single

English translation unavailable for .

single

US /ˈsɪŋ.ɡəl/ 
UK /ˈsɪŋ.ɡəl/ 

not married, or not involved in a romantic relationship with anyone

Persian equivalent: 

مجرد

Example: 

Are you married or single?

Zari decided to stay single for the rest of her life

 

زری تصمیم گرفت تا اخر عمر مجرد بماند

Oxford Essential Dictionary

single

 noun

1 a ticket for a journey to a place, but not back again:
A single to Brighton, please.
Look at return.

2 a CD, tape, etc. that has only one song on each side; the main song on this CD or tape:
Have you heard Joss Stone's new single?
Look at album.

 

 adjective

1 only one:
He gave her a single red rose.

2 a word that makes 'every' stronger:
You answered every single question correctly.

3 not married:
Are you married or single?

4 for one person:
I would like to book a single room, please.
a single bed
Look at double.

5 (British) for a journey to a place, but not back again:
How much is a single ticket to London, please?
Look at return.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

single

I. single1 S1 W1 /ˈsɪŋɡəl/ BrE AmE adjective
[Word Family: noun: single, singles, singleness, the singular, singularity; adverb: singly, singularly; adjective: single, singular]
[Date: 1200-1300; Language: Old French; Origin: Latin singulus]
1. ONE [only before noun] only one:
A single tree gave shade from the sun.
They won the game by a single point.
the highest price ever paid for a single work of art
a single-sex school (=one for only boys or girls)
2. every single used to emphasize that you are talking about every person or thing:
Don’t write down every single word I say.
He works every single day.
3. not a single no people or things at all:
The plane was brought down safely and not a single passenger was killed.
We didn’t get a single reply to the advertisement.
4. the single biggest/greatest etc used to emphasize that you are talking about the one thing that is the biggest, greatest etc:
Cigarette smoking is the single most important cause of lung cancer.
Tourism is the country’s single biggest earner.
5. NOT MARRIED not married, or not involved in a romantic relationship with anyone:
The changes in tax rates will benefit single people the most.
Is he single?
6. single bed/room etc a bed, room etc that is meant to be used by one person only:
You have to pay extra for a single room. ⇨ double1(4)
7. TICKET British English a single ticket etc is for a trip from one place to another but not back again SYN one-wayreturn, round-trip
• • •
THESAURUS
married having a husband or wife: How long have you been married? | a married couple
single not married: Chris is 45 and still single. | single mothers
engaged having formally agreed to marry someone in the future: Jane and Pete have just got engaged. | engaged couples
live together to share a home and have a sexual relationship, but not be married: More and more couples are choosing to live together rather than get married.
separated no longer living with your husband or wife because of problems in your marriage: I think Joan and Brian are separated now.
divorced no longer married because you have legally ended your marriage: My parents got divorced when I was 10. | divorced men
widowed no longer married because your husband or wife has died: He’s a widowed father of two.
II. single2 BrE AmE noun [countable]
[Word Family: noun: single, singles, singleness, the singular, singularity; adverb: singly, singularly; adjective: single, singular]
1. MUSIC a CD that has only one song on it, not a number of songs, or a song which is sold in this way ⇨ album:
Have you heard their latest single?
2. SPORT
a) one ↑run2 in a game of ↑cricket
b) a hit that allows the person who is hitting the ball to reach first ↑base in a game of baseball
3. TENNIS singles [uncountable] a game, especially in tennis, in which one person plays on their own against another person:
I prefer playing singles.
Who won the women’s singles? ⇨ doubles at ↑double2(3)
4. NOT MARRIED singles [plural] people who are not married and are not involved in a romantic relationship with anyone:
The show is especially popular among young singles.
a singles night at the club
5. TICKET British English a ticket for a trip from one place to another but not back again SYN one-way ticket American Englishreturn:
A single to Oxford, please.
6. MONEY American English a piece of paper money worth one dollar:
Anybody have five singles?
7. ROOM a room in a hotel for just one person ⇨ double:
I’m afraid we haven’t got any singles available.
III. single3 BrE AmE verb
single somebody/something ↔ out phrasal verb
to choose one person or thing from among a group because they are better, worse, more important etc than the others
single somebody/something ↔ out for
I don’t see why he should be singled out for special treatment.
single somebody/something ↔ out as
One programme was singled out as being particularly good.
 

