worry

English translation unavailable for .

worry

US /ˈwɝː.i/ 
UK /ˈwʌr.i/ 

to be anxious or unhappy about someone or something, so that you think about them a lot

Persian equivalent: 

دلواپس‌ كردن‌ يا شدن‌، نگران‌ كردن‌ يا شدن‌

Example: 

He began to worry about the future.

دلهره‌ى او درباره‌ى آينده‌ آغاز شد.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

worry

I.   verb

I. worry1 S1 W2 /ˈwʌri $ ˈwɜːri/ verb (past tense and past participle worried, present participle worrying, third person singular worries)
  [Word Family: adjective: worried ≠ UNWORRIED, worrying, worrisome; noun: worry, worrier; adverb: worryingly, worriedly; verb: worry]
 [Language: Old English; Origin: wyrgan 'to strangle']
 1. BE ANXIOUS  [intransitive] to be anxious or unhappy about someone or something, so that you think about them a lot
  worry about
   • I worry about my daughter.
   • You’ve really got no need to worry about your weight.
  worry (that)
   • She worried that she wasn’t doing enough to help.
  worry over
   • Dad worries over the slightest thing.
   • Don’t tell Mum about this – she’s got enough to worry about (=she already has a lot of problems or is very busy).
 2. don’t worry spoken
   a) used when you are trying to make someone feel less anxious:
   • Don’t worry, darling, Daddy’s here.
  don’t worry if
   • Don’t worry if you can’t finish all the questions.
   b) used to tell someone that they do not need to do something
  don’t worry about
   • Don’t worry about sorting them out – I’ll do it later.
   c) used to tell someone that you will definitely do something:
   • Don’t you worry, I’ll make sure he does his fair share.
 3. MAKE SOMEBODY ANXIOUS  [transitive] to make someone feel anxious about something:
   • The recent changes in the Earth’s climate are beginning to worry scientists.
   • I didn’t tell Mum and Dad – I didn’t want to worry them.
  what worries me is .../the (only) thing that worries me is ...
   • The only thing that worries me is the food. I don’t want to get food poisoning.
   • Doesn’t it worry you that Sarah spends so much time away from home?
  worry yourself (=feel anxious, especially when there is no need to)
   • You’re worrying yourself unnecessarily.
 4. not to worry British English spoken used to say that something is not important:
   • Not to worry, we can always go another time.
 5. nothing to worry about spoken used to tell someone that something is not as serious or difficult as they think:
   • It’s just a check-up – nothing to worry about.
 6. ANNOY  [transitive] to annoy someone SYN bother:
   • The heat didn’t seem to worry him.
 7. ANIMAL  [transitive] if a dog worries sheep, it tries to bite or kill them
 worry at something phrasal verb
  1. if an animal worries at a bone or piece of meat, it bites and shakes it
  2. if you worry at a problem, you think about it a lot in order to find a solution

II.   noun

II. worry2 S2 noun (plural worries)
  [Word Family: adjective: worried ≠ UNWORRIED, worrying, worrisome; noun: worry, worrier; adverb: worryingly, worriedly; verb: worry]
 1. [countable] a problem that you are anxious about or are not sure how to deal with
  sb’s main/biggest/real etc worry
   • My main worry is finding somewhere to live.
   • I had a lot of financial worries.
  be a worry to/for somebody
   • Money was always a big worry for us.
  REGISTER
   In written English, people often prefer to use concern rather than worry, because it sounds more formal:
   ▪ • One of voters’ key concerns is crime.
 2. [uncountable and countable] the feeling of being anxious about something
  be frantic/sick/desperate etc with worry (=feel extremely anxious)
   • His mother was desperate with worry.
   • He’s been a constant source of worry.
  worry about
   • We had no worries about safety.
 3. no worries British English spoken used to agree to what someone wants and to say that it will be no problem:
   • ‘Can you deliver on Thursday?’ ‘Yeah, no worries, mate.’
 

