hostess waits on tables/people when the restaurant is crowded.
b : to provide service to (a customer) : to help (a customer) make purchases
• He is busy waiting on customers at the moment.
c : to act as a servant to (someone)
• He seems to expect his wife to wait on him.
• She waited on her children hand and foot. [=she acted like a servant to her children; she provided her children with everything they needed or wanted]
2 wait on/upon (someone or something) chiefly US : to wait for (someone or something) to arrive or happen
• We waited on him, but he never came.
• The government's decision must wait on the committee's report. [=the government's decision will not be made until the committee has issued its report]
wait out [phrasal verb] wait (something) out or wait out (something) : to stay in one place until the end of (something)
• We waited out the storm in our hotel room.
wait tables US : to serve food or drinks as a waiter or waitress
• She has a job waiting tables.
wait until/till
- used to emphasize that a future event is going to be very surprising, important, etc.
Wait till you see their new house. It's just beautiful!
• You think you're in trouble now? Just wait until your father finds out what you did, young lady! [=your father will be very angry and will punish you when he finds out what you did]
wait up [phrasal verb]
1 : to delay going to bed while you wait for someone to arrive
• I'll be late; don't wait up (for me).
2 chiefly US informal : to stop moving forward so that someone who is behind you can join you
• Hey, wait up (for me)! I'm going with you.
what are you waiting for?
- used to say that someone should do something immediately
What are we waiting for? Let's go inside and get something to eat.
• If you have so much work to do, then what are you waiting for?

Time

  1. Do you have enough time to do what you like? What would you do if you had more free time?
  2. Do you usually waste a lot of time? How?
  3. Is watching junk TV a waste of time?
  4. Are you a punctual person? What does it tell about you?
  5. What's your favorite time of the day/week/year? Why? What do you do at those times?
  6. Have you ever forgotten an important appointment? What happened?
  7. Do you usually show up early or late at parties?
  8. How do you feel when you are late for a class/appointment/date?
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