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

single

 

sin·gle [single singles singled singling] adjective, noun, verb   [ˈsɪŋɡl]    [ˈsɪŋɡl] 

 

adjective

 

ONE
1. only before noun only one
• He sent her a single red rose.
• a single-sex school (= for boys only or for girls only)
• All these jobs can now be done by one single machine.
• I couldn't understand a single word she said!
• the European single currency, the euro

• (BrE) a single honours degree (= for which you study only one subject)  

 

FOR EMPHASIS

2. only before noun used to emphasize that you are referring to one particular person or thing on its own
• Unemployment is the single most important factor in the growing crime rates.

• We eat rice every single day.  

 

NOT MARRIED

3. (of a person) not married or having a romantic relationship with sb
• The apartments are ideal for single people living alone.
• Are you still single?

see also  single parent  

 

FOR ONE PERSON

4. only before noun intended to be used by only one person
• a single bed/room
• a single sheet (= large enough for a single bed)

compare  double  adj. (3) 

 

TICKET

5. only before noun (BrE) (also one-way NAmE, BrE) a single ticket, etc. can be used for travelling to a place but not back again
• a single ticket
• How much is the single fare to Glasgow?
compare  return  n. (7)
see (in) Indian/single file at  file  n., at a (single) glance at  glance  n.  
Word Origin:
Middle English: via Old French from Latin singulus, related to simplus ‘simple’.  
Thesaurus:
single adj.
1. only before noun
• What is the single most important factor here?
individual • • particular • • specific • • separate • • distinct
a/an single/individual/particular/specific/separate/distinct category/region
a single/particular/specific/separate event/incident/occasion
a single/particular/specific/distinct objective/purpose
2.
• The apartments are ideal for single people living alone.
unmarried • • divorced • • widowed • • separated • |especially BrE, especially written lone
Opp: married
a single/unmarried/divorced/widowed/separated/lone man/woman/parent/mother/father  
Example Bank:
• Marriage breakdown is common and there are a large number of single-parent families.
• Unemployment is the single most important factor in the rising crime rates.
• We eat rice every single day.

Derived: single somebody out 

 

noun  

TICKET
1. countable (BrE) a ticket that allows you to travel to a place but not back again
• How much is a single to York?

compare  return  n. (7) 

 

MUSIC

2. countable a piece of recorded music, usually popular music, that consists of one song; a CD that a single is recorded on
• The band releases its new single next week.

compare  album  

 

ROOM

3. countable a room in a hotel, etc. for one person
• Singles are available from £50 per night.

compare  double  n. (5) 

 

MONEY

4. countable (NAmE) a bill/note that is worth one dollar

compare  double  n. (5) 

 

UNMARRIED PEOPLE

5. singles plural people who are not married and do not have a romantic relationship with sb else
• They organize parties for singles.

• a singles bar/club  

 

IN SPORT

6. singles uncountable + singular or plural verb (especially in tennis) a game when only one player plays against one other; a series of two or more of these games
• the women's singles champion
• the first round of the men's singles
• a singles match
• She's won three singles titles this year.

compare  doubles n. (6)

 

7. countable (in cricket) a hit from which a player scores one run (= point)

8. countable (in baseball) a hit that only allows the player to run to first base  
Word Origin:
Middle English: via Old French from Latin singulus, related to simplus ‘simple’.  
Example Bank:
• A single to Stratford, please.
• Following the success of their breakthrough single, a follow-up is planned.
• Her catchy first single was a hit.
• Her new album features her single ‘Georgia Rain’.
• I got a single to Birmingham.
• I prefer playing singles to doubles.
• It was voted the best single by a solo artist.
• She decided not to play in the singles.
• She was in her room playing her singles.
• She won the junior singles.
• The band has yet to record a hit single.
• The band later released this album track as a single.
• The radio stations play her new single several times a day.
• They put out a single in time for Christmas.
• number one in the singles chart
• the classic comeback single from Take That

• the new single from the band ‘Therapy?’

 

verb
Verb forms:

 
Word Origin:
Middle English: via Old French from Latin singulus, related to simplus ‘simple’.