COLLOCATIONS■ adjectives

   ▪ sb’s main/biggest worryMy biggest worry is that I might make a fool of myself.
   ▪ a major/big/great worryTraffic congestion is not yet a major worry in the area.
   ▪ a real worryIt's a real worry that he is so far away.
   ▪ somebody's only worryMy only worry was that she wouldn't like it.
   ▪ a constant worryFor shopkeepers here, break-ins are a constant worry.
   ▪ a nagging worry (=one that you keep worrying about)She had a little nagging worry in the back of her mind about how Mickey would react.
   ▪ financial/money worriesBach’s last years were clouded by financial worries.
   ▪ a worry is unfounded (=there is no reason to worry)Fortunately their worries were unfounded and the astronauts returned safely to Earth.

■ phrases

   ▪ a source/cause of worryHer children were a constant source of worry.
   ▪ be sick/frantic with worryThe girl's mother was sick with worry over her missing daughter.
     • • •

THESAURUS■ something that makes you worried

   ▪ worry a problem that you are anxious about or are not sure how to deal with: • You should discuss your worries with your parents. | • Worries about the company’s performance sent its share prices falling.
   ▪ concern a situation that makes you feel worried, especially a problem that affects a lot of people, but that may not affect you personally: • One concern is the effects of these chemicals on the environment. | • Our main concern is that the boys are well looked after while their parents are away.
   ▪ troubles problems in your life that you are worried about: • I don't want to bore you with my troubles. | • She has enough troubles of her own at the moment. | • I hope all our troubles will be over soon.
   ▪ cares written problems or responsibilities in your life that make you worry: • She was not ready for the cares and responsibilities of running a family. | • A holiday would give them chance to forget about all their cares.
   ▪ hang-up informal a feeling of worry or embarrassment about something personal, such as your appearance or relationships with other people: • She has a hang-up about her nose. | • We all have our hang-ups.

■ the feeling of being worried

   ▪ worry the feeling of not being happy or relaxed and thinking a lot about a problem or something that is wrong: • She was sick with worry over her daughter. | • the look of worry on his face
   ▪ anxiety the feeling of being worried because you think that something bad has happened or will happen, and you feel that you have no control over the situation: • The thought of having to give a speech filled me with anxiety. | • The increase in heating costs is causing a lot of anxiety among elderly people.
   ▪ concern a worried feeling – use this especially when many people are worried about a problem that affects everyone: • The shortage of water is beginning to cause widespread concern.
   ▪ stress the feeling of being worried all the time, for example about work or personal problems, which can make you ill or very tired: • Her financial problems were causing her a lot of stress.
   ▪ anguish a feeling of extreme mental suffering caused by worry: • How could her parents survive the anguish of not knowing what had happened to her? | • When she spoke, her voice was full of anguish.
   ▪ angst a strong feeling of worry and anxiety because you are worried about your life, your future, or what you should do in a particular situation: • The letter was full of teenage angst - would she ever be able to find another boyfriend? | • There was much angst about the decision.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

worry

 

worry [worry worries worried worrying] verb, noun   [ˈwʌri]    [ˈwɜːri]

 

verb (wor·ries, worry·ing, wor·ried, wor·ried)

 

1. intransitive to keep thinking about unpleasant things that might happen or about problems that you have

Don't worry. We have plenty of time.

~ about sb/sth Don't worry about me. I'll be all right.

• He's always worrying about his weight.

~ over sb/sth There's no point in worrying over things you can't change.

~ (that)… I worry that I won't get into college.

2. transitive to make sb/yourself anxious about sb/sth

~ sb/yourself (about sb/sth) What worries me is how I am going to get another job.

~ sb/yourself + adj. (about sb/sth) He's worried himself sick (= become extremely anxious) about his daughter.

it worries sb that… It worries me that he hasn't come home yet.

it worries sb to do sth It worried me to think what might happen.

3. transitive to annoy or disturb sb

~ sb The noise never seems to worry her.