 

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

single

single (NOT MARRIED) /ˈsɪŋ.gļ/
adjective
not married, or not having a romantic relationship with someone:
a single woman/man/person
He's been single for so long now, I don't think he'll ever marry.
The number of single-parent families dependent on the state has risen enormously in recent years.

singles /ˈsɪŋ.gļz/
plural noun
people who are not married and do not have a romantic relationship with someone

 

single (SEPARATE) /ˈsɪŋ.gļ/
adjective [before noun]
considered on its own; separate from other things:
Patience is the single most important quality needed for this job.
She lost every single thing when her house burned down.

 

single (ONE) /ˈsɪŋ.gļ/
adjective [before noun]
one only:
He knocked his opponent down with a single blow.
Not a single person offered to help her.
You haven't been listening to a single word I've been saying.
Compare double (TWICE).

single /ˈsɪŋ.gļ/
verb [I]
A baseball player singles by hitting a ball that allows him to reach first base.

single /ˈsɪŋ.gļ/
noun [C]
1 a record or CD which has only one main song on it:
Have you heard Michael Jackson's new single?

2 in cricket, one run

3 in baseball, a hit which allows the player to reach first base

4 UK single (ticket) a ticket for a journey to a place, but not for the return:
May I have a single to London, please.

5 a single room

singleness /ˈsɪŋ.gļ.nəs/
noun
singleness of mind/purpose attention to one thing:
He showed great singleness of mind in dealing with the problem.

singles /ˈsɪŋ.gļz/
noun [U]
a game, especially in tennis, played between one player on one side and one on the other
Compare doubles.

singly /ˈsɪŋ.gli/
adverb
one at a time:
Doctors usually see their patients singly.

 

single room

single room noun [C] (ALSO single)
a room in a hotel for one person:
I'd like a single room, please.

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

single

[sɪ̱ŋg(ə)l]
 
 singles, singling, singled

 1) ADJ: ADJ n (emphasis) You use single to emphasize that you are referring to one thing, and no more than one thing.
  A single shot rang out...
  Over six hundred people were wounded in a single day...
  She hadn't uttered a single word.
 2) ADJ: det ADJ (emphasis) You use single to indicate that you are considering something on its own and separately from other things like it.
  Every single house in town had been damaged...
  The Middle East is the world's single most important source of oil.
 3) ADJ Someone who is single is not married. You can also use single to describe someone who does not have a girlfriend or boyfriend.
  Is it difficult being a single mother?...
  I now have to face the rest of my life as a single person...
  Gay men are now eligible to become foster parents whether they are single or have partners.
 4) ADJ: usu ADJ n A single room is a room intended for one person to stay or live in.
  A single room at the Astir Hotel costs ₤56 a night.
 N-COUNT
 Single is also a noun. It's ₤65 for a single, ₤98 for a double and ₤120 for an entire suite.
 5) ADJ: ADJ n A single bed is wide enough for one person to sleep in.
 6) ADJ: usu ADJ n A single ticket is a ticket for a journey from one place to another but not back again. [BRIT]
  The price of a single ticket is thirty-nine pounds.
  Ant:
  return
 N-COUNT
 Single is also a noun. ...a Club Class single to Los Angeles. (in AM, use one-way)
 7) N-COUNT A single is a small record which has one short song on each side. You can also refer to the main song on a small record as a single.
  Kids today don't buy singles...
  The collection includes all the band's British and American hit singles.
 8) N-UNCOUNT Singles is a game of tennis or badminton in which one player plays another. The plural singles can be used to refer to one or more of these matches.
  Boris Becker of West Germany won the men's singles...
  She is equally at home on the singles or doubles court.
  Ant:
  doubles
 9) N-COUNT In cricket, a single is a hit from which one run is scored. In baseball, a single is a hit by which a batter reaches first base.
 10) → See also single-
 in single filesee file
  Phrasal Verbs:
  - single out

 

single-

[sɪ̱ŋg(ə)l-]
 COMB in ADJ
 single- is used to form words which describe something that has one part or feature, rather than having two or more of them.
  The single-engine plane landed in western Arizona.
  ...a single-track road.

Happiness

  1. What comes to your mind when you hear the word happiness? What is happiness for you?
  2. Are you a happy person?
  3. Do you think happiness comes from inside or it depends on other people and things?
  4. When did you last feel very happy? What happened?
  5. How do you show your happiness? Do you share it with others or keep it private?
  6. Who are happier, single people or married ones? Why?
  7. What makes you unhappy?
  8. Which country has the happiest people in the world? Which has the saddest? Why is it so?
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