~ sb with sth Don't keep worrying him with a lot of silly questions.

4. transitive ~ sth (of a dog) to attack animals, especially sheep, by chasing and/or biting them

 

Word Origin:

Old English wyrgan ‘strangle’, of West Germanic origin. In Middle English the original sense of the verb gave rise to the meaning ‘seize by the throat and tear’, later figuratively ‘harass’, which led to the sense ‘cause anxiety to’ (early 19th century, the date also of the noun).

 

Example Bank:

• Don't bother Harry— he has enough to worry about as it is.

• Don't let it worry you unduly.

• Don't worry about me, I'll be fine.

• Don't worry the driver with unnecessary requests.

• Don't worry too much about it.

• I can't help worrying about the future.

• She worries a lot about crime.

• Stop worrying, Dad, we'll be fine.

• We can't help worrying for your safety.

• What really worries me is what we do if there's nobody there.

• You do worry unnecessarily, you know.

• He's worried himself sick about his daughter.

• I worry that I won't get into college.

• What worries me is how I'm going to get another job.

• You worry too much.

Idioms: no worries!  not to worry

Derived: worry at something 

 

noun (pl. worries)

 

1. uncountable the state of worrying about sth

Syn:  anxiety

• The threat of losing their jobs is a constant source of worry to them.

• A heart attack can be brought on by stress and worry.

• to be frantic with worry

2. countable something that worries you

• family/financial worries

~ (about/over sth) worries about the future

~ (for/to sb) Mugging is a real worry for many old people.

• My only worry is that…

• The news of his release from prison added further to her worries.

• Students should discuss any problems or worries they have with their course tutors.

 

Word Origin:

Old English wyrgan ‘strangle’, of West Germanic origin. In Middle English the original sense of the verb gave rise to the meaning ‘seize by the throat and tear’, later figuratively ‘harass’, which led to the sense ‘cause anxiety to’ (early 19th century, the date also of the noun).

 

Example Bank:

• For years, the government has dismissed our worries as unfounded.

• He was sick with worry about everything.

• Her mother's poor health caused her considerable worry.

• His mother's health is an enormous worry to him.

• I didn't know where he was and I was frantic with worry.

• I had a nagging worry that we weren't going to get there.

• It was a relief to share my secret worries with him.

• Money is a constant source of worry.

• Most of Nigel's worries proved groundless.

• My greatest worry is that he'll do something stupid.

• My immediate worry is money.

• No worries— there's plenty of time.

• Paying the mortgage is a big worry for many people.

• She gave her parents unnecessary worry when she forgot to call them.

• She wanted to enjoy her retirement without being beset by financial worries.

• Take the worry out of flying with our travel insurance offer.

• That year he had major health worries.

• The dollar has fallen to a new low amid worries that the American economy is heading for trouble.

• The earth tremors prompted worries of a second major earthquake.

• The fact that she heard nothing from him only increased her worry.

• The money side of things has been a constant worry.

• The staff all work very hard— we've got no worries on that account.

• There is no immediate cause for worry.

• These worries plagued him constantly.

• They will not have worries over money.

• Try and forget your worries for a little while.

• When he lost his job, the size of his flat was the least of his worries.

• He claims the illness was caused by stress and worry.

• financial/family worries

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

worry

worry (ANIMAL) /ˈwʌr.i/ US /ˈwɝː-/
verb [T]
If a dog worries another animal, it chases and frightens it and might also bite it:
Any dog caught worrying sheep in these fields will be shot.

 

x

worry (PROBLEM) /ˈwʌr.i/ US /ˈwɝː-/
verb
1 [I] to think about problems or unpleasant things that might happen in a way that makes you feel anxious:
Try not to worry - there's nothing you can do to change the situation.
Don't worry, she'll be all right.
It's silly worrying about things which are outside your control.
[+ (that)] She's worried (that) she might not be able to find another job.

2 [T] to make someone feel anxious because of problems or unpleasant things that might happen:
You worried your mother by not writing.
[+ that] It worries me that he hasn't phoned yet.
The continued lack of rain is starting to worry people.

worry /ˈwʌr.i/ US /ˈwɝː-/
noun
1 [C] a problem that makes you feel anxious:
health/financial worries
Keeping warm in the winter is a major worry for many old people.

2 [C or U] when you feel anxious about something:
Unemployment, bad health - all sorts of things can be a cause of worry.
It was clear that Anna had no worries about her husband's attempts to flirt.

worried /ˈwʌr.id/ US /ˈwɝː-/
adjective
She was sitting behind her desk with a worried expression/look on her face.
They don't seem particularly worried about the situation.
You had me worried (= You made me feel anxious) for a moment back there - I thought you wouldn't be able to stop in time.
He was worried sick (= extremely worried) when he heard that there had been an accident.

worriedly /ˈwʌr.id.li/ US /ˈwɝː-/
adverb
He looked back worriedly over his shoulder.

worrier /ˈwʌr.i.əʳ/ US /ˈwɝː.i.ɚ/
noun [C]
someone who worries a lot:
I can't help being a worrier - some people are just born that way.

worrying /ˈwʌr.i.ɪŋ/ US /ˈwɝː-/
adjective
making you feel anxious:
It's a very worrying situation.

worryingly /ˈw
adverb
Worryingly, the gun was never found.

worrisome
adjective US FORMAL OR OLD-FASHIONED
worrying:
Alcohol and tobacco consumption by young people is especially worrisome because habits formed early are likely to persist.

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

worry

[wʌ̱ri, AM wɜ͟ːri]

 worries, worrying, worried
 1) VERB If you worry, you keep thinking about problems that you have or about unpleasant things that might happen.
  Don't worry, your luggage will come on afterwards by taxi...
  [V about n/-ing] I worry about her constantly...
  [V about n/-ing] I work in a school so I don't have to worry about finding someone to look after my little boy...
  [V that] They worry that extremists might gain control.
 2) VERB If someone or something worries you, they make you anxious because you keep thinking about problems or unpleasant things that might be connected with them.
  [V n] I'm still in the early days of my recovery and that worries me...
  [V n] `Why didn't you tell us?' - `I didn't want to worry you.'...
  [V-ed] The English, worried by the growing power of Prince Henry, sent a raiding party to Scotland to kill him...
  [it V n that/to-inf] Does it worry you that the Americans are discussing this?
 3) VERB: oft with neg If someone or something does not worry you, you do not dislike them or you are not annoyed by them. [SPOKEN]
  [V n] The cold doesn't worry me...
  [it V n if] It wouldn't worry me if he came to my house, but I don't know if I would go out of my way to ask him.
  Syn:
  bother
 4) N-UNCOUNT Worry is the state or feeling of anxiety and unhappiness caused by the problems that you have or by thinking about unpleasant things that might happen.
  The admission shows the depth of worry among the Tories over the state of the economy...
  His last years were overshadowed by financial worry.
 5) N-COUNT A worry is a problem that you keep thinking about and that makes you unhappy.
  My main worry was that Madeleine Johnson would still be there...
  The worry is that the use of force could make life impossible for the UN peacekeepers...
  His wife Cheryl said she had no worries about his health.
 6) CONVENTION You say not to worry to someone to indicate that you are not upset or angry when something has gone wrong. [INFORMAL]
  `Not to worry, Baby,' he said, and kissed her tenderly.

Health

  1. Are you in good health?
  2. What do you do to keep healthy?
  3. How often do you visit a doctor?
  4. Do you usually worry about your health? How about the health of those who are around you?
  5. What are some common health problems in your country? What's the root of these problems (genetic, climate,…)?
  6. How often do you go to gym?
  7. How many times a week do you eat fresh fruit and vegetables?
  8. Do you read any magazines/books about health? Do you recommend them to your friends?
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